Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

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“When it rains soup, the poor man has no spoon.”

– Swedish Proverb

 

 

 

Dalahest - Traditional horses

 

 

 

Storytelling is the most powerful way to put ideas into the world today.”

– Robert McKee

 

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Robert McKee, A Fulbright Scholar, is the most sought after screenwriting lecturer around the globe. He has dedicated the last 30 years to educating and mentoring screenwriters, novelists, playwrights, poets, documentary makers, producers, and directors internationally. However, McKee has been criticized for teaching screenwriting without ever having a script of his made into a film.

 

Thinking about the Swedish proverb, does it seem a little shallow or simplistic, to you? Poor communities can after all, have a very rich life, albeit not in materialistic or monetary terms. Is the proverb referring only to financial matters ?

And what do you make of Robert McKee’s words? Media can be used as a propaganda tool but is the media capable of suggestions of thought? Storytelling can teach us lessons in allegorical form, but can it also lead to misconceptions  by the reader or viewer? Take, for example, teenage girls who think they should look and act a certain way, based on watching mainstream TV? Do you think that media is purely entertainment value for the discerning viewer and that entertainment value can be separated from unrealistic impressions that relationships should be always be blissful, and an institutions such as marriage is always just a walk in the park. If this is true, could storytelling still be conducive or counterproductive to happiness?

I would be pleased to hear your thoughts.

 

 

Proverbial Friday – Something to ponder deeply about

~ Amanda

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Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

Proverbs and sayings provide us wise words from all corners of the world whose subtext is a moral lesson or statement. 

Best savoured a little at a time, these sayings are often handed down from generation to generation.

Each Friday, I post a saying, or proverb and a quote that I find thought-provoking. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

 

An American Indian Proverb this week that seems self-explanatory: –

 

 

 

Every accomplishment begins with the decision to TRY. Therefore, must we also, at this point, decide to be brave?

Or does the desire to be thought of as brave come later?

 

 

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There is little need for me to introduce the author of the quote, for this week. Perhaps you did not know that Ernest Hemingway talked about the FBI spying on him later in life. He was treated with electroshock.

It was later revealed that Hemingway was in fact watched, and Edgar Hoover had him placed under surveillance. Perhaps, in light of this, the following Hemingway quote is particularly apt.

 

 

Ron Mueck
Ron Mueck Figures

When people talk, listen completely. Most people never listen.”

– Ernest Hemingway

 

What do you make of the quotes?

Do you find many people don’t listen fully to what is said?

What factors influence whether they listen or not?

 

Some Wisdom to Ponder About this Friday*Blog

Now posting on Fridays*

Proverbial Friday and Global Wisdom

Proverbs and sayings often provide us with wise words from all corners of the world. 

Best savoured a little at a time, I find there to be profound wisdom in the words and marvel at how they succinctly communicate messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures.

They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned.

Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

raindrops 20150618_071310 

The WordPress community really is amazingly giving, as two bloggers have indirectly contributed to this week’s ‘Proverbial Friday’ post.

The proverb this week, comes from a book generously given to me, by LeggyPeggy.

Whilst short in length, this proverb originated in religious texts (NB. I am not at all religious), and yet it made me ponder the intrinsic nature of strength, versus wisdom.

“Wisdom is better than strength.” [Ecclesiastes]

 

Mt Pilatus

 

Strength is often considered an asset in life. There are those who say, that the weak or submissive are left behind.  We are encouraged to take the initiative, be on the front foot, be pro-active and assertive. We are warned that we might be left behind, cast aside in the wake of others in financial or intellectual achievement, in progress, or in personal growth. But this proverb made me stop and consider this a little deeper.

Should strength be the first and foremost goal? Should strength be valued at all? For strength without wisdom, can even be dangerous. History tells us that some leaders had strength but little wisdom.

What do you make of the proverb’s words?

