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Embracing Edamame Beans

As one on the periphery of the ‘Boomer’ generation, I am slightly hesitant to use nouveau cuisine ingredients in my meals. However, as my adult children grow and in-laws arrive at family dinners, I need to cater to vegan, coeliac and pescatarian palettes, so I’m aiming to be versatile, making some low-calorie alternatives such as Edamame-fritters. Add to that, organic and Vegan menu options are appearing in lunch venues across the country, so the heat is on to keep up!

Yesterday, I dined on a wonderful dish of Edamame and Avo Smash comprising Mixed Beets, Beetroot Hommus, roasted hazlenut dukkah and plant based marinated feta, on toasted sourdough. It was delicous and the combination of colour made me remember my kindergarten days! It looked fantastic.

Edamame beans are immature soybeans and mostly found in Asian style dishes so using an unfamiliar ingredient such as this usually has me reaching for a recipe. Today, that wasn’t necessary.

Two cans of Edamame beans were looking a little lost and unwanted in my pantry and avocados are currently in plentiful supply and contain the good fats, so I seized the opportunity to recreate my own version of the Edamame and Avo Smash for lunch – sans mixed beets and hazlenut dukkah. I could hardly wait to eat it, as indicated by the missing bite in the photograph!

Do you use embrace new and unfamiliar ingredients in your cooking?

Edamame Beans Nutritional Content

They contain protein, but they also contain carbohydrates, that all important fibre, a number of essential amino acids and of course they’re low in fat and sugar and contain no cholesterol at all. They’re also a great source of minerals, including iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, zinc, phosphorus, copper and manganese, plus they pack a punch with the vitamins too, such as Vitamin C, riboflavin, thiamine, niacin, Vitamin B6 and Vitamin E. Shelled, they weigh in at 110 calories for a 100 gram portion.

http://www.kobejones.com.au/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-humble-edamame-bean/

The Little Tree Bake and Brewhouse nestled in the Samford Valley, to capital city Brisbane’s west, sources and incorporates local and sustainable produce into their seasonal menus. Everything on their menu is bespoke, made from scratch in our kitchen and very own bakery.

Photo Credit: http://www.littletreebakeandbrewhouse.com.au/

106 thoughts on “Embracing Edamame Beans”

  1. YESSSSSSSssss !! – edamame beans. DEE-lishus ! I was introduced to ’em a while ago, and took to them instantly. Mind you, I haven’t set eyes on any in greengrocery shops or sections; so it seems there are not too many people producing them. Probably still growing the soy beans for major distribution.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I found some in the frozen section at Woolies and canned varieties when you find the canned corn kernels and vegetables. But I have but found them fresh, so far! Glad you like them. They seem quite versatile? How do you have them?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh, as a ‘side’ salad on their own with a gentle vinaigrette; but with very finely-chopped green parts of spring onions. Much as with FRESH borlotti beans !

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Looks lovely! I get anxious using ingredients I haven’t used before: like do I have to prepare them, can you get food poisoning if prepared wrong, etc. I’m not a very good or keen cook. So I applaud you for trying things so bravely!

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Well, One always learns something. I never even heard about edamame beans until now. It reads and sounds almost like a type of cheese.
    Thanks for the info. Next time I am having coffee with my group of friends I will casually ask; How do you prepare dishes with edamame beans?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Yes, guests sure can test our culinary skills these days. I have a vegan grandson and his girlfriend, and up until recently, my daughter, (grandsons mum) was eating Keto. That was a hard one to balance together. Fortunately my daughter wasn’t rigid, so a bowl of gado, gado with optional eggs, and plenty of peanuts seem to make the best option for coming close to satisfying the dietary requirements. Makes me wonder if people in Central Africa have such food intolerances. For most in that region, food, any food at all would be most welcome.
    Edamame beans are a staple in my cupboards to for plant based protein in meals. I enjoy them too.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I am a little surprised but pleased to hear that Edamame is one of your staples, but then you have had some opportunities for experimentation, especially the keto dish. Now I have to ask what is gado? Moreover, who makes eggs optional? Lol – this is coming from an egg lover, though!
      I think food intolerances have increased in prevalence in recent decades and my theory is that all the heavily processed food has damaged our guts, or else the good bacteria has been stripped out and we cannot process certain foodstuffs any more.
      As for Africa, I am supposing that in rural villages, there is no such offering of fast or convenience food, and less sugar, so their guts might be in better shape to tolerate a range of foodstuffs. Sound plausible?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes definitely a plausible explanation. Gado Gado is a mix of salad and lightly steamed vegetable, usually topped with a boiled egg. The dressing is warm satay sauce and the dish is sprinkled with peanuts. At least that’s how I make it. Any veges can go it, I particularly like to slice a cold leftover jacket potato in it, and steamed green beans go well to, as does a can of edamame. It’s a very adaptable dish for all sorts of diet restrictions.I think it’s Indonesian.

