Proverbial Thursday – Proverbs and Sayings from around the World

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.  I hope you will, too.

Patience is the key of joy, but haste is the key of sorrow.
-Arabic proverb

Confidence comes not from always being right but from not fearing to be wrong  -Peter T. Mcintyre

Something to ponder about this Thursday

prov thurs9

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Monday Mystery Photo – More clues

Each Monday I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object on my blog. I encourage you to leave a comment, if you think you might know where this week’s mystery photo, was taken. If you guess correctly, I will credit you the following week and post a link to your site/blog. Guest contributions are always welcome.

Last week’s photo was a bit tricky as there are so many places they look similar. Accordingly, I will post another photo below that may give you a clue about this popular summertime holiday destination.

Where in the World is this place?  Ice cream is a favourite here!

Here is a secondary clue from the same location, but a different angle:

mmphoto 25 may

Would anyone dare to hazard a guess?

 

Monday Mystery

Something to Ponder About

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Proverbial Thursday – Proverbs and Sayings from around the World

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.  I hope you will too.

I think today’s offerings relate to age and our attitudes towards it. What do you think?

Alderen kjem ikkje aleine; han fører så mye med seg.

(Age comes not alone; it brings so much with it)

-Norwegian Proverb

“I am not a has-been. I am a will be.” – Lauren Bacall

Proverbial sml

Something to Ponder About

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Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge: Black and White – Trondheim, florals and the sea

A Photography challenge by a new name, but the same fantastic photography challenge, nonetheless. At the same time as Sally’s new title for her ‘phoneography’ challenge, is launched, I have a new smartphone, with much improved photo capabilities, yet to be worked out so, the aging Nexus 4 is the tool behind these:

Trondheim

The Clayton’s Selfie – the act of taking a selfie while desperately trying not to look like a selfie

phonenature

and this:

Edited in Picasacliff boy-001

Also edited in Picasa: IMG_20141023_070543-001

Join us here

Other excellent Monochromatic entries for this week:

http://luciledegodoy.com/2015/05/18/sally-ds-mobile-photography-challenge-black-and-white/

https://sustainabilitea.wordpress.com/2015/05/18/phoneography-and-non-slr-digital-devices-photo-challenge-black-and-white-trees-fog-and-sun/

https://decocraftsdigicrafts.wordpress.com/2015/05/19/sally-ds-mobile-photography-black-and-white/

http://nadinetomlinson.com/2015/05/18/the-cards-we-are-dealt

More photographic challenges to ponder about

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Need a Chocolate Fix? – Chewy Chocolate Slice

Need a chocolate fix in a hurry?

My quick and simple recipe can give you that hit of chocolate you are seeking! And the dark chocolate means there is added health benefits. Dark chocolate aids in preventing heart disease and, is loaded with minerals – read 7 health benefits of chocolate here. After all, we can do with a little indulgence, at times.

And chocolate is good for our mood, isn’t it?

Chewy Chocolate Slice

Chewy Chocolate Slice

1 23 cups sugar

34 cup butter, melted

(you can use margarine too, but I prefer the natural qualities of butter)

2 tablespoons water

2 eggs

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1 13 cups flour

34 cup Baking Cocoa

12 teaspoon baking powder

14 teaspoon salt

Optional: – (to increase decadence and flavour!)

1/2 cup dark cooking chocolate, coarsely chopped (I like to chop this into chunky choc chip sized pieces and grate a little, to sprinkle over the top of the mix as well)

Method:

  1. Preheat oven to 180 ° C and grease a 13 x 9-inch baking pan ( I line the pan with baking paper as well).
  2. Combine sugar, butter, and water in a large mixing bowl.
  3. Stir in eggs and vanilla extract.
  4. Combine flour, cocoa, baking powder, and salt in medium bowl; stir into the sugar mixture.
  5. Fold in chopped dark chocolate
  6. Spread into prepared baking pan.
  7. Sprinkle grated chocolate on top ( optional)
  8. Bake for 20 to 30 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out slightly sticky. Cool completely in pan on wire rack.
  9. Sprinkle with powdered sugar and cut into bars.

Chocolate indulgence is Something I often Ponder About

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Monday Mystery Photo – Last week Leya in Barcelona

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object on my blog. I encourage you to leave a comment, if you think you might know where this week’s mystery photo, was taken. If you guess correctly, I will credit you the following week and post a link to your site/blog. Guest contributions are always welcome.

Where in the world is this:

Last week’s photo, from guest contributor, Ann-Christine at Leya, was the fantastic ceiling of Sagrada Familia – Barcelona , Spain with correct guesses coming from the Master of Something  yet to Discover, Gerard and I suspect: Ledrakenoir. Thanks for your contribution to the Monday Mystery Photo Posts.

