For Richer and Poorer – Sunday Sayings

Polish Palace in Warsaw
Palace in Warsaw

Weekly Proverb

When I had money everyone called me brother

Polish proverb

metropolis people busy

“The gap between rich and poor is now at a level where Europe, at the time of the French revolution, looks positively socialistic by comparison:

~The three wealthiest people in the world today now own more than the poorest 48 nations combined!

~The top 1% owns more than half the total wealth of Earth.

We live in a world of scarcity, of needs and wants and unfulfilled dreams. And we, ourselves, are the ones who made it that way. https://northerndragon.blog/

wealthiest people in the world

  • Mark Zuckerberg. Net Worth: $61 Billion. …
  • Carlos Slim Helu. Net Worth: $61.7 Billion. …
  • Larry Ellison. Net Worth: $64.1 Billion. …
  • Amancio Ortega. Net Worth: $67 Billion. …
  • Warren Buffett. Net Worth: $82.7 Billion. …
  • Bernard Arnault. Net Worth: $83.7 Billion. …
  • Bill Gates. Net Worth: $98.3 Billion. …
  • Jeff Bezos. Net Worth: $145.3 Billion – CEO of Amazon

Do you feel that there is something fundamentally wrong here?

How is it possible to have this much wealth concentrated in just 8 names? It is beyond my comprehension what you might do with this much money. How does someone with this much wealth stays balanced? Do they see their money on only being ‘on paper?’

Would such enormous wealth corrupt you?

Wealth does not involve having many things, pointed out Jean-Jacques Rousseau, a Genevan philosopher in 1754, it involves having what we long for.

“Wealth is not absolute, it’s relative to desire. “

Jean-Jacques Rousseau

How much money do a person really desire, or need, over the course of any given year, in order to have what each might consider, a great life?

What would you do with such enormous wealth?

Weeklyquote

“Wealth is not about having a lot of money; it’s about having a lot of options.”

Chris Rock

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Sunday Sayings – Worry

helnaes

Does worry serve or support us?

Our mind perceives a potential threat and becomes stuck on seeking an answer or solution, a way forward to a safer or more secure state where everything is more predictable, controlled or orderly. This is worry. For some, worry leads to anxiety.

For every behaviour, there is a perceived mental pay-off. What’s the pay-off for the time we devote to this practise of worrying?

Do we feel better for worrying? Or worse? Does it rob us of valuable time and energy?

wEEKLY PROVERB

“Worry often gives a small thing a big shadow”

~Swedish Proverb

sunnfjord
Sunnfjord

WEEKLY QUOTE

“Don’t be intimidated by what you don’t know.

That can be your greatest strength and ensure that you do things differently from everyone else”

~ Sara Blakely (American businesswoman)

Great ocean Road

Worry takes our attention away from the present, from what is real and we are dwelling in possibilities – either in the past, or the possible future. The more possible outcomes, the more we worry, and the harder it is to let go.  It makes us feel helpless or trapped.

Sara Blakely’s words can apply to many different situations.

Let your uncertainty be your strength.

More on worrying here.

How do you see worry? Does it serve a purpose for you? What have you found effective in counteracting worry?

Everyone’s opinion is important. What is yours?

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment.

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned.

Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Sunday Sayings – Problem Solving

Snow pea insect
This is particularly pertinent to Climate Change Problems

We have to change our thinking in order to find the solution.

I hear lots of criticism of student protests for Global Change, mainly folks blaming them for highlighting a problem without suggesting answers, but if we think about Albert Einstein’s quote, is this not so surprising?

Snow pea insect

Swedish school student and advocate for Global change, Greta Thunberg suggests we must work collaboratively to find new answers to the world’s problems.

“Many don’t listen to the science of climate change because they are only interested in solutions that will enable them to carry on like before. Those solutions don’t exist anymore because [you] did not act in time. “

Greta Thunberg

Similarly, we have to invent new way to create our own happiness – if you listen to the Dalai Lama –

Happiness is not something ready made.

It comes from your own actions

~Dalai Lama

We alone are responsible for our happiness.

Others may influence us, but ultimately it is our choice how we react to any given situation or event.

Several years ago, I created ‘Proverbial Friday’ on my blog.
I became fascinated with traditional proverbs and sayings, their metaphorical layers and the many different interpretations found within just a few, succinct words. I marveled at their ability to transcend race, religion, opinions and age.
Mostly anonymous, proverbs are a portal through time to generations past and echo a diverse range of cultures.
They speak of the experiences of many lessons learned and the wisdom from thousands of lives already lived.
They offer us knowledge; knowledge that is passed to us in much the same way relay runners might pass a baton. Once it’s handed over, it is up to us what we do with it and how we pass it on.

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Something to Ponder About this Sunday

Marie Kondo – Because of you

traffic light control box art
Geraniums

Dear Marie,

My husband, (aka MOTH), is not happy.

Because of you, our house will never be the same.

Because of you, my house is tidier.

But the MOTH – The ‘Man About the House’ – is frustrated!