        Liked by 1 person

          1. For the satay sauce I mix some peanut paste with coconut cream, a shake of soy sauce and add a bit of hot to taste from whatever I have available. The hot might come from Thai curry past, or dried chilli flake, or sometimes from lime pickle – if the moth doesn’t like hot, just leave it out altogether. It’d still taste yummie I’m sure.

            Liked by 1 person

  5. I really like edamame but don’t have it very often. Somehow, I’ve never gotten into the habit of eating, but this post might just be the push I need. That last picture is so lovely and tranquil.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The last photo is from the cafe, Laurie. It certainly did have a laid back, natural vibe. My friend asked for a takeaway container as having had gastric surgery she can’t eat a complete meal atm, and they obliged, giving her a non-plastic, ecofriendly bowl with lid!
      They also had a range of delicious home made relishes and jams! Yum.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. If you have never cooked with Edamame, it is something new to try, if you wish, Sarah! Once upon a time I would cook lentils and other pulses from scratch, but truly, those days are over. Unless some of the vegos/alternate diets in-laws are visiting. The Moth doesn’t like it. His preferred diet is very maintstream.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. I love edamame beans from snacking. I get them frozen in the pods and cook them briefly in salted boiling water. To eat, it’s like eating peanuts from the shell and truth be told, taste more nut-like than pea-like.

    I have never seen edamame in cans but I haven’t looked for them there either.

    Beetroot hummus is new to me – I’ve not seen it before. Do Aussie’s generally like beetroot? I think it has a very particular appeal & I don’t know a lot of people that eat it regularly here. The most unusual burger I’ve ever had is an Aussie special with pickled beetroots & fried egg on top of the beef patty. The first bite was a surprise. Ashamed to say that I removed the pickle before my second bite 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oh no! You removed the pickle from the burger? Well you would have company with the Moth, as he does the same. I love the pickle, so I have his pickle quota and mine as well.
      Yes we Australians always have beetroot on a burger. It isn’t a burger without beetroot! Which is why I have never liked McDonald’s offerings, amongst other reasons. I am a bit partial to beetroot – I blame some German/north European genes. Beetroot has made a comeback in recent times. Health shops have always had it raw/boiled and grated on salad sandwiches for flavour and it is a staple at mainstream barbeques. Hommus made it on the scene here with the arrival of the Lebanese community and Lebanese cuisine – kebab shops are everywhere. It has now become mainstream. I always make my own Hommus at Christmas time using Tahini – sesame seed paste which is also mainstream here, now. I haven’t made beetroot hommus from scratch but assume it is just adding cooked beetroot to the hommus mix. You should try it Sandy. Beetroot hommus or hommus itself has a nice flavour – at least I think so. Hommus has a nutty flavour and a great substitute for using butter on breads. I have a friend who was in the South African army and all he was given to eat at times was canned beetroot, so he can’t stand the stuff. This SA/Aussie couple were also surprised when my kids gobbled up canned, pickled beetroot. (I must confess I can eat that straight out of the tin!) But then I do like anything that has been pickled. It must be why I like Polish cuisine. They are great picklers! Lol.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I chuckled when I read this, as I was literally spreading hummus on my tortilla wrap. I know hummus very well, especially now that hubby has a mostly vegetarian diet.
        I agree that pickles make the burger but it’s regular dill or bread&butter pickles for me. Beetroot is an acquired taste and I can’t get past the minerally flavor. If we ever meet up in Australia, I will definitely hand off my beetroot pickle to you – along with the raw onions which I cannot abide. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Haha! Snap! Regular dill and bread and butter pickles is nice too! I do like the dill pickles. Not so keen on the old fashioned mustard pickles though. Beetroot is minerally due to the vinegar – maybe you could try it grated raw and see if you like it. Great in salad/vege patties etc.

