Hallingdal Golfjellet- sheep
blogging, Mental Health, Photography, Travel

Friendly Friday Challenge – Quiet Places

The world can be a stressful place at times. Often there is a need to step back and re-energize our tolerance to stress, pressures and worries.

Certain places in the world can be restorative to our spirit. These places may be somewhere in your own region, in your own street or even in one’s own backyard or a quiet city street.

Such ‘Quiet Places,‘ may bring solace and a settling of the nerves.

norway
Dalen, Norway

In the year of Covid confusion, I re-visit quiet places in my dreams. Photo archives bring those memories to life again, if only for a transient moment, in the present time.

Like the time, I stayed up in the mountains of Norway..

Or on the banks of the Tauber River in Germany.

light

I am drawn to locations by the water, presumably due to the calming effect of the waves gently caressing the shoreline.

What about you?

Where is your ‘Quiet Place?’

Create a Friendly Friday Challenge ‘Quiet Places’ Post

To join the challenge, simply add a ping-back link and a Friendly Friday tag to a new post, then come back here to leave a comment with the published link, so visitors can find you and visit.

If this is your first challenge contribution, there is a full set of instructions on how to join the Friendly Friday Photo Challenge on my blog header.

Friendly Friday will at StPA, in two weeks time. In the meantime, next Friday, you can discover the next prompt at my Friendly Friday Challenge Co-host’s blog, The Sandy Chronicles.

grass amongst mangroves at the beach
Australia, blogging, Photography

Friendly Friday Challenge- Splendour in the Grass

So often we walk around in nature failing to notice the details, the grass under our feet.

Subtle changes in colour and appearance indicate the passing of the seasons. Many varieties of grass remain invisible, yet are an integral part of the natural landscape.

Senga Grass at Mt Hakone

The theme for this week’s Friendly Friday challenge is:

‘Splendour in the Grass’

grass in close up Australia

Using Grass to Frame a Landscape in Photography

In photographic terms, grass can be used to frame the shot or make an interesting feature in the foreground.

This ‘Moon viewing,’ photo captured during the Tsukimi festival in mid-Autumn, in Japan.

Japanese Senga Grass Fields at Mount Fuji

The Japanese find Splendour in the Sengakuhara Pampas Grass, by strolling along a walking trail, at the western side of Mount Hakone. For it is here that the changing colour of the tall grass offers stunning vistas. In November, the grass turns a shimmering, silvery gold. Wedding proposal and selfies abound at this time of year.

Australian Splendour

In Australia, a country fringed by blue oceans, you will find grass the colour of sunburnt earth, which often makes me yearn for the vivid fluorescent green grass of wetter climates.

Birch
Birch Trees and Grass in Helsinki – so green

Australian deserts display different kinds of saltbush grass.

Australian Desert grasses and Saltbush

In the arid conditions of the Australian landscape, plants have adapted to grow under extreme conditions, such as the grass tree.

Grass Trees in Australia

Grass Trees in their natural habitat

A relic of the Age of Dinosaurs, Xanthorrhoeas, also known as the Grass Tree, grow very slowly and are resistant to bushfire. In fact, fire helps the grass tree produce its flowers. They also have a unique symbiotic relationship with the soil. The presence of a mycorrhizal microbe in the soil around their roots allows them to flourish, even if the soils are nutrient-poor.

Grass Trees in the Garden

Grass Trees are highly sought after in Australian horticulture and as such are often illegally removed from their natural locations. They fetch high prices as ornamental plants. Little do the owners realize that if the soil in their garden does not contain the mycorrhizal enzyme, the grass tree that they paid so dearly for, will wither and die.

Imitating Nature in Growing Grass Trees

Here’s a secret that an old-timer once told me. Take a cup of brown sugar, put it in a bucket of water and water your grass trees once a month for two years with that mixture. The sugar feeds the mycorrhiza and gets it going and your grass tree will survive.

www.abc.net.au/gardening

Create a Friendly Friday Challenge Blog Post

Everyone is welcome to join the Friendly Friday Challenge with your own interpretation of the theme.

