Nominated!!!

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It is so lovely to be nominated for two categories in NepaliAustralian‘s awards

Best Personal Blog

Most Diverse Blog

for 2017
These blog awards are really is a great way to discover some new high quality blogs for those with interests in common.
You can vote for whomever you think worthy!!

Something to Ponder About
Click here to Vote

 

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Monday Mystery – Fredriksten Festning – Halden

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object. I encourage you to leave a comment if you think you might know where this week’s photograph, shown immediately below, is located. If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog when the answer will be revealed the following week. Guest submissions of MM photos are very welcome. Drop me an email if you would like to submit a photography to Monday Mystery Photo.

Last week we were in Fredriksten Festning, Norway, looking over the Swedish border! This fortress is situated high on the hill in Halden, and has an excellent vantage point for the Danish and Norwegian armies to warn of approaching invaders.

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Now I could say that Gerard, was correct, if I could call Norway and Sweden part of Northern Europe! But it was really Ted from Recipereminiscing, who recalled visiting the fortress at Halden, as a child, and it is he that guessed the correct answer. Excellent effort Ted! Perhaps Ted even climbed, (as my girl did), upon one of the relic cannons which still stands watch for the marauding Swedes!!

Here are some interesting historical facts:

Fredriksten dates from the 17th century and was named after King Frederik III of Denmark and Norway, (ruler at the time). It has seen many battles between the years of 1660 and 1814, mostly between the Norwegians and the Swedes, with the Norwegian Danish forces being triumphant. It seems Halden, must have been a thorn in the Swede’s side, as two of their King Charles’ have died there, the last shot in somewhat unusual circumstances. There was even a rumour it was a Swedish soldier that killed his commander, although this may have been by accident.

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Fredriksten Festning, Halden, Norway

Some interesting facts from http://www.spottinghistory.com:

Charles XII of Sweden attempted to take Frederiksten by storm on 4 July 1716. His troops took the town after fierce fighting, but the citizens set fire to their own houses, forcing Charles, unable to take the fortress, to retreat and await the arrival of heavy siege guns. Unfortunately for the invading army the entire Swedish transport fleet was captured or destroyed by the Norwegian naval hero Tordenskjold in Bohuslen. Running low on supplies, Charles retreated hastily across the Svinesund and burned the bridges behind him. In the Autumn of 1718 Charles once more attacked Norway, intending to first capture Halden to be able to sustain a siege of Akershus [Oslo]. The 1,400 strong garrison of Frederiksten fought ferociously to hold back the invasion…..the Swedish army intensified their efforts against the main fort. The Swedish trenches had almost reached the main fortification walls when on the evening of 11 December 1718, a bullet struck and killed [Swedish] Charles XII while he inspected the work. The death of the king effectively ended the attack on Fredriksten and the invasion was called off, leading to the conclusion of the war. A memorial is located in the park named in his memory where the Swedish king fell, just in front of the fortress.  The old fortress flag from 1814, taken by the Swedish troops and not returned to Norway until 1964, is preserved in the present day museum located inside the inner fortress.

Halden can be reached easily from Norway’s capital, Oslo by train and bus.

Thanks to all who commented on this and indeed for commenting on the Mmp’s, in 2017.

I hope I have given you something to ponder about!

MMP will be back in 2017.

Monday Mystery

 

 

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Proverbial Thursday – Global Words of Wisdom

proverbial-thursI find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

The greater love is a mother’s; then comes a dog’s; then a sweetheart’s –

Polish Proverb

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“I would rather be poor with lots of stories to tell, then rich with nothing to say “-

Kari Lundgren

 

The Lundgren quote reminds me that some one could be wealthy, and also feel quite lonely, yet a person might conversely remain financially poor, whilst living comfortably in an environment where there is lots of humour, company and animated conversation. Being rich is not only about money.

The Polish proverb speaks of our early experiences of love and the unique and very special love that a nurturing mother/carer can give a child. Pet Dogs, and other animals, can also be incredibly loyal to their owners, but their affection is quite different to a maternal love. But how?

This proverb reminds me that people and others may have expectations around the term Mother. We expect Mothers to be loyal, reliable and caring and others less so, perhaps because they have not got as much to lose? A mother’s/primary carer’s love might be less self-centred, and more altruistic than others, as there is a strong drive in Mothers/primary carers to assist their children to do better, succeed, go forward in life, than themselves.

What do you think? Would you agree?

