Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdom

The beautiful Hunter Valley NSW, Australia

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too.

 

Until lions learn to tell their tale, the story of the hunt will always glorify the hunter  – African Proverb

 

I am not a fan of the Harry Potter stories, but the following quote contains good advice:

 

‘It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might has well not have lived at all, in which case you have failed by default.’

  – Joanne Kathleen Rowling

J.K. Rowling experienced failure, yet she persisted in trying and at last, she got lucky.

Is the glorious hunter reliving his interpretation of the experience, based on his life, values and senses, or might wishful thinking be clouding his judgement of events? Would the lion’s perspective be any different?  What is your interpretation?

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Proverbial Thursday – Something to Ponder About

 

 

 

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About Forestwoodfolk

Scandinavian culture, literature and traditions are close to my heart, even though I am Australian. I have Scandinavian, Frisian and Prussian/Silesian ancestry and for that reason, I feel a connection with that part of the world. I am an avid Nordic Crime fiction reader, and enjoy photography, writing and a variety of cooking and crafts, and traditional decorative art forms. Politically aware and egalitarian by nature, I have a strong environmental bent.
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10 Responses to Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdom

  1. Mel & Suan says:

    We like to interpret the quote of the lion as: until the perspective of the lion is shared with us, we won’t know what was in the mind of the lion who was doing the hunting. The feeling of failure as prey was alerted. The agony of an escaped prey…
    We are all in the same shoes as Rowling, and if we chose to live too cautiously we will surely have failed by default!

    Liked by 1 person

    • J.K. Rowling refers to the common fear we all have: failure. We detest it, yet we can learn so much from it. Some of us can even lose interest in growth as a person, for fear of making a mistake, and become reclusive, safe in the zone of no challenges and no adventures, but also no mistakes, and no failure. Yet what Rowling says is true, as you concurred, Mel & Suan To live a overly cautious life is categorical failure!

      Interesting to offer another perspective of the lion being the hunter as opposed to the prey. The lion may indeed then have a very interesting story to tell. The trophy hunter on the other hand is all about glorification of the hunt, regardless of the circumstances. The agony indeed of a half wounded animal, left to slowly die. Such a terrible thing! I could never bring myself to shoot these majestic creatures. How about you?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mel & Suan says:

      Living cautiously does have its merits. If for example one lives in a country like North Korea, where being different could be risky…but for the rest of us, well it would be such a shame!
      The lion certainly has a lot to tell, since not every hunt will be successful. Heard its more like 1 in 10 success rate of ambush.
      We don’t condone hunting at all! Though we enjoy shooting – at clay targets!

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  2. Chris Riley says:

    I just took each quote at simple face value, and loved them both.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Mabel Kwong says:

    I interpreted the Africa proverb in a different way from what you suggested. I thought it was talking about someone taking all the credit for something someone else had a part to play in too. Animals are very grand creatures, but they contribute so much to this earth that we live in – think of the food chain and different species. Hunters are part of the human race, and often with the human race triumphs are seen as a mark of success. It’s not something I necessarily agree with as I believe that all of us have a story to tell and we are all important in our own way. I’m not sure if I’m explaining this clearly, but I hope you get what I mean.

    I’m not a huge Harry Potter fan but I did enjoy reading the books and watching the films while growing up. Failure sets up to reflect on ourselves and helps us to look at the broader picture. It may not usually be a good feeling, but it’s a feeling that often makes us realise we’re not the best in this world – and I think that’s where the first quote comes in. As cliched as this sounds, failure is a lesson in disguise and it tells us to slow down in many ways.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hijacking someone else’s story or moment of glory is a sign of a weak self-esteem. This may be a case of someone’s wishful thinking but changing or embellishing the facts of a story can only delude oneself to the real truth and the real self. Like you, Mabel, I believe everyone is important and each of us has a story to tell. I also believe that those who distort the truth and focus on, or only tell a side of their story, in which they are supreme, are frightened of failure. For me, this is the tie in to the quote. However, each of us also have the capacity to interpret things in an individual way and the other side’s story can equalize or clarify. Animals are dominated by humans so there is an unequal power differential here.If an animal could talk, would their side of the story be more truthful?

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    • Mabel Kwong says:

      I think sometimes we don’t want to believe the story that’s happening right here, right now – could be because we feel we deserve better, or we are just delusional and refuse to accept reality because of pride.

      It would be amazing if animals could talk, and there would be so many more perspectives. But as you mentioned, how we see and feel a story is often a result of what we know, based on personal experience. There’s a degree of bias to each and every opinion.

      Liked by 1 person

    • And that bias is the basis of many problems and conflicts in the world. It is a great shame we can’t recognise and accept that, working with it rather than taking offence.

      Liked by 1 person

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