Add a pingback to StPA and tag your post with ‘Friendly Friday – Splendour in the Grass.’ Then return to this post and leave a comment below listing your post’s published link.

There is a full set of instructions on how to join the Friendly Friday Photo Challenge on my blog header. This challenge runs until next Thursday.

Last week’s Friendly Friday Challenge initiated some excellent contributions, with the theme of ‘Markets,‘ over at co-host Sandy’s blog.

Would you like to join in this week?

Friendly Friday
blogging, Photography

Friendly Friday Challenge – Colour Harmonies

Do you have an eye for colour in your photography?

Using colour helps to create mood and feelings in photographs and may result in a photo that is more pleasing to the eye.

trondheim
baklandet buildings

Photographers can create a heightened level of visual interest and enhance photos by seeking out particular colour harmonies in the environment.

Such colour combinations may be

  • analogous
  • complementary
  • monochromatic

Capturing Reds, Yellows and Orange tones is an example of an Analogous colour scheme.

Seeking out or deliberately combining the following colours may complement and enhance each other.

  • Oranges and Blues
  • Reds with Greens
  • Yellows with Purple

Keep in mind the saturation and the value of colours will alter the way they go together.

gardens

A split complementary colour scheme might include shades of Red, Orange and Blueish-green. Josef Alber’s images are an example.

traditions

Using a certain background colour in our photographs can also influence how our subject appears. There is more of an explanation here relating to using colour to enhance food photography.

This week’s prompt for Friendly Friday is for you to find or create

Colour Harmonies

Trondheim river

Create a Friendly Friday Challenge Post

Simply add a pingback and tag ‘Friendly Friday – Colour Harmonies‘ to your own post, then return here, leave a comment below adding your published link, so we can find your post.

If this is your first challenge contribution, there is a full set of instructions on how to join the Friendly Friday Photo Challenge on my blog header.

Everyone is welcome to join in.

I will return in two weeks time with another Friendly Friday post.

Next week, you will be in the able hands of Sandy, my Friendly Friday co-host, who will post the new Friendly Friday prompt.

Photography

Friendly Friday Challenge – Close Examination

Explore the finer details of your photos through Close Examination.

Use Macro Mode, Zoom in, (a little), or crop afterwards to take macro and close-up photographs.

beard of a schnauzer dog
They are not called Schnauzers for nothing. ‘Schnauze’ means muzzle in German.

This photo was a little too close for comfort.

geiser Iceland
Waited for a while to capture this one

Photographic Tips – Improving your Macro Photography

  • Check the composition of your photo
  • Take multiple shots
  • Use Manual mode or focus if you can
  • Stabilize your camera as much as possible – (a tripod or solid base helps)
  • Move the subject, not the camera
  • Try adding the effect of different backgrounds
  • Check your depth of field for focusing

I got a bit fancy with the Canva templates, but the close-up, above, of the little mushrooms, were very worthwhile to highlight. So delicate sitting atop their thin stalks, they appeared to defy gravity.

And now for a slideshow of flowers:-

  • Snow pea insect
  • cape gooseberry in paper case
  • burst of colour

I added a frame around the pumpkin leaves. It may have been edited with Snapseed, but it is from my archives, so I can’t be sure. I do like the way you can see the furry hairs on the pumpkin leaves. Glaucous is the botanic name for hairy leaves, I think.

Pumpkin leaves in macro
It is all about the detail

“Taking pictures is savouring life intensely

every hundredth of a second.”

duggal.com

Friendly Friday Photo Challenge – Close Examination Prompt

Now it is your turn to write a Friendly Friday post with the theme, “Close Examination.”

Don’t forget to tag your post and link with a pingback here, so all readers can find your post.

Sandy, will have another great prompt for you next week.

Join the Friendly Friday Challenge.

Friendly Friday
eye
Photography

Friendly Friday Photo Challenge – Capturing a Feeling

How seriously do you take your Photography?