How does maternal love differ from other sorts of affections?

 

Something to Ponder About this Thursday

 

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Monday Mystery Photo- Supplementary photo

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object. I encourage you to leave a comment if you think you might know where this week’s photograph, shown immediately below, is located. If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog when the answer will be revealed the following week. Guest submissions of MM photos are very welcome. Drop me an email if you would like to submit a photography to Monday Mystery Photo.

This week, I have posted a second photo of the mystery location posted last week. Where in the world might the following scene be located?

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I will hold comments until Friday or Saturday, of the week that they are published, to enable everyone to have a guess without answers being revealed in the comments.

More fun for everyone!

NB. This will be the last Monday mystery photo for 2016. However, it will return early in 2017, with more guest submissions! Thanks ever so much to all the wonderful blogger friends who contributed and commented. Collectively, you made it a lot of fun and helped give the blogging community Something to Ponder About.

My very best wishes to everyone for the festive season.

Monday Mystery

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Proverbial Thursday – Global Words to Live By

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

Many thanks to TidiousTed who has supplied us with an excellent proverb to mull over and discuss this week.

 “Everyone walks the furthest in their own company” – Icelandic proverb

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and from Mark Twain, a gem:

“Principles have no real force except when one is well-fed”

– Mark Twain

I invite you to leave a comment and tell me what you think of the Icelandic proverb and Mark Twain’s quote.

The journey always seems shorter when accompanied by a friend. Particularly so, if one was walking the long lonely roads through the Icelandic mountain passes. Would you agree?

Samuel Langhorne Clemens is better known by his pen name, Mark Twain and was born on November 30, 1835…  [More: here]   Mark Twain traveled many roads during his life and patented a variety of inventions. Despite experiencing poverty during his younger years he became a household name, received a honarary doctorate and advised politicians on copyright law. Perhaps this had a bearing on his quote, that I have selected to showcase, this week. What do you think?

Surely something to ponder about.

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Nominations open for NEPALIAUSTRALIAN’s Blog Award 2016

Blog Awards are a great idea for extending one’s blogging community and discovering new blogs.  I am a modest person, but perhaps my blog might be considered a diverse blog for 2016?

If you think it is, you can nominate over at nepaliaustralian.com

 

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Like very year, I am hosting Nepaliaustralian’s Blog Award. Nepaliaustralian’s Blog Awards celebrates the best in blogging with 8 winners being announced at Jan 2017.

nepaliaustralianblogaward2016Every year many blogs are created to express thoughts and emotions. Some are really interesting while others are funny. While some choose to share about their life or relationship others share their skills and passion like cooking, photography or fashion. No matter what field the blog belongs to, if it is good, it needs to be recognized and more and more people should be able to reach these blogs.

Please nominate your favorite blogs in following the categories.

  1. Best Blog 2016
  2. Best Photo Blog 2016
  3. Best Food Blog 2016
  4. Best Travel Blog 2016
  5. Best Fashion Blog 2016
  6. Best Personal Blog 2016
  7. Most Diverse Blog 2016
  8. Best New Blog 2016 (Blog must be started in 2016)

 The rules:

  • Any pages with dated entries that existed at some point during…

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Monday Mystery Photo – Last week Montreaux

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object. I encourage you to leave a comment if you think you might know where this week’s photograph, shown immediately below, is located. If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog when the answer will be revealed the following week. Guest submissions of MM photos are very welcome. Drop me an email if you would like to submit a photography to Monday Mystery Photo.

Where in the world might the following scene be located?

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Last week we were in the French part of Switzerland at Montreaux, at the Freddie Mercury statue in the city.  Mel & Suan, TidiousTed  and Drake got the guernsey this week for a correct guess!  Congratulations!

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Why was the statue here? According to MySwitzerland:

At the Montreux Jazz Festival in 1978, the singer recorded the album “Jazz” with Queen. He fell in love with Montreux and Lake Geneva and decided to settle here. He said, among other things, “If you want peace of soul, come to Montreux”.

To commemorate his time in Montreux, a bronze statue of Freddie Mercury was placed by the waterfront in 1996. And what of today? Well, his fans still come and place flowers by his monument every day.

NB.  I am going to hold the comments and approve them manually, releasing them on Friday/Saturday this week, so if your comment isn’t showing immediately, this is why. It will give everyone a chance to guess, without looking at the previously posted comments.  Good luck everyone!

Everyone then has a good deal to ponder about!

