Proverbial Thursday – Proverbs Quotes and Sayings from Around the World

Proverbial thursdfly sml 3932I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures.

They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something. Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.  I hope you will too.

If you want to go quickly go alone, if you want to go far go together.
African proverb

Janet from This that and the other thing  posted a wonderful quote which she has given me permission to reproduce this week:

The pale stars were sliding into their places. The whispering of the leaves was almost hushed. All about them it was still and shadowy and sweet. It was that wonderful moment when, for lack of a visible horizon, the not yet darkened world seems infinitely greater—a moment when anything can happen, anything be believed in Olivia Howard Dunbar, The Shell of Sense

Something to Ponder About

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About Forestwoodfolkart

Scandinavian culture, literature and traditions are close to my heart, even though I am Australian. I have Scandinavian, Frisian and Prussian/Silesian ancestry and for that reason, I feel a connection with that part of the world. I am an avid Nordic Crime fiction reader, and enjoy photography, writing and a variety of cooking and crafts, and traditional decorative art forms. Politically aware and egalitarian by nature, I have a strong environmental bent.
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11 Responses to Proverbial Thursday – Proverbs Quotes and Sayings from Around the World

  1. milliethom says:

    The African proverb is so true and seems to suggest that friendship and/or companionship is the key. The second quote is just lovely, and I read it a few times just to enjoy it. (I’m still hoping to do some quotes on my blog, but we had no internet in our village all last week (!)so I’m very behind with posting and reading people’s blogs.) I enjoyed your two quotes very nuch.

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    • Thank you, Millie. It is always a pleasure to see a comment on my blog from you! Especially appreciated if you have a problematic internet connection! I do agree with you with today’s words. The African proverb has a few layers that might be initially glossed over but as often is the way with African proverbs, common sense. And the sentences from ‘The Shell of Sense’ are words to drool over! I also have read the passage a few times and each time, I imagine something more. I feel this passage expresses succinctly the way I feel about the time when day suddenly becomes night and the boundaries of possibilities are stretched outwards for a time.

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    • milliethom says:

      You put that so well, Amanda! It’s certainly an intriguing passage – and beautifully descriptive.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Mabel Kwong says:

    I like the second quote a lot, and I think it’s partly because I’m a night person who gets inspiration and feels alert at night. Sure, the world doesn’t stop at night and people do work at night, but it’s always quieter when the sun goes down. Blue hour is my favourite time of the day. Watching the sun go down, we know that we’ve made it through another day…and somehow the sun will still rise again tomorrow and no reason why we can’t try again then after a bit of down time.

    The African proverb was very thought-provoking too. Simple, yet says so much about companionship as you mentioned in your response to Millie. On our own, we can go at our own pace. But go with someone else, not only can we also reach our destination, we also learn a bit more about the people around us and stretch ourselves in our own personal ways…if I’m making sense 😀

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    • You are making absolute sense Mabel! As always a carefully measured and intelligent comment. I was so touched by the quotes this week, particularly the second one when I posted it. I like that you call it the “blue hour” – an apt description. That magical flux between day and night is very special. We are so insignificant to this process and so affected by it. We cannot stop it, it is eternal. caught as we are, in the vortex of the dynamic march of time. Now, I feel like I need to say to you also – if I’m making sense?

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    • Mabel Kwong says:

      Yes, you are making sense, Amanda! Blue hour, indeed it is a magical flux, lasting around ten minutes each evening. A time where it is not bright enough to see clearly, yet not dark enough to be completely blindsided. I think that’s the moment of the day where we feel change is in the air…and we’re powerless to it, powerless to nature.

      And where there’s change, you never know – your dreams might just come true.

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  3. I love the African proverb. Something shared is always multiplied in spirit and in heart.

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