Is taking photos just a whim, a bit of fun? A hobby you would like to improve? Or a serious pursuit? Whichever category you fit into, (or don’t), we notice photos that are striking, ones that capture attention, (pun not intended).

This old portrait captures a strong emotion in the eyes

Scott Bourne has some thoughts on the magic behind photography and it was his post that made me re-consider how we take photographs.

Do we snap a shot just as a record of what you saw?

Do we compose for interest?

We might even find an angle that portrays a little more emotion, particularly for street or portrait photography.

If so, we convey a feeling through the photograph to the viewer.

Great ocean Road
Not the standard tourist stop portrait

Scott explains a little more of what he looks for in a photo:

Unfortunately, in today’s instant gratification-hungry world, it’s rare to find someone who will look past the superficial to find something special. Everyone just wants a magic camera, or lens, or camera setting or post-processing, preset. Unfortunately there is no magic anything. What there is well, that is all about SEEING. I want to encourage you to “feel” your way to a photograph.

Scott Bourne – picturemethods.com
daisy

Some people have an eye for photography. Others have to work to develop it. Regardless of your camera budget, if you do have an eye or can develop it, your photos will attract attention.

seeing
Such expression in this cropped photo of eyes.

Friendly Friday Theme – ‘Capturing a Feeling’

This week for Friendly Friday, when you take a photograph try to compose to capture a feeling or emotion.

If you are using your archival photographs, you might crop a photo or edit to exhibit a particular mood that you wish to create.

Today for example, we made a new friend.

A young magpie landed on our fence, literally right behind our heads, as we sipped our morning cup of tea. The bird was bold and curious and his reward for that, was a morsel of cake. We watched his confidence and trust, in us, slowly grow as I hand-fed him a small piece of ham.

I cropped the following photograph to create a feeling of intensity, of concentration and to convey the beginnings of trust in the bird’s eyes.

After tasting the morsel of carrot cake, he must have thought his luck had changed.

I like the contrast of nature and the stark white and ultra modern built environment behind, but feel that some editing would help the photo stand out. But today, I left it as is. What do you think?

This afternoon the bird returned with his mate, who was much more cautious about the ham and preferred a lawn grub or two which is far better for them, anyway.

Posting a Friendly Friday Challenge?

Don’t forget to comment here, tag and pingback to this post.

Instructions on how to join the Friendly Friday Photo Challenge

Friendly Friday

I will be back in two weeks time with another prompt. Next week, for Friendly Friday, you will be in the able hands of Sandy, my Friendly Friday co-host, who will post next week’s challenge.

craft, History & Traditions, Painting, Photography, Traditional Art

Kashubian Embroidery

Traditional Tuesday – [A look at traditional Art Forms]

Poland is a country of deeply rooted culture and pursuits, not the least of which, is iconic Polish Folk Art forms, such as a specialist kind of stitching, called Kashuby embroidery. Initially used as a decoration for clothing, particularly folk costumes and women’s caps, these distinctive motifs have been transformed and used to decorate items as diverse as pottery, furniture, tableware and a range of merchandise from lanyards to mouse pads.

Kashubians are a proud people with a separate language, craft and folklore to other Polish areas. Their motto is “There is no Kashubia without Poles and Poland without Kaszubians.”

Product available in Zazzle and Redbubble

Previously considered an activity for Grandmothers, girls of all ages and even men, in Kashubia, enjoy decorating clothing with Kashuby Embroidery.

Colours

Kashubia, [a province in coastal Pomerania], is famous for its distinctive embroidery that consistently features seven main colours.

http://www.wilno.org/culture/embroidery.html

The palette used in Kashuby embroidery utilises seven main thread colours and believe or not, this tends to be strictly observed, i.e. 3 shades of blue, yellow, red, green and brown/black, for it to be called Kashuby Style.

Each of the colors used symbolized something from nature and the people.

BLUE: –

  • Dark Blue – represents the profound depth of the Baltic Sea
  • Medium or Royal Blue – the colour of the Kashubian Lakes
  • Light Blue – for the sky of Kashubia

YELLOW :-

  • Light Yellow – representing the sand on the beaches and the sun.
  • Medium Yellow for the grains ripening in the fields
  • Dark Yellow symbolizing amber, commonly found washed up on the beaches, in these coastal areas.