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Proverbial Thursday – Global Words of Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

 

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Never test a river’s depth with both feet – African proverb

Kindness is more important than wisdom, and the recognition of this is the beginning of wisdom 

Theodore Rubin

(American Psychiatrist and Author)

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Many thanks to Ted from Recipereminiscing for sharing his African proverb. What do you make of this foreboding proverb from Africa and additionally that of Theodore Rubin’s quote? Is being kind a more feasible objective in life? Or is gathering wisdom a naturally symbiotic process with kindness? Can someone be wise, but still unkind?

Something to Ponder About

Please share your thoughts in a comment.

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Monday Mystery Photo – Last week New Zealand

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object. I encourage you to leave a comment if you think you might know where this week’s photograph, shown immediately below, is located. If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog when the answer will be revealed the following week. Guest submissions of MM photos are very welcome. Drop me an email if you would like to submit a photography to Monday Mystery Photo.

Where in the world might this scene be located?

montreaux

NB. Again this week, I am going to hold the comments and approve them manually, releasing them on Friday/Saturday this week, so if your comment isn’t showing immediately, this is why. It will give everyone a chance to guess without looking at the previously posted comments. 

Everyone then has a good deal to ponder about!

Last week’s photo, kindly submitted by Blogger Leya. It took a bit of detective work to correctly determine it was in the southern hemisphere and not the north. The following people cleverly worked out that it was the hot springs near Rotorua, in the North Island, New Zealand.

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Pooja was the first to accurately determine the correct location closely followed by TidiousTed and Drake and newcomer, Mistermuse, who hedged his bets with a second guess!! Well done to you all.

Here you are some information from this site

http://media.newzealand.com/en/story-ideas/new-zealands-pink-and-white-terraces/

By the 1880s, the pink and white silica terraces cascading down a hillside in the thermal Rotorua region had become known as ‘the eighth wonder of the world’, and were New Zealand’s most famous tourist attraction.

From the nearest town of Rotorua – which was renowned for its thermal wonders and Maori culture – travellers had to ride by horse and cart across hills, then two hours by canoe and on foot to see the natural masterpiece.

In 1886, the Pink and White Terraces were destroyed when Mt Tarawera erupted, devastating most of the surrounding landscape, and killing more than 150 people.

Today you can visit naturally recreated terraces. The Wairakei Terraces, near Taupo, were initially helped by man, but nature is now fashioning the cascading silica steps in pinks, blues and whites.

Nature is a constantly evolving and dynamic force to ponder about.

 

 

 

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Sorbian Inspiration – Traditional Tuesday

In 1734, South-eastern Prussia a guild was founded for the blue and Schönfärber crafts, wherein linen, and in later years cotton fabrics, were printed using a particular indigo blue dye and a resist process.Kornaehren.jpg

History and Development

Although Blaudruck or Blueprint fabric design is highly parochial and a traditional folk art, rather than existing on a commercial level,  the ideas and inspiration for this form of textile design, had its roots in the wider art forms of the eighteenth century. Peasants from Cottbus and Lusatia were influenced by elaborate tapestries, expensive furnishings and blue and white porcelain styles  they saw in around them during the 18th century. Blueprint then developed into a cottage industry of hand-woven linen fabrics, made by the rural population, and then dyed predominantly in indigo blue but occasionally in red or yellow.

For many handcrafts, as well as Blaudruck, industrialization spelled the end of most blue printing workshops and only a handful remained to carry on this craft.

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The Process

The color is transferred directly to the fabric surface and appears first as brown. After drying, the material is placed in a developing bath, in which the brown ink changes to a bright blue by a chemical reaction. The fabric is finally boiled, pressed and then ready for use. Printing must be done very carefully, as errors can not be corrected. This craft process is a further development of the original reserve print and is used when a blue pattern is to be created on a white background.

It is a dyeing process, not a printing process as the color is transferred directly to the fabric surface and initially appears brown. After drying, the material is then placed on racks in a developing bath, and a chemical reaction turns the brown ink to a bright blue. Lastly, the fabric is  boiled and pressed before it is ready for use. The fabric is hung on an iron frame in layers and dipped into a deep ‘Färbebottich,’ or vat.

An alternative process can create a similar blue colored fabric using a form of etching using a corrosive substance (etching), which also leads to a white pattern on a blue background.

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Motifs

The ornamental motifs and patterns that are used, in Blueprint textiles, are some of the oldest known patterns used in textile design. Florals, perpetual borders and Christianity motifs were popular themes and clearly an integral part of folk’s lives.

