Proverbial Thursday – Global Proverbs

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

irishproverb

Storytelling is the most powerful way to put ideas into the world today.” -Robert McKee

Proverbial Thursday gives you Something to Ponder About

Advertisements

About Forestwoodfolkart

Scandinavian culture, literature and traditions are close to my heart, even though I am Australian. I have Scandinavian, Frisian and Prussian/Silesian ancestry and for that reason, I feel a connection with that part of the world. I am an avid Nordic Crime fiction reader, and enjoy photography, writing and a variety of cooking and crafts, and traditional decorative art forms. Politically aware and egalitarian by nature, I have a strong environmental bent.
This entry was posted in Community, proverbial thursday, Quotes, Sayings, Writing and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Proverbial Thursday – Global Proverbs

  1. Mabel Kwong says:

    Not sure if I get the first quote. “Cured” seems like a vague term to me. Perhaps the quote means whatever that we can’t find and answer for, leave it and perhaps one day everything will resolve itself.

    I thought the second quote was very beautiful. There are a million of stories in the world, and each of us all have a part to play in more strands of stories than we think. There is always a story for each of us. A story that we can relate too – and when we find a story that speaks to us, sometimes we might be inspired to go and make our own stories too.

    Like

  2. I do agree with your interpretation of the first quote. Perhaps we could insert the word “fixed” instead of cured. And well, it is Irish! I thought the second quote was especially pertinent to bloggers, who tell their story through writing or photographs, or art/craft on their blog.

    Like

  3. milliethom says:

    I find the first quote puzzling. It’s almost like saying, if you can’t cure something, leave it alone and it may – or may not – cure itself. It’s a ‘wait and see what happens’ attitude that could be considered as being lazy as much as patient.
    The second quote is interesting, especially as the world is inundated with books nowadays. Thanks to self-publishing, so many writers are sending their ideas around the world. Whether all the ideas are good, useful, or important to know, is a different matter. But even mere entertainment for people is a good thing, and after all, most books will help readers to think about and analyse what they’ve read about. Also, stories, and the ideas embedded in them. are spread via film, TV and radio, newspapers (i.e.the media) and even the various social media. We all love stories, whichever way we like to ingest them.

    Like

    • Well. What can I say about the Irish proverb? It could be interpreted several ways. Firstly, I think it could be interpreted as an apathetic attitude, or, a coping mechanism when there is no possibility of reconciliation in the shorter term, or even a pragmatic approach or advice. The universe has a way of working things out …..eventually and I feel this is the real gist of this quote at least in my mind. However, you would be more familiar with the Irish culture than me. Most people with Irish heritage here were either political rebels or adventure seekers a few generations back!! I suspect not many in these groups had a lot of patience , at first! (Of course, this is a wild generalization, so take it with a grain of salt!!)

      Like

    • milliethom says:

      Like most Celtic peoples, the Irish have a reputation for being hot-tempered, impulsive, adventurous and so on. But that could just stem from the English ideal of staying cool, calm and collected! The Irish also have the reputation of coming out with ‘a bit of the old blarney’ which is just a harmless bit of fun or nonesense. It’s difficult to know how to interpret the quote. I don’t think it’s a bit of fun, and I’m inclined to agree with you, that it’s a way of saying things will work out if they’re just left alone (a point that could also de debated at length!). It’s certainly a thought-provoking one, anyway.

      Liked by 1 person

    • So Celts have this reputation?! I hope you are right about the quote’s meaning as it must have been awful if, historically, they left illness untreated, thinking it might just go away in time.

      Like

    • In addition, Robert Mckee sounds a bit like a modern day Confucius at least in regard to books and stories. This quote is but the tip of the iceberg of what he has written. Have you come across his quotes before, Millie?

      Like

    • milliethom says:

      No, I’ve never come across Robert McKee at all. I think I’ll have to look him up (when I find the time!). I suppose, if his quote is actually taken literally, and we interptet cures as referring to cures for illness, great sadness, death of loved ones etc. I suppose time and patience are the best healers.
      Oh, dear…this quote gives us an awful lot to think about.

      Like

    • You will love the quotes from Robert McKee. Although the one about cures was the Irish proverb! And I think you have nailed the true meaning of the proverb. Lovesickness or homesickness are just the sort of thing the proverb was referring to. Sound advice….

      Like

Comments are closed.