GREEN :-

  • Symbolizes the meadows and plant life
  • Indicates the forests teeming with animal life

RED :-

  • The use of the colour red indicated the heart and love
  • also indicative of the blood of every Kashubian. They are a fiercely patriotic people, and would die to defend their homeland.
  • Red also represents poppies in girl’s hairs

BLACK or BROWN :-

  • representing sorrow and adversity
  • symbolizing the earth in the fields awaiting to be sown seeds.

Motifs

hafty

Because of the poverty of the surrounding soil, the Kashubian landscape produces flowers that are stringy, but still colourful. Nature is an important inspiration for floral motifs, especially bell-flowers, lilies, daisies, roses, cornflowers, pomegranates and clovers. Tulips and Acanthus motifs, derived from Christian religious traditions were incorporated as oak or thistle leaves and restricted to embroidery executed by Nuns in the convents.

Adding Beetles and bee motifs to the embroidery stemmed from connections to the ancient pagan traditions of honouring nature.

A lovely element used in Kashuby embroidery is the ‘tree of life.’ Ideally, the branches mustn’t cross or intertwine because it symbolises that life ought to be simple and clear.

In the nineteenth century, fashions changed and traditional folk art patterned outfits began to slowly disappear but some crafts hung on and were printed on to modern merchandise to appeal to tourists.

Formerly, the different style of embroidered costume was related to the particular job the person was doing. Farmers had different motifs and outfits to that seen on fisherman.

In modern times, these outfits are rarely seen outside of special occasions, events or musical performances yet the popularity of the embroidery style, lives on.

More posts on Polish Folk Art

folk art eggs
blogging, Photography

Friendly Friday Challenge – Nostalgia

norway
A day in Norway

“Photographers are writers- Writers are photographers: we catch a glimpse of something beautiful – a flower, a glance, a window – and catch it into our camera or writing lens: add a bit of glimmer, a ghost of a shadow, allowing the background to sink into fuzziness while focusing on the sharp beauty; thus, we highlight the romance of life.”

Pamela Wight from https://roughwighting.net/

What beautiful words from Pam – inspirational words that inspire us to become better photographers, whether we are amateur or professional. We strive to become photographers that capture the emotion in a scene, or evoke a feeling from the viewer.

It is my photographs that tell me that four years ago I was leaving Poland on a flight to Denmark. I was overjoyed to be in Denmark, but so sad to leave Poland behind.

Five years ago, I took photos of our newest family member.

While six years ago, I was driving overland across the mountains and fjords of Norway.

Ten years ago, the following photo reminds me of the serenity I felt the day I was punting on the Avon River in Christchurch, New Zealand. It was just two weeks before the first of two devastating earthquakes to hit that city.

christchurch
The Avon River, Christchurch

More than 40 years ago, I was about to fall in love. Not with a boy, but with the snow. I was leaving for my first skiing holiday with friends.

Girl in coat and beret

Without photographs, these memories and feelings might be lost in the passage of time.

Memories are made of moments.

Life is a collection of such moments fused into an ever-changing continuum.

The transient nature of life’s experiences are one reason why we take photographs. Like time travelling, photographs are a way to give life to the past, so we can imagine again that moment in time, in all its visual richness.

Looking at photos might evoke a feeling of NOSTALGIA.

Feeling Nostalgic

Join the Weekly Friendly Friday Challenge Theme

To join in with this week’s challenge theme, simply create a post, including a pingback, using the theme Nostalgia, and tag it:

Friendly Friday – Nostalgia

Be sure to leave a comment below,as well as the pingback, so others can read your post.