“Blueprint” have been used to decorate such items as tablecloths, pillowcases, curtains, and wall hangings.Even in clothing fashion, it was used as as an element of  ethnic minority from the Lusatian region. Aprons, in particular are printed with different patterns on the front and back

Read more here.

Rosemaling traditional art

Something to Ponder About

Blueprint textile design is something I will be pondering more about.

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Proverbial Thursday – Global Words of Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

This week, I have a proverb from Bengal and two interesting quotes about the relative forces of nature: one from a science fiction program and the other from the world’s most acclaimed playwrights – William Shakespeare

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As the master is away, the workers take rest.

Bengali Proverb

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“The glory of creation is in its infinite diversity.”

“And the ways our differences combine to create meaning and beauty.”
— Miranda and Spock, “Is There In Truth No Beauty?” (Star Trek: The Original Series)

Sea lion kiss

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.

William Shakespeare

Who would have thought there was a common thread between these a Science fiction fantasy and the Bard’s acclaimed words. Do you see a connection? If so, what is the connection you see between the two quotes?

Something to Ponder About

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Monday Mystery Photo – Last week Spain

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object. I encourage you to leave a comment if you think you might know where this week’s photograph, shown immediately below, is located. If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog when the answer will be revealed the following week. Guest submissions of MM photos are very welcome. Drop me an email if you would like to submit a photography to Monday Mystery Photo.

Here is this week’s photo, kindly submitted for you by guest contributor, Blogger Leya. who has some fabulous photos on her blog, if you wish to visit. Just before I had an extended summer break this week, Anne-C sent me some of her wonderful photos, for Monday Mystery, including this one –

Where in the world could this be located?

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NB. Again this week, I am going to hold the comments and approve them manually, releasing them on Friday/Saturday this week, so if your comment isn’t showing immediately, this is why. It will give everyone a chance to guess without looking at the previously posted comments. 

Everyone then has a good deal to ponder about!

Cordoba Wheel

Cordoba Wheel

Last week (photo above), MMP was in Andalusia, in Spain, courtesy of  blogger, Millie Thom, who has kindly written the information below, about last week’s photo. Thanks so much Millie!

The following people guessed the location correctly:

Pooja from Stories from Europe,

Tidious Ted from Recipereminiscing

Drake from Le drake noir

The Albolafia Water Mill

The mill is situated in the city of Córdoba in Andalucía, Southern Spain. It sits on the northern bank of the River Guadalquivir, a little downriver of the famous Roman bridge. It was built during the rule of the emir, Abd al-Rahman II (731–788) to carry water up to the Alcazar (palace) by means of an aqueduct. This wheel (as well as another three on ‘islands’ across the river) was rotated by the current generated by man-made weirs or mill races.

The Albolafia wheel we see today has been restored, the original having been dismantled on the orders of Queen Isabella (of Ferdinand and Isabella fame, parents of Catherine of Aragon). It seems that Isabella – or Isabel La Católica, as she was known – disliked the loud squeaking of the chains and buckets as they transported water into the palace gardens for irrigation purposes.

Some very interesting historic facts to ponder about.

Monday Mystery

 

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Travel theme: Snowy

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A few days ago, I saw this meme referring to those who love snow. Yeh, that’s me, for sure! My hand’s up, waving frantically in enthusiasm for snow and the colder elements. People in the northern hemisphere must think I am stark raving mad, and I can see where they are coming from, when cold surrounds them for the majority of the year. However, not only do I love the snow and cold, I crave it! I am even married to a man whose nickname was Snowy!!! My holiday destinations usually encompass snow in some form as you will see here.

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There is plenty of Snowy scenes in Iceland in winter

A friend who knows me very well saw the meme and said, “This is SO you, Amanda!”

She knows! I thought.She knows me so well. She knows for instance that I have a preference for low light, that I hate the blazing sun and glare and suffer from the effects of it; and she knows that I feel energized when it is cold and finally she knows that being in a snowy place fills my heart with contentment!

Skellefteå

Skellefteå – Swedish Lapland

You think I am crazy too? Then I challenge you to find me a person that feels energized on a 37 degrees plus day (97 for Fahrenheit readers), and I will be genuinely surprised. Even the Spanish/Mexicans etc need a siesta at high noon!