If you haven’t heard of Marie Kondo, it may be that you don’t have a TV set or haven’t stepped inside a bookshop, of late. Marie Kondo, a Japanese lady, advocates the Kon-Mari method of Organization. Through her TV show and book titled, “The Life-changing Magic of Tidying,” Marie has brought a new wave of organizational and tidying techniques to the world.

Marie’s particular brand of household magic involves a range of vertical storage solutions, lots of folding strategies, and sorting one’s possessions into certain categories. The central tenet behind her de-cluttering techniques is to hold each item in turn, to one’s heart, whilst asking yourself the question, “Does this item spark joy in me? ” If the answer is yes, the item is kept; if the answer is no – the item is gratefully thanked for its job in one’s life, and then promptly ditched.

Gympie shopping

I began to read Marie’s book and then this happened –

The process of sorting and folding begins

Like a thrift shop’s sorting table, this was a scene from my house shortly after I started to read Marie’s book.

Around about that time my husband started to “lose” things.

I was reading Marie’s book and he was uttering a variety of indignant lamentations.

“Where is that hard drive I left on the desk,” he demanded, as I perused Chapter 3. Midway through reading Chapter 5, he asked me, “..Those batteries I had beside the TV, what’s happened to them?” By the closing chapter of Marie’s book, the crescendo of laments had reached a point of desperation, “Just where ARE my shoes?” he cried.

(They’d been moved to their new ‘spot,’ of course, at the bottom of his wardrobe).

I have to say Marie: – Because of you, papers are now never left to pile up on desks; shoes are regularly moved from under beds and chairs, and miscellaneous items are no longer stored, “to hand”, as a visual reminder.

But the MOTH cannot find anything because it is packed away neatly in cupboards and drawers, in places he never looks! So, he is definitely not happy with Marie.

bird-talk-yell

Marie is also to blame for the careful rolling and folding of every piece of clothing I own. She’s responsible for the discarding of lots of my unused “stuff.” It is also, though, her fault for my having increased capacity in storage cupboards; a strong ability to locate those less frequently used items faster, and even to blame for me being capable of selecting coordinates in a blink of the eye.

marimekko shop helsinki

For Marie is right.

A lot of that “stuff,” we accumulate over time, sits at the back of storage cupboards, and will most likely never be worn, or used.

Then there’s that feeling of guilt I no longer have for buying extra clothes, or purchasing things I won’t always use. Prior to reading Marie’s book, I used to admonish my daughter for throwing out so many new-ish clothes and goods, in so short a time after their purchase, thinking her a wee bit wasteful.

Up-cycling a T shirt into a plaited belt

I am was a big up-cycling and recycling advocate, who could always find another use for any item. To throw out clothes that might be re-fashioned was akin to sacrilege.

But Marie believes that tidying and de-cluttering is a way of taking stock and finding out what we really do like. And Marie’s advice is spot on when she stated many of those so called ‘rescued and re-fashioned items would simply accumulate in storage, only to be thrown out years later, without ever being up-cycled.

Well, I did recycle a few items from my stash, but probably much less than half, I have to admit.

Where am I

Where does this feeling of wanting to buy and keep material goods come from?

After spending a lifetime tidying and honing tidying into a fully fledged international business, Marie has an explanation for this behaviour. Marie says:-

We amass material things for the same reason we eat – to satisfy a craving. She insists that through tidying and de-cluttering, people come to know contentment.

A new way forward for my things

Marie’s method is a way of respecting and organizing our possessions, caring for them and appreciating what we have and what we choose to keep. By employing the Kon-Mari method, Marie frees us from the burden of accumulating more and more ‘stuff,’ and in this way, tidying becomes a a life-changing experience.

And what happens to the MOTH’s shoes now that I have finished the book?

They are still placed neatly under the chair, each evening.

I guess Marie should address MOTHS in her next book.

Something to Ponder About


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Sunday Sayings – The Present Moment

Nothing in life is constant.  Like the force of the ocean, life fluctuates between a wearing away (negative or sad feelings) and a building up (positives).

The Arch great ocean road

As corny as it sounds, the way we think does determine our ‘world,’ our ‘present moment.’

If you are willing to appreciate that this moment is far better than it could have been, you will enjoy it more for what it truly is.”


(source: Marc and Angel)

When our mind is not focused on a task, we tend to live in a world of reflection. We can work through problems, remember experiences and plan for the future. There is nothing wrong with reflection, as long as it doesn’t become set to “critique”mode. That surely results in negativity and for some people: depression. 

It is rare to have absolute happiness or absolute sadness, so our moods oscillate somewhere between the two ends of the spectrum. At any given moment we are comparing how we currently feel to how we felt at another time – comparing one level of our contentment to another.

Negative comparisons can distract you from happiness around you if you notice it.

pensive thoughful looking upward

Since it is our mind that directs and controls the body, it’s the way you think that eventually makes you feel good or bad. The way we think also allows us to dismiss and give up but also to dream, hope and ponder. Increasing our awareness of the present moment can increase our enjoyment and lessen the melancholic reflections of our mind.

Life is not all black and white, but oscillates in between

What do you think? Do you agree?

Everyone’s opinion is important.

Something to ponder about this Sunday.