Write a Little More for Friendly Friday

As this is the first Friendly Friday post for the month, we would love you to write a little bit more about your chosen photo/s. It’s far more interesting to hear the narrative in addition to the photos that you post. [This does not have to be a lengthy]. Here are some ideas if you are stuck on what to write:

  • What is its significance or history of the photo/s?
  • Where and when were they taken?
  • Why was it taken?
  • Post a recipe/ re-tell an old story that relates to the topic

Monthly Guest Blogger – A Mindful Traveller

Each month, Sandy and I publish a Friendly Friday post from a guest blogger. This month the wonderful Lorelle from Melbourne, Australia, who blogs at A Mindful Traveller will be our guest blogger and will take about an old family recipe that evokes Nostalgia for her. The post will be published here at StPA tomorrow.

If you are interested in submitting a guest post for Friendly Friday, please contact me or Sandy, via the Contact pages or our WordPress Profiles.

Weekly Photo Challenge Next Week

Next week, Sandy will have a new topic for Friendly Friday. Follow our blogs to receive new themes each week.

Friendly Friday
blogging, Photography

Friendly Friday Challenge – Unusual

Many years ago, whilst travelling through country Australia, I snapped a photo of a patch of forest in an old park, where we’d stopped to have lunch. This was the days when you had to drop off your camera film and wait for several days, for it to be developed.

Remember that?

Weeks later, a friend saw the photo in my album and insisted the photo depicted a fairy pointing her finger towards something in the bushes. It was a mystery and a tad spine-tingling to remember there was a plaque, on a monument in that same park where I’d taken the photo, which said, “ in memory of the first white child who died in the valley.”

Photographers often claim to have captured photos with unexplained objects in them. Some turn out to be a simple case of double exposure, minute dust particles or even reflections, called Orbs, whilst others cannot be fully explained at all.

Do you believe in UFO’s or the Unusual?

Source: i.guim.co.uk/img/media/

More recently, as you can see in the photo below, I was in the picturesque town of Sandane, in Norway. I’d arrived in the early afternoon and was snapping photos of the fjord. Actually, it is pretty difficult for me not to take photos when I am presented with such natural beauty.

sandane norway
Sandane, Norway

Walking further along the fjord, a shower of rain interrupted my progress, so I snapped a few photos and quickly turned back for the Gloppen hotel, where I was staying that night. Something strange appeared in the photos, that I noticed only when back in the hotel.

There was a pacman in the sky.

Or was it some kind of chopped Photo Orb?

What is an Orb?

Orbs are a somewhat new phenomenon that appeared at the dawn of the digital camera in the 1990s. At first, the camera manufacturers believed these orbs to be malfunctions of the camera, but to this day they claim that these balls of light are microscopic particles floating in the air. On the other hand, those in the paranormal community hold firm that these orbs are the presence of spirits.

https://www.artmartstl.com/ghostly-orbs-fact-or-fiction/
haunted house
A Haunted house in Iceland with Orbs

How to Tell if an Orb is Dust or Something Unusual

From the abovementioned website, here is some information:

  • *If the orb or orbs in the photo seem to be behind a person or thing, as if peeking out or passing by, it could be supernatural. That’s because reflections don’t fall behind an object or person in a photo.
  • *If the orb has more density in the photo, it might not be a natural particle like dust.
  • *On film, if the orb or orbs seem to have a light of their own and move independently of wind or motion, it could be a spiritual encounter.
strange photo orb
Presumably a dust particle?

There are ‘Unusual’ things all around us.

Have you ever seen anything unusual?

Take a Seat!

Weekly Friendly Friday Prompt

For this week’s Friendly Friday Challenge, show us something you have photographed that was –

Unusual

or create your own:

Source – Stock Photo

Instructions for Joining Friendly Friday

Sandy will post the next weekly prompt next Friday!

Do include a pingback and leave a comment so all readers can find your post! I look forward to seeing what you come up with.

Merino Sheep, Mt Cook
blogging, Photography, Travel

Cromwell and The Lindis Pass

Lindiis pass
Iceland or New Zealand?

New Zealand has often been compared to Norway. In fact, on the way to Kastrup airport in Denmark, I saw one of those massive billboards, illuminated with a photograph of a snow-covered mountain.

The caption read,

“Norway?

No! New Zealand!”

