Australia

Father’s day Covid Jab #1

I could have been anyone with access to my name and date of birth which the clinic happened to have entered incorrectly. No ID or Medicare card check was requested; I just walked in, gave my name, waited in the queue, then had the jab.

22nd August 2005,” some family member screamed out to a young man waiting in the queue. Who doesn’t know their own birth date, I wonder?

Despite the increasing crowd of 50 or more, I noted that only myself and one other person checked into the medical centre, via the Covid contact tracing app!

The nurse’s technique was textbook, yet her initial screening questions were vague. “Any serious conditions?” she asked in a lovely African accent. I could have done a tad better job at the questions, even with my outdated medical knowledge. Perhaps the Covid jab training is somewhat abridged?

Sheep-like, I followed the arrows on the path to an external waiting area, read: car park. A car park for people, one without patient engagement or monitoring, save by two attendants up front that were not in my direct line of sight chatting to each other.

I decided to set my own timer for 15 minutes lest I be sitting there all day.

I noted that there were no list of side effects handed out, either. (Perhaps it was an environmental initiative and they were trying to save the trees?) I have to give them the benefit of the doubt.

I’ve heard of better organization at the Government health hubs, so bearing in mind this was a private seven-day medical clinic, I’d have to say the efficiency of numbers through the door was the paramount driver here.

Given Australia is in a race against time in terms of Covid, atm, the Government presumably thinks it is imperative to get as many folks jabbed as possible. Not that I disagree with that. For them, it is about image not health.

With the Corona Delta variant raging down south, unchecked by casual restrictions of an economics-only minded government that sings the mantra of, “we now have to learn to live with Covid,” – I prefer to be jabbed asap.

Once again I observe that I am still not in the line of sight of the attendants. If I fainted or fell asleep on my chair, would anyone notice?

In the time it has taken me to write up this post,  I calculated I am now free to leave – by my own measurement. Not a clock in sight. 15 minutes are up according to the timer on my watch.

I am off to enjoy the rest of my Sunday. It is Father’s Day here.

I hope you enjoy yours too.

97 thoughts on “Father’s day Covid Jab #1”

        1. Why is the Vaccine availability been a problem, Sandy? The Government dragging its hind quarters. It backed the wrong horse, going for two of the cheapest vaccines, one was defunct another didn’t work out as it was giving false positives for HIV, and the A/Z which had problems. They dragged their feet ordering the rest. Meanwhile the public showed they wanted alternatives and then there were the clotting problems. They tell us to go and get jabbed but available appointment could be three months away! They should have moved to order more 18 months ago, just like the quarantine facilities. The Prime MInister is heavily religious and his devotion didn’t guide him to be practical. Now we are paying the price when the rest of the world is vaccinated.

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          1. All countries have different approaches to managing Covid but itseemed to me that Australia took an unusually passive stand. I thought maybe because it was because you’d closed the borders & had a controlled infection rate. I hadn’t realised that the vaccination supply was a problem. It must be very frustrating for you all.

            btw. I was confused with your story timeline. In Canada we celebrate Fathers Day in July. I was wondering why you’d relayed the story two months after the fact ๐Ÿ™‚

            Liked by 1 person

            1. Yes, we celebrate Fathers day the first Sunday in September and I remember being surprised when you wrote about it a short time ago!
              Mothers day is second sunday in May – is that the same for you?
              On our passive stand against Covid. Geography made it easy to close our borders, and the public liked that approach and the slacko government thought there was no rush to vaccinate. As the variants appeared and gathered momentum, they realised that they had to do something and in the meantime, Delta snuck in – the whole country’s outbreak is from just one person who was an unvaccinated driver of a pilot returning from an overseas flight who later tested positive. The driver did not wear a mask. Perhaps this drama could have bene avoided somewhat…

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              1. Mother’s day is the same here, second Sunday in May. Father’s Day is the third Sunday in June. I guess the fathers are more needy in this part of the world ๐Ÿ˜‰

                Your story about the unvaccinated driver is remarkable in its level of detail in traceability. I remember thinking the same with the other Aussie outbreak which was traced back to the hotel worker who was also a pizza delivery guy. Either we don’t have as good a traceability as you guys or our public health officials don’t want to broadcast it. Anyways, I think a breakout of a variant was inevitable and it’s unfortunate that those in charge didn’t acknowledge it. Whether we like it or not, globally we are connected and what happens in one part of the world, will affect the other part.