          Liked by 1 person

      1. Amanda, thanks. With our kids, we have had vegetarian periods, pescatarian periods, and no beef periods, so we are used to eating different things. Thank goodness we did not go vegan, as we love our eggs and cheese. Keith

        PS – There was a time when my daughter would only eat Chick-Fil-A sandwiches, a fast food restaurant here.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Oh Gosh. Chick Fil A sandwiches sound terrible. Good to know she moved on from that. Eggs and cheese are pretty good. I think I could live solely on berries, bread, eggs and seafood.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Amanda, the Chick-Fil-A sandwiches are actually pretty good, just bad for you with the accompanying fries and fried chicken piece. We love our breads, potatoes, rice, pasta – all those carb loaded white foods. When my wife got us on a low carb diet, we lost a lot of weight, but missed those foods, We now eat them in moderation. Keith

            Liked by 1 person

            1. It is hard to not eat too many carbs, but I try not to have too much later in the day. So I have only a small portion of carbs for dinner. Bread does seem to put the weight on so I minimise that by having an open sandwich rather than a traditional one.

              Liked by 1 person

              1. Wise strategy. What is the old saying – eat like a queen for breakfast, like a princess for lunch and a pauper for dinner – in terms of carbs, I would say.

                Liked by 1 person

    1. Avocado is something my Mother loved eating. As a child, I thought it was completely disgusting. The colour threw me off. But then gradually I had it a little bit in salads and it became something I like the more I have it. As I said, one of those acquired tastes. It has taken off in recent times, because it has the good cholesterol, doesn’t it? And gives flavour to bland low salt diets.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. My Mother in law used to make some tasty edamame as a side dish and I used to buy some dried edamame with various seasonings – but have not eaten any for years — and it sound sleek you are a great hostess to think of the various needs for your guests – even though I am a person that thinks people are too quick to remove meat frothier diet while they gobble up sugars, too many grains, and industrial oils (like canola and vegetable) that are bad for the human gut.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yes I do think sugar is a bad idea for the gut. Issues with too many grains seem to overlap the allergy factor I think. I find eating too many fibre rich foods give me IBS, when it should help with that. Canola was everywhere 20 years ago, but now Olive oil seems to be the only prevalent oil in our stores.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. oh that is good that olive oil is everywhere – really good – and the issue with sugar is that it doe sore than impact gut health 0 it stops immune function and also can feed pathogens and so if anyone is sick – they really should be told to use stevia and try to to cleanse and get off foods with sugars – especially until the gut heals
        – and not to rant about health topics – but anyone with IBS should consider going grain free and a few other things that could rally help with all digestive health (like easy enemas – not the bag kind of thing – but the sore bought bottles – emptied – and then add a tiny bit of coffee – or lemon juice – or baking soda – and do these easy enemas to help remove years of build up and help that area in other ways – and again – this likely is not the place for more of this chat so email me if you ever want to know a few more ideas – because I know a thing or two about digestive health and repairing the gut – not necessarily for IBS – but I kph many folks that have helped that with the easy enemas. In fact, last December – mentioned it to a 30-year old in FL and she told me that within in three days of doing just simple coffee enemas her entire body felt lighter and she had no idea it would have such an immediate impact)

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    1. This seems to be the way a lot of people have discovered Edamame beans, Sarah. Yet I have not eaten them this way. That is something I have yet to discover. I am glad you liked them and thank you for stopping by.

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  8. I don’t think I’ve ever had edamame in any other form except straight from the pods!
    This is such a fabulous idea – the combination of flavours, colours and textures!!!! Yum … I can taste it already!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you yet again for the inspiration – although edamame is not new to me, it certainly is a new way to eat it. I will explore whether they come in the shelled form so that it’s easier to mash it up (otherwise more will end up being eaten than popped out to be used).

        Liked by 1 person

            1. Hehe! It is funny that we can know a person through words and not ever have met in person! This is what I mean about blogging. When we, if ever, get to meet a blogger you have been communicating with irl, it is like meeting up with an old family friend. You seem to already have bypassed many unknowns. Just like when I met Ineke in New Zealand, it was like we just connected on a deeper level instantly, after communicating via comments on our posts.

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              1. It is amazing, isn’t it? But I guess we shouldn’t be so surprised as many of us choose to share pretty personal things about ourselves through our posts – I actually feel very privileged to be part of this community, and through the years when BlogFriends leave, I miss them terribly.

                Liked by 1 person

              2. I agree. It is like losing a good buddy, especially when they just disappear. It is a shame Lorelle gave up writing. She was an inspiration to me.

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              3. She is a beautiful person, but had just lost her writing mojo and intent. Perhaps she might start again if we are ever able to travel. Without that to write about, I think she just gave up. She received a lot of discounts on travel and free stuff as a blogger, and without that, maybe she didn’t have too much else to write about? But such a lovely lady. I remember meeting her in Melbourne, such a warm, smiley person. So positive.

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