Several years ago, I took a bus from Christchurch in the South Island of New Zealand all the way to Queenstown, via Mt Cook. I am hoping that I will be able to do this trip again.

If you are tempted to travel this section of New Zealand, I recommend taking a power block, or back up batteries for your phone or camera, because, if you are anything like me, you will find many jaw-dropping photo opportunities, as you pass through the Southern Alps.

One of the sights we passed by, that got the attention of fellow bus passengers, was a location that was one the film sets of Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings Movie trilogy.

Cromwell.....the Lindis pass
The Lord of the Rings movie trilogy was filmed in this location

Apparently, the local farmers were called in to provide extras for the Horse Stampede scene. This involved a large number of horsemen, a battle charge and horse stampede. The crews were set up and ready to film and had organized a large group of local farmers to be on standby as horsemen actors, but Peter Jackson felt that the weather and light was not optimal for filming so he cancelled the day.

This went on each day, for seven days. The farmers dutifully turned up each day, at the appointed time, ready for their big-screen break. After Peter Jackson cancelled filming again on the seventh consecutive day, the Farmers walked off the set.

They complained they couldn’t afford to be away from their farms, for so many days on end, twiddling their thumbs, so it was decided that their wives would step in and provide the horsemen extras for the stampede scene.

Next time you watch one of the movies and you think you are witnessing a cavalry charge of men, think again!!!

The Lindis Pass

The 60 kilometre stretch of road, known as the Lindis Pass, is considered by some to be the most beautiful passes in all of New Zealand. With the tussock grass covering all but the high snowy peaks, it is a great place to stop and view the majesty of the Southern Alps.

Be sure to check road conditions for the pass in the town of Omarama before you embark on this journey, as the pass crosses 971 metres above sea level, at its highest point. As such, its often closed due to bad weather conditions. It can even have black ice, making driving treacherous.

Approaching Lindis pass in our bus, I spotted a road farther up encircling the peak of the mountain; one that would give Norway’s “Trollstigen” a bit of competition.

On the way to Cromwell.....the Lindis pass

Traffic through the pass will often queue up when weather conditions force road closure for a few hours, or days. Oftentimes, travellers waiting along the road, will leave their cars and walk around collecting piles of rocks which they turn into cairns.

Norwegians would call these trolls.

Norge
Trolls at Trollstigen

Yet another parallel between New Zealand and Norway.

In many ways, travelling through this area I that if I squinted, I could easily fool myself that I was somewhere in Scandinavia or Iceland again.

Merino Sheep, Mt Cook

And that brings us to Lake Dunstan. It glorious aqua colour indicative of the glaciers that feed it.

Ski Fields and Lake Dunstan

Andrew our bus driver, explained how Lake Dunstan was created when a river was dammed, so the old township of Cromwell had to be relocated and the locals rehoused.

If you’re a ski bunny, the ski fields of Queenstown are a manageable driving distance away from this spot, (50 minutes to The Remarkables and 40 minutes to Wanaka). This is a great alternative to staying in Queenstown itself, which can be a tad more expensive.

Mt Cook

Activities in Otago and Queenstown

Besides Skiing, activities for individuals and groups who prefer to explore and experience places at their leisure, include:

  • Four-wheel driving the many hill tracks, or guided 4WD tours
  • Trekking and mountain biking
  • Visiting the Central Otago vineyards
  • Exploring the heritage stone buildings
  • Museum and Old Cromwell Town
  • Old mining landscapes
  • Guided fishing trips on Lake Dunstan
  • Golf
  • Snowmobiles (winter only)
  • Jet boating the Kawarau or Clutha Rivers

Continuing our bus journey meant only a short Tea stop at the roadside Fruit stall. I took the opportunity to purchase a couple of serves of breakfast fruit at farm gate prices.

do not touch

The stall also displayed some of the largest pine cones I have seen.

Ever the compliant tourist, I didn’t touch them.

blogging, History & Traditions, Photography

Friendly Friday: The Colour Pink – Guest Post

Vero writes:

When Amanda asked me to write a post with the prompt, “Pink,” my mind went in many directions first.