The quote this week comes from a dear blogger friend, Ineke from Iscrap2, who recently published her memoir with these inspiring words, for parents, on the inside front page:

bear and happy girl

“The best thing you can give your children,

next to good habits,

are good memories”

– Sydney Harris

Birthday

Do you agree with Sydney Harris? Or is there some other value, more important than habits and memories that parents should share with their children?

Join in the conversation and let me know your thoughts.

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Now posting on Fridays

Some words to Ponder About

–  Amanda

 

 

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Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

Blog

Proverbs and sayings often provide us with wise words from all corners of the world. 

Best savoured a little at a time, these sayings are passed down from generation to generation.

Each Friday, I post a saying, or proverb and a quote that I find thought-provoking. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

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Don’t open a shop unless you know how to smile –
Jewish Proverb

 

Is this proverb just as it says, or could it have a deeper meaning?

 

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C.S. Lewis wrote, “We read to know we’re not alone.”

For years I read to my children, and all but one enjoys the fruits of a world of knowledge and ideas forged through either books, magazines or via the Web.  The youngest one, I am happy to say, has now discovered the delights of reading poetry! Perhaps those years of reading have finally paid off?

Reading is a solitary activity, yet it makes accessible a world of people and ideas, via our imagination. I am never alone when I read.

When I read non-fiction books, I am with the author, and in a fictional tale, usually crime fiction, I am in the mind of the protagonist.

Do you agree with C.S. Lewis, and do you always identify with the protagonist?

PicsArt_06-09-08.43.48
Now posting on Fridays

Amanda  – Something to Ponder About

Invisible Murder – Book Review

Vejen, Denmark

With the topic of refugees and terrorism very much in the news, this novel by Lene Kaaberbøl and Agnete Friis, is written for our time and makes for illuminating reading.

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Two impoverished Roma boys are scavenging for something to sell in the ruins of an abandoned Soviet military hospital. Purportedly to improve the lives of themselves and their poverty-stricken families in a rural village of Hungary, one of the boys embarks on a radical plan. Far away in middle class Denmark, Red cross nurse, Nina Borg inadvertently risks her own life and those of her family, to assist a group of Hungarian refugees but little does she know her actions will have disastrous ramifications.

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Source: Economist.com
“Jobbik. It had to be Jobbik, taking to the streets to protest the Jews, Communists and Romas from ‘ruining out nation.’ Lusja straightened herself up pursing her lips as though she had found something disgusting on her shoe. ‘God spare us from any more racist, goose stepping idiots.’ The driver turned in his seat. ‘Jobbik aren’t racists,’ he said. ‘They’re just for Hungary.’ Lusja straightened up in her seat and stared daggers at the driver, 128 pounds of indignant humanism versus 260 pounds of overweight-but-muscular nationalism. ‘And what kind of Hungary would that be?’ she asked. ‘A Hungary clinically scrubbed of all diversity? A Hungary where you can be arrested just because you skin is a different colour? A Hungary where it’s totally okay for Romas to have a life expectancy that’s fifteen years shorter than the rest of the population?’
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Source: Hungarianfreepress.com

A novel that is carefully crafted and well-balanced, allowing you to understand both sides, their personal  motives and furthermore, to feel empathy for the characters woven into the story line: The studious brother who in one brief moment is denied a legal career and betterment for himself, and his family, only because of a racially slanted agenda, his quest to save his wayward orphan brother who, by way of contrast, chooses an extremist, crash-through course of action, and the consequences for each; the innocent bystanders; the well-meaning humanitarians in Denmark, the terrorist thugs and ordinary residents of homogeneous, suburbia integrating with ‘foreigners’.

Are they all helping or hindering the cause? What toll does it take, personally, on those who help the less fortunate, the traumatized, the dangerous, and those on the fringes of society?

In the face of a changing Europe, this Scandinavian novel illuminates some salient points to ponder about inter-related events that shape our modern lives.

Rating 8/10

Other Novels by these bestselling authors: The Boy in the Suitcase