28th April MM photo

Iceland

There are many that claim they crave warmth and heat. Chionophile deniers, I accuse them, under my breath! These are the people who can’t wait to travel to tropical island destinations for holidays or go out in the heat and glare of the midday sun, without hats and sun protection. And yet, it is these same self-confessed sun ‘worshipers,’ who are spotted at these tropical destinations – exactly WHERE, I ask?

Mostly you will find them languishing on a hammock/bar stool/ beach towel/ or a day bed dotted with cushions in trendy colours. Yes, languishing in the SHADE of course! Why? Because it is SO HOT, they state wafting their limp hand back and forth in front of their face in a vain attempt to create some a cooling air flow.  

They seek out a beach umbrella, covered verandah, or simply the protective branches of a shady tree, out of the sun they so dearly love, and they sit, often accompanied by cool drinks, lathered with swathes of ice, sipped in an effort to do what….. to COOL down! A little hypocritical, don’t you think? Perhaps the sun-worshipers are closet chionophiles at heart?

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A Sunny snowy day – but no heat, thank goodness, in Norway.

Snowball Zermatt

Switzerland  delivers on the Winter Wonderland

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This is one of my favourite Snowy photos. The blue light exudes calmness.

Lunch with Edmund Hilary at 760 metres at MT Cook /Aoraki

Probably not the best place to put my hand for the photo!!

Lunch with Edmund Hilary at 760 metres at MT Cook /Aoraki

Magnificent awe-inspiring Mt Cook – what is not to like?

Lunch with Edmund Hilary at 760 metres at MT Cook /Aoraki

Snow is so much fun! And the reflection is not bad, either.

Lake TekapoNew Zealand Christchurch to Queenstown cont'd

I love the contrast between the stone and the snow here

Of course, my comments are only in fun. (These days in social media platforms, words can be misconstrued so easily!), so I want to make it clear that I am only having a friendly jibe at these sun ‘worshipers.’ For whilst I love the cold and it gives me energy to get about and do three times as much as I would have accomplished on a hot and sultry day, I too crave a bit of a balance. I can be out in the snow all day but do enjoy coming home to a wood fire and a warming cup of cocoa or wine!

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Feeling blue? Not me!!!

I hope you enjoy some of my travel photos from my contented or snowy places! They make me feel cool just looking at them.

Linking to Ailsa’s Travel theme- Snowy

Snowy places are Something I always Ponder About

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Proverbial Thursday – Global Words of Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying, and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

Work is afraid of a skilled worker – Russian Proverb

Bananas, Ballina, Beach, Bangalow and The Big Scrub

Progress always involves risks, you can steal second base and keep your foot on first- Frederick Wilcox
I have not posted a Russian proverb before, and although succinct and to the point, it does give us some food for thought. I see that it encourages endeavor, and a strong work ethic, fortitude and determination. Is that what you get from it?
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Progress is sometimes a sore point with me, when I see historic buildings being torn down in favor of new less aesthetic concrete structures. But progress is essential in our economy. Having said that, progress is not eternally possible in a finite world, so should we re-consider the direction of progress in its western sense?
It seems Frederick Wilcox also had reservations about the risks of progress. What do you make of his quote?

Proverbial sml

Something to Ponder About

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Monday Mystery Photo – Last week Cyprus

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object. I encourage you to leave a comment if you think you might know where this week’s mystery photograph, shown immediately below, is located, or what it is. If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog the following week when the answer will be revealed.

Drop me an email if you would like to submit a photography to Monday Mystery Photo. Guest submissions of MM photos are very welcome.

Here is this week’s photo, selected for you by guest contributor, Millie Thom.

mmpnov14Do you know where this might be located? Tell us in the comments!

Last week’s photo, submitted by Pooja from Stories from Europe  and Pooja tells us,

“Those are impressive sea caves in Ayia Napa, Cyprus. They are naturally formed caves and a popular spot for cliff jumpers, fishermen, photographers and tourists on cruises.”

Thanks so much, Pooja for a great photo! There is more photos from Pooja coming soon.

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There was a range of answers last week. Gerard thought it was Malta or Croatia, MOSY was going for Turkey, and Drake was split between Corsica and Cyprus, finally deciding correctly on Cyprus! Drake from Ledrakenoir solves the puzzle, again. Well done!

NB. This week, I am going to trial holding the comments and approving them manually, thereby releasing them later this week, so if your comment isn’t showing immediately, this is why. It will gives everyone a chance to guess without looking at the already posted comments. 

Everyone then has something to ponder about!

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