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How to Design your own Artwork – Week #2 Design Challenge

Rosemaling

Every artistic piece contains some, or all, elements of design. These elements are then combined with a number of design ‘principles,’ in order to bring together an eye-pleasing, cohesive visual unit. Knowing these elements  and how to use them, can make all the difference between being able to produce an eye pleasing piece of art, or a disjointed, unattractive one.

Elements and Principles of Design*

Every visual piece is comprised of certain design elements or parts which may include Line, Direction, Shape, Size, Texture, Value and Colour – in that order. Design Principles, (which I will talk about later), are applied to the elements in order to bring them together into a cohesive unit. How the principles are applied, determines the overall effectiveness of a design.

This week we will examine LINE as an element in art.

wp-1472540410540.jpg

 

Week 2:   Line

As an element of visual art, line can be straight, swirly, wavy, jagged, dotted, dashed, broken, thick, thin, zig zag, diagonal, vertical, horizontal, curved, bold, parallel or perpendicular. It might outline a shape, form a pathway, (as in a curvy line), or a stroke. The line has width, or thickness, direction and length.

  • Lines can also convey movement and mood. Thick, straight lines convey order, stoicism and rigidity and this can sometimes be monotonous. Flowing wavy lines create softness, interest and melody.
  • In surface decoration, all lines should flow from a parent stem. No matter how distant, a line should be able to be traced all the way back to its branch and root.

Using Line in Rosemaling and Stylized Designs

A beautiful flowing design feels more natural and appealing to the eye, as the lines grow out from the other in gradual undulations. “If you have free movement in the lines and scrolls, you must have freedom in the flower and leaf forms to continue that feeling.” Nils Ellingsgaard said in his book,”Norwegian Folk art,”to “..beware of leaves painted at such an angle that they look as if they are falling off, or flowers that are way out on the end of a long stem.”

20170317_141507.jpg

The lines depicting the leaves on the flower on the left, are set too far apart and seem separate. The leaves on the design on the right, are implied as being part of the flower, and the base is hidden underneath the flower, thus, they have become an integral part of the design element.

Lines might be used as a border framing our design; lines might be cross hatching and even tangential lines can indicate a change in value, such as that which may simulate depth of an object, or a three dimensional quality.

 

Week 1 Sketch - Shape

 

Whilst our design ‘lines’ should aim for a cohesive design, it is okay to deliberately use broken lines in certain instances. In this case, our minds will fill in the gaps. Using deliberate, broken lines and varying their thickness and length, adds interest and moreover, is an excellent opportunity to add small details or embellishments, if you so wish.

Embellishments or liner work is another way to use ‘line’ to add vitality to a drawing or a Rosemaling design.  Nils Ellingsgaard said, “The skill of the Rosemaler is in direct proportion to the amount of variety he/she can get in his strokes.”

Nils Ellingsgaard liner work

 

Something Arty to Ponder About

Previous weeks:

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Forestwood
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How to Design your own Artwork – Week #1 Design Challenge

I love art but I don’t feel I am artistic; I love to draw, but don’t feel I am adept; I love to design but don’t have any technical training. What to do about it?   Thanks to the World wide web, we can learn a lot more about design techniques and apply them to our art.

Rosemaling

Every artistic piece contains some, or all, elements of design. These elements are then combined with a number of design ‘principles,’ in order to bring together an eye-pleasing, cohesive visual unit. Knowing these elements  and how to use them, can make all the difference between being able to produce an eye pleasing piece of art, or a disjointed, unattractive one.

 

Elements and Principles of Design*

Every visual piece is comprised of certain design elements or parts which may include Line, Direction, Shape, Size, Texture, Value and Colour – in that order. Design Principles, (which I will talk about later), are applied to the elements in order to bring them together into a cohesive unit. How the principles are applied, determines the overall effectiveness of a design.

Week 1 – SHAPE

Firstly, let’s look at the element: ‘shape’ and its role in design.