Do you have a suitable photo for Monday Mystery Photo? If so, drop me an email. I would be happy to have more contributions.

Last week’s photo:

mm photo may11 Leya179 (2)_copy

 

Monday Mystery

 

Something to Ponder About

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Proverbial Thursday – Proverbs and Sayings from around the World

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.  I hope you will too.

From the bitterness of disease man learns the sweetness of health.
-Catalan Proverb

“The mind will always chatter; but when we refuse to listen or absorb any spews of negativity that it speaks, the chatter will become the voice of our heart which will only speak the truth, from a loving viewpoint, that our mind does not want us to know.”

~ A Window of Wisdom

Something to Ponder About

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Phoneography and Non-SLR Digital Devices Photo Challenge: Macro (Web)

Caught in a Web

Crazy web taken on an aging Nexus 4 –  early one Autumn morning

For other entries or to join click here

Something to Ponder About

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Monday Mystery Photo – Last week Warsaw by Leya

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object on my blog. I encourage you to leave a comment, if you think you might know where this week’s mystery photo, was taken. If you guess correctly, I will credit you the following week and post a link to your site/blog. Guest contributions are always welcome.

mm photo may11 Leya179 (2)_copy

This week’s photo come from Ann-Christine’s fabulous photo vault at Leya.

Where in the world would you find this structure? And what is it?

Last week’s photo also came from guest contributor, Leya, and did mystify most people with Gerard from Oosterman Treats Blog having a couple of great guesses, but the correct answer was still elusive. It was, in fact, a photo of  Warsaw and the old wall surrounding the city – the photo shows ” Barbakan” or “The Barbican” and a rebuilt section of the wall. Thanks so much to Leya for all her contributions to the Monday Mystery Photo Posts.

Leyammphoto

Do you have a suitable photo for Monday Mystery Photo? If so, drop me an email, as I would be happy to have more contributions from a variety of people.

Monday Mystery

Something to Ponder About

 

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Weekly Photo Challenge – Forces of Nature

Coolangatta Australia

Snapper Rocks, Coolangatta, Australia

 

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Forces of Nature.”

In Australia, a country aged by the wind, sun and sea, we see many examples of nature’s work and Forces of Nature.

I am drawn to the sea, as most of us are, who cling to the more hospitable coastal regions of Australia for hearth and home.

The limestone structures that survive, here on Australia’s southern coastline, defy wind, rain, tempest and frothing sea and are an example of natural endurance against the continual pounding of the ocean and are geologically, if not also aesthetically, interesting.

The Arch, Great Ocean Road, Australia

Gog and Magog, Great Ocean Road, Australia

Gog and Magog, Great Ocean Road, Australia

Australia

London Bridge – that fell down stranding tourists

Captured on a very basic Auto focus camera, with the exception of the first photograph, taken with a Nexus 4 and edited with Picasa.

The forces of nature – Something to Ponder About

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Phoneography Challenge – Nature’s Bearded Dragon

Lens and Pens by Sally has a Phoneography  Non-SLR Digital Devices Photo Challenge:

Nature is the theme this week.

lizard

Bearded Dragon at Coolangatta Beach, Australia

Captured (only visually) on the Nexus 4. Slightly adjusted in Picasa.

More entries for this challenge here

Sally also has a link to tips on low key photography which I tried to integrate on the following photograph, previously posted here on this blog:

Cape gooseberry

Capturing nature on my smartphone is something I like to ponder about

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Monday Mystery Photo – Last week Australia

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object on my blog. I encourage you to leave a comment, if you think you might know where this week’s mystery photo, was taken. If you guess correctly, I will credit you the following week and post a link to your site/blog. Guest contributions are always welcome.

This week’s photo come from Ann-Christine’s fabulous photo vault at Leya. Thanks for your contribution to the Monday Mystery Photo Posts.

Where in the World is this photo taken? Can you guess?

Leyammphoto

Last week we were in Queensland at the French Renaissance’s styled State Parliamentary buildings in Brisbane, Australia. Drake from Ledrakenoir guessed correctly the exact location and Gerard from Oosterman Treats Blog accurately identified the city of Brisbane.

IMG_2347

Monday Mystery

Something to  Ponder About

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Monday Mystery Photo – Last week Amritsar, Punjab

Each Monday, ( a little later this week), I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object on my blog. I encourage you to leave a comment, if you think you might know where this week’s mystery photo, was taken. If you guess correctly, I will credit you the following week and post a link to your site/blog. Guest contributions are always welcome.

Where in the World is this photo taken? Can you guess?

IMG_2347

Last week we were in the Punjab city of Amritsar in India – at The Golden Sikh Temple, so ably and promptly guessed by Drake at Ledrakenoir. Well Done!