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              2. Our contact tracers and investigators do an excellent job, but it is because we have such a small number of cases that they can do so. Sharp reactive lockdowns give the contact tracers time to do their work and isolate close contacts, before they infect others. When there was an outbreak involving a school child here, the entire school, families and close contacts- 1000’s, self isolated into home-quarantine for 14 days. Surgeries at the local hospital has to be cancelled and postponed as many of the medicos’ and anaethetists’ kids went to that particular school and so they were prevented from carrying out operations for 2 weeks. One hospital had difficulty finding a heart surgeon who was not in quarantine, one day, for an emergency procedure that needed to be carried out, but managed to find someone in the end. This sort of hard lockdown worked to halt the sudden outbreak and means we are still free to move around atm. Unfortunately Sydney did not lock down, but suggested people stay at home and the outbreak then spread with numbers far too high now to effectively trace all close contacts, so it continues unabated with numbers increasing daily..

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    1. Exactly. I have no proof that I have had the jab, Jo, so just have to trust their record keeping skills. I feel better equipped to handle a large scale community outbreak.

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          1. This is Carol! And after your second appointment your vaccination certificate will be there too. You can download it on your phone via the app and print it if you want via the website. I’m very relieved now that I’ve had both and have the paperwork to prove it. ๐Ÿ™‚

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            1. So sorry Carol! I always confus you and Lingo in Transit! (You are both from down south!) Thanks for clarifying my poor memory!
              So the first jab doesn’t show up in the website?

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              1. Do you mean on Medicare? Mine did. Not sure how quickly though because I didn’t look straight away. But by the time I got home from the second one I had a notification to say my certificate was ready to download. And I’m in Toowoomba! ๐Ÿ˜„

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              2. Toowoomba is south and a little west of me! Thanks again for the hint. I will check after the second appointment.
                Are you enjoying the Carnval of Flowers. I must be up there to see the show if we don’t go into another lockdown.

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              3. I think of Victoria as “down south” ๐Ÿ˜€ The Carnival hasn’t really started yet, although some events will get underway this week. I will visit some of the competition gardens later in the month.

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              4. True – they are the deep south. The floral displays are open all month, is that right? Which ones are you planning to visit? I would love some recommendations.

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              5. The public gardens will be open – Queen’s Park, Laurel Bank Park and the Japanese Garden. The competition gardens open from 17th, I think. Any of those will be beautiful. Maps should be online or available at the tourist information in James Street.

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    1. Yes Anne, it does give you some feeling of protection from a more serious version of the illness. How are things in your neck of the woods? No Delta variant?

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  1. Good on you but that is not how I would like to be treated either. They can’t train them fast enough to keep up with the 24hr 7 day a week jobs. The only bit you got wrong is the “Given this is a race against time in terms of Covid in Australia atm, it is imperative to get as many folks jabbed as possible. That must be on their minds!”
    What is on their mind is they have to get the numbers up to make the PM look good as they would be pushed to get a lot done from management and politicians
    Enjoy the rest of the day and hope you are feeling OK Amanda ๐Ÿ™‚

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    1. I thoroughly agree with that assertion, Brian. It is all marketing as far as Slowmo is concerned! This practice must have answered the call for numbers not professional manner and accountability. Still, I suppose not too much with go wrong with today’s efforts. At least I got the jab a month earlier than planned.

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  2. That’s interesting. Our little rural clinic was very well organized and passed us through the process easily. We got reminders for the second jab and a vaccination card at the end of the process, though for reasons that escape me, it was big enough that I couldn’t possibly fit comfortably in anyone’s wallet. But since that’s my only complaint, I really have nothing to complain about!

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    1. Yours was the kind of experience, the state Government clinics give here, Graham. This was a private clinic. So much for private practice doing things better. The free market doesn’t always do things better, but it was quantity not quality!
      I am glad you have got the jab. What are the stats like in the islands? Are you under any restrictions?

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      1. We have more cases now than at any time previously. There’s talk about shutting things down again, but the problem is not really visitors, it’s returning residents and locals not taking any kind of responsibility for their actions. This was always likely if the virus got a foothold here, but I think the Delta variation’s easier transmission, has exposed the lack of care people are taking.

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        1. It is a shame we didn’t have the Delta variant first as people were more vigilant then. It is social distance and mask fatigue we are seeing after a few days of relative safety without cases, so I can imagine a similar thing is happening over there. It is the foolish few who spoil it for the responsible many. This is human nature – unfortunately.

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  3. Interesting to hear the laid-back approach to overseeing vaccines up your way. In Canberra, even supermarkets, chemists and the like have someone at the entrance to ensure the covid app has been used.

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    1. I guess it is more of an imperative down your way. Things tighten up when there is a community outbreak. I am not a fan of the laid back approach. We had a positive case of a truck driver on the south side and when he advised he visited a shopping centre in Beenleigh, it was stated that they only had one check in that day! Scary…

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      1. That is scary. The ACT has been super compliant since the outbreak in Sydney. We are surrounded by New South Wales so it was inevitable it would get here. Being cautious has paid off so far.

