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Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

River boats art

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

 

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.

 

I hope you will too.

 

 

 

Continuing with the present theme of Swedish proverbs, I found this thought provoking proverb. Why would a good man cope better?  Would not a devious, conniving man, or woman, succeed too?  But, of course, there is a price to pay for ill – gotten gains, isn’t there?  Is this what the proverb refers to, do you think?

 

“Bra karl reder sig själv ” – 

(A) good man will cope on his own ~ Swedish Proverb

 

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Coping and being self-reliant is a goal many of us have, but failing to cope or, at least, being unhappy might also provide us with opportunities to learn, according to Bill Gates.

 

“Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning.”Bill Gates

 

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CC0 Creative Commons

 

Do you agree with the Microsoft wiz?

 

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment below.

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Proverbial Friday – Surely something to ponder about.

Community

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

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I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.

I hope you will too.

Both the proverb and quote this week come from America. The proverb is an interesting old Native American saying –

 

“Force, no matter how concealed, begets resistance.”

~ Native American Proverb

 

Again from America, Mark Twain has some humbling words for us.

 

 

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What do you make of the proverb? Concealed force naturally gets people off side because it borders on trust issues. We trust that our friends are not going to hurt us, or force us against our will, because we do believe they care about us. If we felt they didn’t care, the friendship would wither and die.

We feel insulted if someone forces us to do something we don’t want to do. Sometimes we may dig our heels in and refuse, even if it is the sensible thing to do. We seem to like deciding for ourselves, which points to the intense need for self-respect.

Furthermore, it threatens our independence, choice making and self-control. All these things most people take for granted, and for someone to manipulate and force a course of action invalidates the person’s ability and right to choose for themselves.

Politicians might have sometimes forgotten the message the American Indian proverb is trying to convey.

I invite you to join in the discussion by sharing a comment below. Is force ever justified?

Does it always lead to resistance or compliance?

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Proverbial Friday – Something to Ponder About

 

Community

Pelican Poetry

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Pelican’s Morning

Flapping and fluttering of feathery wings.
Winging their way, on fluffy fantastic down,
Down on the lake they begin to preen,
Preen in the reflected face of the shimmering water
Water is their life, their food, their all,
All of them, families young and old preening and feeding together,
Together they fish, float, flap, flurry and flounder on the rocks they call home.

 

 

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Something to Ponder About

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Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdoms

I find there’s profound wisdom in the proverbs, sayings and quotes of days past, and I marvel at the way just a few choice words are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, these sayings are passed down, to us, from generations past and from different cultures. They speak of experiences of lives lived, and valuable lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you find them thought-provoking too.

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The quote this week comes from “The Risk-taker’s Book of Quotes” and the Venerable Dalai Lama:

Good quotes can also help abate the feeling of being alone. The knowledge that someone else, in some past time felt the same way I am feeling in this moment brings a sense of connectedness, and normalcy.

 -Jonathan Wunrow

  Freedom is a need. I have a cat. People feed this cat; they pet this cat; they give the cat everything he needs. But every time the window is open just a little, he runs away.

– Dalai Lama

The following Proverb is the first, in a series of Native American Proverbs, I will share each Proverbial Thursday. I think it’s very much a leveling proverb, reminding us of the inherent equality in all of mankind.  The Native American culture, might have been considered, by some, to be less developed, and yet they were well advanced in their understanding of the essential right and importance of equality to society.

“All who have died are equal.”

Native American Proverb

Does it refer to equality or even perhaps, inequality?
What do you think of the quotes?  Can you see a connection between the two?

Leave a comment and join the discussion.

It’s something to ponder about.

Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdoms

I find there is profound wisdom in the proverbs, sayings and quotes of days past, and I marvel at the way these few words are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you find them thought-provoking too.

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Proverb:

 

Patience attracts happiness;

it brings near that which is far –

(Swahili proverb)

Source: Sufiso’s blog

 

Proverbs like this are often wise words from our ancestors, passed down from generation to generation. Best savoured a little a time. At times they sound trite, yet wisdom is surely found within their concise words.

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Quote:

Life is being on the wire. Everything else is just waiting –

(Karl Wallenda)

 

I was a bit mystified by this quote, until I learned that Wallenda was a high wire performance artist!

What is Karl really waiting for?

Is your life on living on a wire?  Unpredictable, insecure?

Do you have a similar quote that inspires you?