“A shape is defined as a two or more dimensional area that stands out from the space next to, or around it, due to a defined or implied boundary, or because of differences of value, color, or texture. All objects are composed of shapes and all other ‘Elements of Design’ are shapes in some way.”[Kovalik and King]

  • Mechanical Shapes or Geometric Shapes might be the shapes drawn i,n a design, using a ruler, compass or drawing template or tool. Mechanical shapes, whether simple or complex, produce a feeling of control or order.
geometric border
Geometric border using a ruler to space the mechanical shapes
  • Organic Shapes are freehand drawn shapes that are complex and normally found in nature. Organic shapes produce a natural freer feel.
dnikias.wordpress.com
Rangoli design using a combination of mechanical and free form shapes

Rangoli is a traditional and transient form of art drawn in chalk by Hindu women, in southern India, on the front steps and entrances of buildings as part of a daily devotional practice.  The decorations use ‘shape’ in a variety of styles and motifs which vary according to different tribal groups and festivals. There is more information about Rangoli here.

Rosemaling Styles

The Acanthus leaves is an organic shape used prolifically in Norwegian Rosemaling: particularly Gudbrandsdal style. Os Rosemaling frequently uses mechanical shapes such as circles and diamonds.

Rosemaling
Acanthus leaves in Gudbrandsdalen Style of Rosemaling
Norwegian Rosemaling
Os Rosemaling

Design Challenge

I am currently running a Design Sketching Challenge in a Facebook group I admin, and I’d love to extend this invitation to you, to join a blogging version of this challenge here, on our blogs. The challenge is a great way to encourage those who would like to sketch, but don’t yet have the confidence or motivation, to try.

Seeing others strive for, and share, their artistic journey can increase inspiration and awareness of one’s design skills. You never know what you are capable of, unless you try! You can opt in and out as you wish. See more about joining in below.

Here are my sketches based on the first prompt: Shape

Using organic shapes of leaves and flowers I found,  in my garden, I created this sketch:

Week 1 Rosemaling design challenge.jpg

It needs further adjustment and improvement, so I try another.

image

Still not satisfied, my final sketch for this first prompt, comprises circles, semi-circular arches, some natural elements in the leaf like scrolls and the heart-shaped flowers. I used a simple border to frame and hold together the design in one cohesive unit.

Week 1 Sketch - Shape

Would you like to join me in the Design Challenge?

What you Need to Do:

  1. Draw a 15-20 minute sketch or sketches using your own idea, or the prompt ‘shape.’
  2. Write a post about titled Design Challenge Week 1, upload your sketch and include a link back here to Something to Ponder About
  3. Next week I will post links to those blogs that participated.
  4. Leave a comment here on this post, so others can find their way to your blog.
  5. Follow me to view each week’s prompt posted on a Sunday.

Something Creative to Ponder About

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* N.B. I am not a tertiary qualified Art teacher and don’t purport to be one. I have based this information on my own research and experience. I am happy to take on board further input and or any corrections, deemed necessary, by way of comments on this post.
Community

Blueberry Muffins with Brown sugar

Blueberry muffins with fresh blueberries

We must take advantage of blueberries when they are in season. They are cheap as chips and so good for you, protecting against diseases and ageing, as well as helping to metabolise carbohydrates, proteins and fats, which is excellent if you are wanting to loose weight. Not yet convinced? Read more nutrition facts below:

Thus, I will share with you my recipe using brown sugar and a little butter. Nutritious, easy on the waistline, simple and quick to make, and very few dishes to wash up. That is the kind of recipe I like to ponder about on Tantalizing Tuesday.

BLUEBERRY MUFFIN RECIPE

2 cups Plain flour ( this means general all purpose flour)blog pictures 002

3 teaspoons of Baking powder

3 Tablespoons of Brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 egg

1 cup milk

1/4 cup ( 55 grams) melted butter

1 punnet fresh blueberries (that is around 125 g)

1 tablespoon brown sugar, (extra)

Method:

Mix flour, baking powder, sugar and salt in a bowl.