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  4. Really appreciate that you took the vaccine despite how disorganised it was. Here in India, about 50% of the population are atleast partially vaccinated (a BIIIG number, given our population) and there definitely has been a little dip in the cases. Hope the world heals soon! ๐Ÿ™‚

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    1. Well done to India getting half your immense population vaccinated. Unfortunately our national government has been so slow to organize the arrival and distribution of vaccines. They stuffed up and we have had to wait til now and the latest Delta variant outbreak has finally made them panic a little and get the ball rolling with the vaccines.
      So good to hear that there is a dip in cases over your way with the vaccinations. Imagine if we can get everyone vaccinated super quick, we might be able to stamp out the virus before it mutates again…..But Africa is a problem in terms of getting vaccines and distributing them too. Poverty, distance etc…

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      1. Oh, yes, I think about Africa too. A huge continent with many impoverished countries. My country did something stupid initially: they exported a million vaccines to CANADA when they could have helped much poorer countries or even some neighbours! If we are all vaccinated, covid could be stamped out indeed. In India, vaccination is yet to begin for children under 18. I am to turn 18 in 8 days and Iโ€™m fully vaccinated. Is Australia vaccinating children now?

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        1. They are talking about vaccinating children now that Moderna vaccine is on its way. They haven’t vaccinated anyone under 18 years. You are lucky.
          I suppose your Government saw the need in Canada was higher at the time and thought they might do a swap later when Covid hit your country. I believe we just swapped some with Singapore, meaning that we got some of theirs NOW, whilst we will have to give them back some in return in December.
          Well done on being a young blogger!

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  5. Yeah! Amanda, itโ€™s great youโ€™ve had your first jab! At least you had some sunshine to enjoy whilst waiting! I had mine in the midst of winter amidst ice and snow. Itโ€™s good you feel a sense of security… although definitely seems the organisation is lacking and will do nothing to win confidence over those who have a doubt. My son and his girlfriend are having their second Pfizer today – then he canโ€™t wait to be allowed into his work, feel free to go to concerts etc after 18 months working from a laptop in a flat! Wishing you a lovely week! ๐Ÿ˜€๐ŸŒบ

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    1. That little bit of confidence the vaccine gives you is worth it. I know it won’t give 100% protection but like your son and girlfriend feel, it will give the body some assistance to fight off the virus. 18 months working in a flat is a long time. You guys have really had it tough over there! Are cases dropping off now that vaccinations have reached a level? That is the belief and the mantra the Government tells us to believe.

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      1. Amanda, it is a very mixed story here in the UK. The good news is that hospitalisations and deaths are much lower than they were but creeping up. Over 100 deaths per day (and 150,000+ total). Cases are also going up, approx 35,000 a day. BUT you have to bear in mind the country opened fully in July which was scary. Many are happy to attend events with 50,000 people, others like us are still cautious. Without the jabs I would barely dare go out at all and thankfully the jabs have stopped massive hospital cases – so far. Without them the country would still be paralysed nd all other healthcare sidelined as it was for months on end. It is an incredible tough time and beggers belief how many think it’s all over. Wishing you all well! hugs xx

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        1. I can understand your reluctance to set foot outside the door. I think our national Government is getting the same idea about opening up once our vaccination levels are higher. They might be closely looking at UK to see what happens. In Sweden, they never locked down did they? Did they far any worse than the UK? (population differences withstanding).
          We are concerned about 100 cases a day let along 100 deaths per day. That is frightening. Is it mainly older people that are mortally affected?

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          1. Youโ€™re right to an extent about Sweden but they have had restrictions in places, limits on numbers allowed to meet, social distancing, schools closed for older students and university taught remotely. Larger gatherings are still not allowed nor is my husband allowed in! Relatively their case numbers are far lower than U.K. and likewise deaths … by being consistent throughout hasnโ€™t caused the surges of post-lockdown mania that seemed to have overcome some here. As you can tell this is a topic I read much about and been following Australia particularly as well. It seems like a long time since the old normal … hmmm …

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            1. The story makes for a good apocalyptic plotline except it is reality. As I commented to Sandy, the approach is now differing between states. Here in the north and the West we continue on, life as normal but wear masks. Down south they have had to lockdown for much longer, because initially they didn’t aggressively stop the spread. The public wasn’t co-operative and now they have had to enforce a hard lockdown but the cat is out of the bag and running. They cannot keep up. Up here in the north we prefer to go hard and fast, lockdown if there is more than 1 or 2 cases and quarantine everyone who is a close contact. This stops the spread in its tracks and after a week or two we are bad to normal again. I like that, but our borders have to remain closed to the southern states. Eventually there will be a leak of the virus here and we will no longer be able to contain it. Hopefully by then everyone will be vaccinated. And we have nothing to complain about really. When we see the staggering number of cases overseas. I hear Malaysia has 20,000 a day as well and it is a voluntary stay at home arrangement. Such action or inaction would be unthinkable here. Our lower population and population density I feel helps us and the small numbers of cases allow us to trace close contacts and manage it very early. We only have a small window to do it and if it isn’t done then, it is too late to have a positive effect on case numbers. I feel sorry for people in the southern states….

