Tantalizing Tuesday – Yema Cake

20160315_134117

Juhls at the Not So Creative Cook posted a recipe that had me intrigued: Yema Cake with a condensed milk frosting. – That sounds different, I thought! A traditional cake from the Philippines: great!

I have made butter icing, royal icing, even cream cheese icing, but never condensed milk icing, so I decided I had to make it for Lin’s recipe challenge.

20160314_194345

Yema cake  is a traditional Filipino recipe and often eaten with Yema Balls: sweet balls of condensed milk goodness, rolled in sugar!! Wow!! My kids would have loved these when they were younger and thought it was a great sugar-fix especially with Easter so close!

YemaBalls

Source: Not So Creative Cook

However, they are now older and a cake is more eagerly received, so my contribution for the challenge will simply be the oh- so- divine texture of Yema Cake.

The cake itself has a sponge like texture and looks very similar to a sponge or Madeira cake. Jhuls called the base a ‘Chiffon cake’ and it does feel a little like a soft light texture on one’s palette! I pretty well stuck to the Yema cake recipe posted below, apart from two small variations. The first, a variation in cooking times that can probably attributed to my oven/cooktop’s fastidious ways, and secondly, when it came to the frosting, me being me, I couldn’t resist adding a bit more lemon juice to the mix.

So what did I think of the cake?

If truth be told, before I was able to add the frosting, half of it disappeared down my family’s gob!!! [embarrassing smile]

The frosting itself is quite rich: it is, after all made with condensed milk, and whilst this is a bit rich for my liking, those who are condensed milk fans will absolutely love it.

Jhuls recommended cooking the frosting for 30 minutes but I found it was set and thickened after 10-15 minutes, no matter how low the thermostat on my stove was set.

Rating:  10/10 – A winner!

20160314_194414

The remainder left – ready for frosting!

YEMA Cake Recipe

[Source: Not so Creative Cook]
  • Servings: Yield one 10-inch cake

Ingredients:

For the Chiffon Cake:

  • 1¼ cup cake flour**
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 4 eggs (yolk and white separated)
  • ½ cup evaporated milk
  • ¼ cup olive oil or canola oil
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • ½ tsp cream of tartar

For the Yema Frosting:

  • 1 14-oz. can condensed milk
  • ½ cup evaporated milk
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 3 Tbsp butter, softened
  • 1 tsp fresh lemon juice

Instructions:

Ed’s note: ** As I don’t have access to cake flour, I removed 1 1/4 tablespoon of flour from the flour and replaced this with cornflour. 

For the cake:

  1. Slightly grease one 10″ round baking pan. Preheat oven to 350ºF. [I used a silicone mould lined on the base with baking paper – Ed]
  2. In a bowl, mix flour, ½ cup sugar, baking powder and salt until well combined. Make a well in the middle and add the egg yolks, milk, oil and vanilla. Whisk until smooth. In another bowl, combine 4 egg whites and cream of tartar. Using a mixer on high speed, mix until soft peaks begin to form. Gradually add the remaining ¼ cup of sugar and continue mixing on high speed until the mixture forms stiff peaks.
  3. Fold in the meringue (egg white mixture) into the flour-yolk mixture until well combined. Pour mixture over the prepared baking pans. Bake in preheated oven for 25 -28 minutes [my oven took 35 minutes to cook the cake – Ed] or until cake tester/toothpick, inserted in the middle, comes out clean.
  4. Remove from oven and allow to cool down in pan for about 10 minutes. Remove from pan and transfer on a wire rack. Allow to completely cool down.

For the frosting:

  1. In a saucepan, mix all ingredients using a whisk until well combined. Cook with constant stirring over low heat for 30 minutes or until thick and spreadable.
  2. Remove from heat and allow to cool down.

Moldiv_1458041627476

To assemble:

Carefully cut the cake into two even layers. Place the first layer on a cake dish. Spread about 3/4 cup frosting on top. Put the second layer on top. Spread the remaining frosting on the top and sides of the cake. Using a fork, create lines on the frosting. Sprinkle your choice of toppings, or you can just without.

20160315_134117

Yema Cake – Good to eat whilst Pondering About Something

Tantalizing Tuesdays

Check out Lin’s recipe exchange here

Advertisements

About Forestwoodfolk

Scandinavian culture, literature and traditions are close to my heart, even though I am Australian. I have Scandinavian, Frisian and Prussian/Silesian ancestry and for that reason, I feel a connection with that part of the world. I am an avid Nordic Crime fiction reader, and enjoy photography, writing and a variety of cooking and crafts, and traditional decorative art forms. Politically aware and egalitarian by nature, I have a strong environmental bent.
This entry was posted in Cakes, Community, Cooking, Traditions and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

17 Responses to Tantalizing Tuesday – Yema Cake

  1. Jhuls says:

    Wow! I am so happy now!! Thank you so much and I am so honored.
    I can’t blame you on the frosting! 😀 This is so delicious and I am craving for some now. I think I am going to make this, too. 😀 x

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Simply Della says:

    I should definitely try this…I am a yema baby 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. gloasdfghjkl says:

    I have to try this! ^^

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Sounds super delicious indeed ! Looks great 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Pingback: The Recipe Exchange: Lina’s Chicken Parcels | thenotsocreativecook

  6. milliethom says:

    This cake looks wonderful! Does the word ‘yema’ mean the same thing as ‘chiffon’? Chiffon brings ‘light and cliff’s to mind. And the condensed milk frosting does sound interesting. It’s years since I used condensed milk in anything. I intend to give this one a try, as soon as I have the time. 😀

    Like

    • Hey, Millie!!! Apparently in Hindi Yema means: Our joy! In Spanish and Filipino it literally means yolk! I guess from all the egg yolks in the recipe! I will be interested to see how you find it. Like you, I rarely use condensed milk these days. I only used to use it in fudge, or a caramel slice, but there always seems to be a tin in the cupboard.

      Like

    • milliethom says:

      I definitely intend to give it a go – it looks really good. As for condensed milk, I have two tins in my cupboard, as well as a couple of tins of evaporated milk, that I’ve had for yonks. They’re probably all well past their ‘use by’ date by now.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Possibly, but I suspect you will know when you open them if they are okay. Evaporated milk is what I use to make white sauces these days. Much better for my family’s digestion.

      Like

    • milliethom says:

      Sometime this coming week I’m going to make this cake. My condensed milk is fine and I have all the other ingredients. I’m looking forward to trying it!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Great!! I can’t wait to hear how it goes!!!

      Like

    • milliethom says:

      I’ll be sure to let you know. It will probably be around mid-week.

      Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.