I would love to hear your thoughts and so invite you to join in the discussion.

Proverbial sml

Proverbial Thursday gives us all Something to Ponder About

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Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdoms

I find there is profound wisdom in the proverbs, sayings and quotes of days past, and I marvel at the way these few words are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too.

This week, I continue my proverbs shared from Sifiso’s Blog.

Proverbs are used widely in African culture. Wisdom passed on from generation to generation in these short thought provoking phrases.

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Money can’t talk, yet it can make lies look true

South African Proverb

and the quotes for this week come from an American Author:

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“Opportunities dance with those on the dance floor.”

“Love is when the other person’s happiness is more important than your own.”

– H Jackson Brown Jr.

Who do you think of, when you read the South African Proverb?

Is the first quote about exploitation or participation?

Can you find a better description of love, than H Jackson Brown Jr.?

I would be pleased to hear your comments.

I invite you to join in the discussion.

Proverbial sml

Proverbial Thursday – Always Something to Ponder About

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Book review, Community

Strange Shores – Arnaldur Indridason Book Review

 

Iceland

Arnaldur Indridason is one of my favourite crime authors, and when I read novels that form part of a series, I  become quite attached to the characters,  as I did, with Detective Erlendur, in Strange Shores. This is the final book in the Detective Erlendur series, although there is the possibility of Erlender prequels being mooted, across the net, at the moment.

Erlendur,  himself, is a bit of a loner; a somewhat sad character who nevertheless has a keen intellect for solving crime. He hails from a family that has encountered hardship, loss and mental instability, which has been the undercurrent permeating story lines in the series, including Jar City, Hypothermia and Silence of the Grave.

Erlendur has, since he was young, been deeply affected by the disappearance of his only brother, who was lost in a Snowstorm, never to be found. It seems guilt is a driving factor in his inability to emotionally move on from this traumatic event.

Strange Shores wraps up this background story in a surprising way as Erlendur, ostensibly on leave in the East Fjords, becomes interested in the circumstances surrounding the disappearance of a young wife back in WWII, in circumstances similar to that of his young brother, Beggi. The subsequent rumours were, that after Matthildur’s disappearance, she returned to haunt her husband, who then later drowned in a storm. During his leave in the area, of his childhood, Erlendur chats to locals, and discovers that there just might be more to the ghost story than meets the eye.

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Iceland – where nature can so quickly turn ugly

This novel is not what one would call, fast-paced, but it does illuminate life in Iceland in the post war period and the public and private difficulties associated with living in a harsh environment, of that era. I found the splashes of history interesting and especially useful in anchoring the story to make it more believable.

Then there is the way the old Icelandic culture contrasts with the modern innovations of industry in contemporary Iceland and this pivots well with the connections between the old and new story lines.  Indridason’s character portraits are well-developed and the ‘old timers’ literally jump out from the pages with their craggy beards and pointed fingers.

One of the few remaining Icelandic sheep farms

In attempting to investigate and perhaps solve the mysterious disappearance of Matthildur, Erlendur comes face to face with his own demons and, in the process, the reader learns a lot about what drives the detective, as a person. This adds an element of psychological depth to the story that I found highly readable, however, this may not be so much the case for first – time readers, of an Indridason novel, as they would not have formed such a strong bond with Erlendur, as a character, as yet.

There are tragic themes in this novel as well, and it does delve into some of these. Society’s loners, recluses, and those suffering with mental illness feature in this novel, with the added issue of  how that may affect the family as a whole. The resilience of the Icelandic folk is self – evident throughout.

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Hekla – Volcano Iceland

Traveling through Iceland in the winter of 2008, I remember encountering the occasional abandoned farmstead, some, such as the one below, that Icelandic folk vehemently claimed, is haunted by ghosts. In the barren and unrelenting winter landscape that is Iceland, where nature reigns supreme and man is simply an afterthought, I don’t for one second doubt that the locals find imaginative ways to explain adverse happening such as the ghost in this story. So, it was with this memory and images in my head that I read Strange Shores, a story so Icelandic, with subterranean spiritual and psychological undertones. A fitting end to the Erlendur series.

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The Good: Visual imagery of the characters and landscapes and how life in Iceland is really living at the very edge of possible human habitation

The Bad: Jacob’s treatment of Ezra and the strange dreams Erlendur experiences

The Ugly: Erlendur’s actions in the graveyard

Rating: 7.5 out of 10

Something to Ponder About