Then I paused: what’s really my relationship with this girly colour?

Let’s be honest, no matter how modern you are on the gender stereotyping theme, it will still take yonks before pink is something else than a female shade!

I grew up in the 70s, though, which was supposed to be a decade of change and evolution in the matter. But my mother was rather traditional. My bedroom had a pink wall paper – until very very late.

I wore pink dresses.

But looking at this other photo from my dance class, (ironically, it’s black and white!!); it seems I was suddenly totally opposed to pink and decided to make it very clear!

Being a teenager is very tricky, isn’t it.

You want to fit in but also you want to show the world how different you are from the crowd!

That’s when I started wearing very different items of clothing.

I particularly loved a velvet jacket and suede tie which belonged to my grandfather – 4 sizes too big for me. The results of my combo choices were often extremely peculiar but I guess that’s how I decided to be creative at that time.

And took ballet classes wearing pale pink leotards and tights. In a way, pink was the colour of my childhood.Then the teenage years followed. And they were black. Didn’t we all wear black then? It was the way to merge.


Pink never really came back in my wardrobe in my adult years. Except for fuchsia. Vibrant colours are what define me now. In French, we have a way to qualify vivid shades: we call them “shouting” or “yelling tints.”

As if it was so bright, it could actually make an unpleasant sound.

In my never-ending craving for strong saturation, I even painted my house’s front wall, one Saturday afternoon, in bright pink. My courtyard had already been indoctrinated with a mixture of bleu majorelle (link to jardinmajorelle.com/ang/ ) and anis green !


Click on over to Vero’s blog to read the second instalment of this post.

About the Guest Blogger

Vero was born in a green and quiet Parisian suburb. She left this idyllic scenery in her early twenties to live in England, later settling in the South of France and started a family of three (+dogs!). Now in her forties, she lives in a rural coastal village in Brittany.

Thanks to Vero for this interesting glimpse into her relationship with the colour pink prepared for this week’s Friendly Friday theme.

If you would like to be featured as a guest blogger for a Friendly Friday Challenge post, please contact Amanda or Sandy – hosts of Friendly Friday, via our contact pages.

Friendly Friday
Norwegian hakking
Photography

Friendly Friday Weekly Challenge – The Colour Pink

Young girls are pretty much divided into two camps – generally speaking. You are either a PINK or a PURPLE girl.

As each person’s eye sees colour, and variations of hue, a little differently and individually to the next, what is one person’s dreamy hue might be something another person intensely dislikes.

Tassie Tulips

Pink or Purple?

When we are young and asked what about our favourite colour, most girls will answer pink or purple. Very rarely, yellow or any other colour. This usually translates to little girls wearing predominantly either pink-coloured or purple-coloured clothes and decorations.

And never the Twain shall meet.

Just as most young boys will preference red as their favourite colour. At least in Australia, this is the pattern that we regularly see and hear, with young children.

Of course, this doesn’t mean that a Pink girl won’t wear, or use, other colours at all. It only means that when you ask a young girl what her favourite colour is, she will generally answer “Pink,” or she will answer, “Purple.”

It’s a thing.

Definitely a pink theme here but with a touch of purple

The Princess top in the above photo was purchased in Legoland in Denmark and was highly sought after in the Pre-school crowd at my daughter’s Kindergarten, especially so as it was unobtainable, in Australia. Fights even broke out, between the girls, over who got to wear it and there was lots of pouting from the ones that missed out. I had to ban the top from being worn to Kindergarten. My guess is the pink girls were the ones fighting.

One day a play date with a four-year-old friend of my daughter ended in tears. The little girl refused to leave our house unless she was allowed to take the Princess top home with her! My daughter naturally refused such an offer.

As for me: I used to be a purple girl, never a pink girl, but life changes you.

I had a wishy-washy lilac painted room as a child, as pastels were really the fashion. Yet, I have way too much Scandi genetic material to be completely sold on pastels, so a more cleaner, intensive colour is my choice these days. Yet looking through my WordPress archives, I note that most of my photos are indeed shades of purple, usually in the form of flowers.