Founded in 1577 by the fourth Sikh guru, Ram Das, Amritsar is home to Sikhism’s holiest shrine, the spectacular Golden Temple, one of India’s most serene and humbling sights. The same cannot be said for the hyperactive streets surrounding the temple.

Amritsar is divided in two by a tangle of railway lines. The old city, containing the Golden Temple and other historic sights and bound by 12 medieval gates, is southeast of the railway lines. This is a fascinating area to explore, with a capillary network of narrow bazaars that seems to float between the centuries.

To the north of the railway lines, ‘modern’ Amritsar has grown up in haphazard fashion around a scattering of colonial-era boulevards. Gleaming malls and upmarket hotels stand testament to the prosperity of the city, but the hectic traffic makes this area hard to love at street level. Crossing between the old and new cities is best done by cycle-rickshaw, but once you’re in the old city, walking is often the quickest way to get around.

Lonely planet tells me this Sikh temple was founded in 1577 and is surrounded by 12 medieval gates, other historic sites and a capillary network of bazaars that resemble a labyrinth. Read more here

Monday Mystery

Something to Ponder About

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100 YEARS ON- ANZAC DAY – LEST WE FORGET

It is a national holiday observed in every Aussie town, large and small, it is a day so sacred that merchants once required special permission to open their doors, Anzac day and its memorial services, honoring our soldiers, becomes increasingly popular with every passing year, and this year, the 100th anniversary is, by far, the biggest event yet.   IMG_20150425_055230 (Small)

Together with New Zealand, Australia has few non-indigenous traditions and as such, we have clung on to this one event in our history, and made it a tradition observed by young and old alike. The proud, egalitarian, happy-go-lucky spirit, our friendly ‘larrikinism’, our casual “she’ll be right” Australian attitude is epitomized in the ANZAC forces (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps), in WWI.  Anzac memorial services have become a tradition, not because they were a wonderful success, (the original campaign was, in fact, an abject failure, and led to the dismissal of Winston Churchill), but rather because this event has so defined our nation and become entrenched in our psyche and because we, as a nation, need to remember April 25, ANZAC  Day, “Lest We Forget.”

Memorial services are held at dawn, and are attended by millions of  Australians, like me,  across Australia, whether or not they have family members who are military veterans. Why dawn, you might ask? Stand 2, or dawn, is seen by the military, as the best time to launch an offensive strike. Anzac day’s dawn service commemorates the exact time the ANZAC (Australian and New Zealand combined Army Corps), forces attacked the Gallipoli peninsula in the Dardenelles, in Turkey in 1915, 100 years ago.

The most moving tribute of all is the laying of the wreaths on the community monument to the sounds of the Last Post. A truly poigant moment….

A few naysayers think  Anzac day is becoming over-commercialised, but I would rather see this, than forget the sacrifice of those young men and indeed their families who lost loved ones; rather see this than forget the lessons learned in the “war to end all wars”, rather see this than have the general public forget the true meaning of Anzac day altogether and instead think of it as just another day off from work. Pondering the lessons learned in quiet remembrance will ultimately fade away in time without the awareness of the meaning behind the holiday, driven mainly by the media, won’t they?

In almost every suburb in the community, there stands a statue with a soldier (known as a digger – presumably because they dug trenches in which to fight), or that of a light horseman. We owe many things and perhaps, even our liberty, to brave young men who without much thought, willingly signed up to fight someone else’s war. In particular, those that gave the ultimate sacrifice, giving all that they had to give: like my 2 Step Great Uncles that gave their life. My Great Uncle Ted was a Gallipoli veteran who survived the campaign and was left with respiratory problems for the rest of his life, from mustard gas inhalation.

The Gallipoli conflict was not one that involved Australia directly, but rather our allies. So it was due to the strong colonial ties that prevailed at this point in our history, and  the fact that Australia was not permitted, by Britain, to have a fully autonomous military force, that we sent our bravest and strongest young men to fight in the war in Europe. Firstly, to protect the Suez Canal, Churchill then wanted to make a quick strike to knock Turkey out of the war, who was allied with Britain’s enemy, Germany. But how wrong can one get? Very wrong, as it turns out…

Gallipoli, the Turkish Anzac campaign, was a much documented disaster, for which Winston Churchill was entirely to blame. He could not have chosen a worse location: landing troops on a beach under a steep cliff atop where Turkish snipers were waiting to pick them off. The allied forces were forced to withdraw * months later long after the first landing. Churchill was later sacked as Prime Minister.

