yellow and pink tulip
blogging, Photography

Friendly Friday Challenge – Colour Harmonies

Do you have an eye for colour in your photography?

Using colour helps to create mood and feelings in photographs and may result in a photo that is more pleasing to the eye.

trondheim
baklandet buildings

Photographers can create a heightened level of visual interest and enhance photos by seeking out particular colour harmonies in the environment.

Such colour combinations may be

  • analogous
  • complementary
  • monochromatic

Capturing Reds, Yellows and Orange tones is an example of an Analogous colour scheme.

Seeking out or deliberately combining the following colours may complement and enhance each other.

  • Oranges and Blues
  • Reds with Greens
  • Yellows with Purple

Keep in mind the saturation and the value of colours will alter the way they go together.

gardens

A split complementary colour scheme might include shades of Red, Orange and Blueish-green. Josef Alber’s images are an example.

traditions

Using a certain background colour in our photographs can also influence how our subject appears. There is more of an explanation here relating to using colour to enhance food photography.

This week’s prompt for Friendly Friday is for you to find or create

Colour Harmonies

Trondheim river

Create a Friendly Friday Challenge Post

Simply add a pingback and tag ‘Friendly Friday – Colour Harmonies‘ to your own post, then return here, leave a comment below adding your published link, so we can find your post.

If this is your first challenge contribution, there is a full set of instructions on how to join the Friendly Friday Photo Challenge on my blog header.

Everyone is welcome to join in.

I will return in two weeks time with another Friendly Friday post.

Next week, you will be in the able hands of Sandy, my Friendly Friday co-host, who will post the new Friendly Friday prompt.

fjord
Community, Painting

Color Your World – Extending my Palette

Over at Jennifer’s blog she is all about colour.

A daily ‘Color Challenge’ is running until next month. Such a challenge can help with understanding colour, its attributes and nuances, and how it makes us feel. Everyone sees colour differently.

Having a good sense of colour can help us make good choices in home decorating, in how we dress, in art and in how we feel, as colours around us can often affect our moods. Just think how we feel when the skies are dark and grey, as opposed to a sunny morning with a blue sky.

colour matching
Find your perfect colour combination

There are various colour matching tools on the web, (links below), that can help you find the colour that most matches the one you want for your art/decoration/clothing/craft. You can even upload your own image and analyze the colours there.

Today’s colour is PLUM. A full-bodied colour, often spoken about as if it were a description of a much cherished wine! Here’s why:

104_0427Which one is closest to your version of the colour, ‘plum?’

What colours affect your mood?

Colour Matching Tool

Colour Explorer Tool

#cyw or #coloryourworld

Something colourful to ponder about

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Painting

Faux Finish – Marble DIY Tutorial

blog pictures 019Ever wanted marble but could not afford it?

You can with this simple faux finish.

 

 

This project was originally a Dutch traditional painting with a dark orange background and the colours I had chosen, just weren’t working. So I revamped the project and decided to opt for something very simple like this:

 

 

To create your own faux marble finish:

1. Timber or MDF piece, sealed and prepped with a dark orange brown background paint.

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2. Mix a light green colour with some cream yellow, dark green, and white if necessary.

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3. Base coat over the top with the *light grayish green, and while wet, wet a sponge and pat over the piece. Note that this picture does not really show the correct colour.

blog pictures 007blog pictures 012

4. Lay a piece of kitchen or Glad wrap over the top and stretch and move around, then scrunching in a ball and dab it over the surface. This will lift some of the light green coat, revealing some of the background underneath in a haphazard way, that looks natural.

5. Dab on some light yellow and dark green, and even a little  Prussian blue on different sections of the damp sponge and pat here and there over the surface.

6. Use the scrunched glad wrap ball to soften any harsh lines from the sponge. You want it to blend gradually.

 

5. Dab on some light yellow and dark green, and even a little  Prussian blue on different sections of the damp sponge and pat here and there over the surface.

6. Use the scrunched glad wrap ball to soften any harsh lines from the sponge. You want it to blend gradually.

7. Let dry

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8. Drag a feather through warm white acrylic colour and pull across surface in wavy lines to simulate the cracks of colour in marble.

I used one from my pet cockatoo. ( NOte: It had fallen out, I did not pull it out!!!)

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You can also use a fine liner brush if you don’t have a feather.blog pictures 013

 

9. Soften with a mop brush or scrunched wrap ball if necessary.

* I don’t use retarder, which extends the open time of the paint, but if you are having trouble with it drying before you can manipulate the finish with the glad wrap ball, then either mix retarder into the surface of the light green paint, use retarder on the sponge as you paint.

Now you can decorate the rest of the project. Varnish as desired in the usual way. I use either spray or brush on.

N. B. If you want to decorate on top of the marble faux finish, a protective coat of sealer/clear glaze medium is advised.

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The completed faux marble finish

I will continue a tutorial on decorating the outer rim next time. Any questions, don’t ponder,  just ask!