I did find this gaudy ‘Pet Expo’ photo hidden in my archives:

This one didn’t have much choice in the matter!

We also see lots of pink in nature.

Or is it purple?

Pink or purple?

Join the Weekly Friendly Friday Challenge Theme

To join in, simply create a post, including a pingback, using the theme The Colour Pink, and tag it:

“Friendly Friday – The Colour Pink.”

Be sure to leave a comment below, so everyone can find your published post.

As this is the first post of the month, we ask you to post a little bit more about your chosen photo. This is not compulsory, but it is much more interesting to hear the narrative behind the photo. This does not have to be a lengthy piece.

Here are some ideas if you are stuck on what to write:

  • What is its significance or history of the photo/s?
  • Where and when were they taken?
  • Why was it taken?
  • Post a recipe/ tell a story that relates to the topic

Monthly Guest Blogger – Vero

We will soon be publishing a Guest post celebrating this theme, from the wonderful blogger Vero, in two parts. The first part will be published here at StPA tomorrow and the second part at Vero’s blog, so do check that out.

If you are interested in submitting a guest post for Friendly Friday, please contact me or Sandy, via the Contact pages, or via our WordPress Profiles.

Weekly Photo Challenge

Next week’s Friendly Friday Photo Challenge will be found at Sandy’s blog. See you there.

Friendly Friday
blogging, Community, Photography

Friendly Friday Photography Challenge

Can you find something in your photographic archives to share in a post?

Every second Friday, I host the Friendly Friday Photo Challenge with a different theme to challenge you.

history

Do you spot something around you that fits the weekly theme?

Our imagination is your only limitation.

Weekly Friendly Friday Theme

The Friendly Friday Community is inclusive of diversity. We have participants from many regions and our sense of community grows with each weekly challenge.

Community naturally evolves when a group of people come together to achieve something. And thus, the theme for this week’s photography challenge is:

Working Together

You scratch my back and I’ll return the favour.

With many of us in Lockdown, the theme, “Working Together,” might be more difficult. So ‘Community’ is an alternate theme, you can use or think about.

Do remember this is an opportunity to search your archives for a photograph, and there are no limits as to how you decide to interpret this theme.

The whole world is trying to Work Together to defeat the pandemic, albeit in their own different, or more effective/less effective ways. The ultimate goal is still consistent.

folk dance

This Friendly Friday theme is really not that hard – nor is Danish Folk Dancing.

When we can’t be together in a physical sense, there is always the virtual community, here at WordPress, collaborating, commenting, inspiring, posting.

I look forward to seeing what you interpret as your Community Working Together.

How to join the Friendly Friday Photo Challenge

  • Create a Post
  • Tag and Linkback your ‘Working Together’ Post.
  • Add a comment here, so that we all know you have posted as pingback are unreliable.
  • Visit other entrants and join in with our Friendly Friday community.
Friendly Friday


Do you need to know more about Friendly Friday? Find it here

Next week, my excellent co-host Sandy will have another great prompt for you, so follow her blog to find it: The Sandy Chronicles.

blogging, Photography

Friendly Friday Photo Challenge

F F Photo Challenge Prompt

This week’s prompt for the Friendly Friday Photo Challenge is:

Nightime

Rely on your archives, take a snap from your window, however you wish to join in with the challenge, is just fine with me.

Mostly my night photography harkens from Japan, a country that is well lit at night, but there are a few from my home town in my archives.

photography

This Blogging prompt will run until next Thursday. You may continue to post after that, however, I can’t promise to get to your post in a timely manner, but I’ll do my best.

Interested in joining in on the Friendly Friday Photo Challenge?

  • Create a Post
  • Tag and Linkback your ‘Nightime’ Post.
  • Add a comment here, so that we all know you have posted as pingback are unreliable.

Do you need to know more on Friendly Friday? Find it here

Next week, my imaginative co-host Sandy will have another great prompt for you, so check out her blog: The Sandy Chronicles.

Friendly Friday