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  6. Good on you, Amanda. I think it is a good move. Get the jab or get the virus seems the only possible scenario if the national plan is anything to go by. I’m glad you didn’t keel over. My husband and I went to one of the Commonwealth clinics. We got info on the side affects but the post injection monitoring left something to be desired. My kids got AZ at my doctor’s surgery. Monitoring and info was good. My 8o year old father got a leftover shot at a big GP clinic when he went in for something else. No side affect info though. It seems quite variable.

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    1. Post effects are a bit variable. I don’t feel anything at present but who knows, maybe 2nd one will be worse with Pfizer. How come your kids got AZ? Surely they are not over 60?

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      1. Effects. My spelling is awful. My children are mid and early 20s. They decided to get AZ based on advice from ACT government at the time that jabs for people in their cohort would not be available until end Oct given projected supply of Pfizer. They wanted to do the right thing to protect themselves, us (they live at home), and their colleagues. The swaps were announced after they had their first jab. Those who waited will probably be fully vaccinated before them. No matter, the more others are covered, the safer we will all be. I’m very high risk but fully vaccinated. I’m currently doing the shopping for everyone. Yes, it makes the PM looks good, but it would be stupid to delay because one might not like the guy!

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        1. I don’t think many would not vaccinate because they don’t like the PM. There was hesitancy for many reasons. It didn’t seem a priority; A-Z had problems, appointment availability was a big issue. If you are high risk, I am glad you are covered. It has to help somewhat against the worst effects of this nasty thing. Having had influenza B some years back, I would never wish Corona on anyone. It took me about several years to recover from the pneumonia that resulted from that flu!

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          1. My mother got pneumonia after flu a few years ago too. I thought we were going to lose her so, yes indeed, get as much protection as you can now. I was exceedingly ill after RSV a few years ago. So much for it being a childhood illness. Same for the bout of whooping cough that wiped me out for about 8 months.

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            1. Whooping cough and RSV are nasty respiratory viruses and I am not surprised that they wiped you out for many months. Did you find anything helped your recovery besides the necessary medications?

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              1. Only time. I had the RSV before my Queensland trip to see my mum. My doctor advised me to take the coast road because it would be warmer. It took about 10 days to get there. We mostly camped. The warm weather helped. I think it took 8 months to get over the whooping cough. I think I had got better but then had a post viral cough I couldn’t shake. So I decided that the whole situation was ridiculous and went back to choir. Singing really helped.

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              2. It might be like the post-bronchialitis 100 day cough. All that seep inhalation and exhalation would have helped tremendously.
                For me, I couldn’t sing in my choir, as the lung difficulties asthma-related as a repercussion of chest infections.

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  7. We notice not many people are using the Covid App to sign in either. I think all the medical staff are getting a bit jaded. Is this your second jab Amanda? You sound like me as far as Gallstone Gladys goes. I cringe everytime she delivers her press conference, pussyfooting around. The way she didnโ€™t close it down in the first place, and now the whole country is at risk.

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    1. It was a foolish approach that Ms ButterChicken chose. (the nickname my kids call her). One only has a small window to stop the speedy spread of the virus and she blew it! I also feel sorry for the jaded police as well as the medicos dealing with the fallout.
      This was my first jab. I found an earlier appointment otherwise would be waiting till end of September for the first one.

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  8. Hope you second jab covers you for the future. Here in the UK they are talking about a third, a booster vaccination. I’ll have whatever they want to throw at me because the alternative is unthinkable!

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    1. Yes, Janis. It is shameful to think our well-resourced health service was deliberately stymed by a foolish government. I think some African countries are even well ahead of us in terms of vaccination. We are paying the price now!

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  9. So glad you managed to get your jab done, if under less than stellar conditions. Hope it didn’t dampen the Father’s Day festivities. And that the effects of the vaccine didn’t bother you too much after.

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  10. I’m happy to hear you have your vaccination started. It was quite easy here once I finally decided to get it done after my daughter worked on me for some time. Because of my medical condition, I was afraid of it. Now I see that was silly. I’m ready for everyone to get the vaccine and get it over with for good.

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  11. It was the same in WA, very bad management and if you moved forward without being told you were promptly told to get back in your chair. One nurse kept coming out of her cubicle with her iPad needing instructions on how to use it

    Liked by 1 person

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