The Australia population was then around 500,000. Australian casualties for the campaign were 26,111, comprising 1007 officers and 25,104 other ranks. Of these, 362 officers and 7779 men (total 8,141) were killed in action, died of wounds or succumbed to disease. These were our bravest and strongest men, our genetic best, and many were not to return or were to return incapacitated in mind or body. For a young nation struggling to find its feet, their loss was devastating.

Even though the name ANZAC (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) pertained to the original WWI conflict in Gallipoli, the name has become synonymous with military personnel fighting under the Australian and New Zealand flags until they were formerly separated into distinct military forces. And so, the event lives on in our community, with children wearing their father’s medals from conflicts in Vietnam, Korea and Afghanistan, and  younger people wearing their grandfather and great grandfather’s medals, from WWI and WWII, with pride and remembrance.

At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we shall remember them…. Uncle Ted and the others…. lest we forget.

More about the history of Anzac day here:

Significance of ANZAC day from Wiki

Australia

Anzac Day is a national day of remembrance in Australia and New Zealand, and is commemorated by both countries on 25 April every year to honour members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who fought at Gallipoli in Turkey during World War I. It now more broadly commemorates all those who died and served in military operations for their countries. Anzac Day is also observed in the Cook Islands, Niue, Samoa and Tonga.

History

Anzac Day marks the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War.[1] The acronym ANZAC stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, whose soldiers were known as Anzacs. Anzac Day remains one of the most important national occasions of both Australia and New Zealand.[2] This is a rare instance of two sovereign countries not only sharing the same remembrance day, but making reference to both countries in its name.

The Gallipoli campaign

When war broke out in 1914, Australia had been a Federal Commonwealth for thirteen years. In 1915, Australian and New Zealand soldiers formed part of an Allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli Peninsula, under a plan by Winston Churchill to open the way to the Black Sea for the Allied navies. The objective was to capture Istanbul, capital of the Ottoman Empire, an ally of Germany. The ANZAC force landed at Gallipoli on 25 April, meeting fierce resistance from the Turkish Army commanded by Mustafa Kemal (later known as Atatürk). What had been planned as a bold strike to knock Turkey out of the war quickly became a stalemate, and the campaign dragged on for eight months. At the end of 1915, the Allied forces were evacuated after both sides had suffered heavy casualties and endured great hardships. The Allied Gallipoli casualties included 21,255 from the UK, an estimated 10,000 dead soldiers from France, 8,709 from Australia, 2,721 from New Zealand, and 1,358 from British India. News of the landing at Gallipoli made a profound impact on Australians and New Zealanders at home and 25 April quickly became the day on which they remembered the sacrifice of those who had died in war.

Though the Gallipoli campaign failed in its military objectives of capturing Istanbul and knocking Ottoman Empire out of the war, the Australian and New Zealand troops’ actions during the campaign bequeathed an intangible but powerful legacy. The creation of what became known as an “Anzac legend” became an important part of the national identity in both countries. This has shaped the way their citizens have viewed both their past and their understanding of the present.

Anzac Day is a national public holiday and is considered one of the most spiritual and solemn days of the year in Australia. Marches by veterans from all past wars, as well as current serving members of the Australian Defence Force and Reserves, with allied veterans as well as the Australian Defence Force Cadets and Australian Air League and supported by members of Scouts Australia, Guides Australia, and other uniformed service groups, are held in cities and towns nationwide. The Anzac Day Parade from each state capital is televised live with commentary. These events are generally followed by social gatherings of veterans, hosted either in a public house or in an RSL Club, often including a traditional Australian gambling game called two-up, which was an extremely popular pastime with ANZAC soldiers. The importance of this tradition is demonstrated by the fact that though most Australian states have laws forbidding gambling outside of designated licensed venues, on Anzac Day it is legal to play “two-up”.

Despite federation being proclaimed in Australia in 1901, many[who?] argue the “national identity” of Australia was largely forged during the violent conflict of World War I,[9][10] and the most iconic event in the war for most Australians was the landing at Gallipoli. Dr. Paul Skrebels of the University of South Australia has noted that Anzac Day has continued to grow in popularity;[11] even the threat of a terrorist attack at the Gallipoli site in 2004[12] did not deter some 15,000 Australians from making the pilgrimage to Turkey to commemorate the fallen ANZAC troops.[13]

Something Sombre to Ponder About

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Proverbial Thursday – Proverbs and Sayings from around the World

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.  I hope you will too.

Proverbial thursdfly sml 3932“Hunger er den beste kokk”–Hunger is the best sauce –Norwegian Proverb

People are like stained-glass windows. They sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when the darkness sets in their true beauty is revealed only if there is light from within.
Elisabeth Kübler-Ross

and a final anonymous quote, but a very poignant comment on society today:

Hate is easy. Love takes courage.

Something to ponder about today.

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