Melt butter in separate bowl, let cool slightly, then add milk and egg and mix well.

Add wet and dry ingredients together and stir gently for 30 seconds, or until well mixed.

Gently fold in blueberries. Don’t fuss too much. You don’t want to smash them like at Cold Rock.

Fill muffin cases 2/3 with mixture. Sprinkle brown sugar on top of each muffin and press down lightly.

A 12 muffin baking tray requires a moderate oven (190 degrees) for 12 – 15 minutes.

Test them close to the end of the cooking time to see if they bounce back when lightly pressed.

This is a good sign to say that they are cooked through.

Enjoy with a dob of sour cream or cream. ( if you are not counting calories, or course)

Makes 12 Muffins

Tantalizing Tuesdays

Blueberries nutrition facts

From: http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/blueberries.html

Sweet, juicy blueberries are rich in pro-anthocyanin natural pigment anti-oxidants.

These tiny, round blue-purple berries have long been attributed to the longevity

and wellness of indigenous natives living in the subarctic regions in the Northern hemisphere.

  • Blueberries are very low in calories. 100 g fresh berries provide only 57 calories. However, they possess notable health benefiting plant-nutrients such as soluble dietary fiber, minerals, vitamins, and pigment anti-oxidants that contribute immensely towards optimum health and wellness.
  • Blueberries are among the highest anti-oxidant value fruits. In addition, these berries have other flavonoid anti-oxidants such as carotene-β, lutein and zea-xanthin.
  • Altogether, the phyto-chemical compounds in the blueberry help rid off harmful oxygen-derived free radicals from the body, and thereby, protect the human body against cancers, aging, degenerative diseases, and infections.
  • Further, research studies suggest that chlorogenic acid in these berries help lower blood sugar levels and control blood-glucose levels in type-II diabetes mellitus condition.
  • Fresh berries contain a small amount of vitamin C, vitamin A and vitamin E. Altogether these vitamins work as potent anti-oxidants, which help limit free radical mediated injury to the body.
  • The berries also contain a small amount of B-complex group of vitamins such as niacin, pyridoxine, folates and pantothenic acid. It contains very good amounts of vitamin B-6, niacin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid and folic acid. These vitamins are acting as co-factors help the body metabolize carbohydrates, protein, and fats.
  • Furthermore, they contain a good amount of minerals like potassium, manganese, copper, iron and zinc. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese is used by the body as a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Copper is required for the production of red blood cells. Iron is required for red blood cell formation.
kremowki
Community

Kremowka – A Slice of heaven

I do like tradition and I do love sweet cakes – who doesn’t? Lin’s blog: Lin’s Recipes  provided an impetus for me to marry these two things in her February Cake Challenge.

ready to serve kremowskiLin challenged each person to research and make a cake from a selected list of old recipes and report on it during February. From the list of daunting culinary masterpieces, I chose a cake I had not made before: Kremowka. Kremowka is a polish cake sometimes called Papal cream cake or even Napoleon, after the two gentlemen who apparently were rather fond of it. [Well, that may partly explain their girth!]

But hang on, I thought! I am a complete failure when it comes to pastries…. in fact, I suck at them! With the exception of one ‘wholemeal flour – never fail quiche’ pastry that is in my baking repertoire, I give a wide berth to any recipes calling for pastry to be made, so how was I going to fulfill Lin’s challenge?  Scroll down to see….

The slice itself, comes with history: The story goes that one day Pope John Paul revealed to a crowd of onlookers how he was a big fan of Kremowka, or Kremowki, as it is also sometimes known in Poland. The Day after he said this, scores of devotees turned up to greet him, each bearing gifts of Kremowki, and ever since the slice has earned the nickname ‘Papal Cream Cake.’

kremowski after cutting

In researching the slice, I found a Russian “You-tuber,” who provided me with some useful (visual only), cooking tips for making Kremowki, whilst Polish recipe guru, Ania Culiniac, provided the recipe, which had apparently, been handed down from her father, (a pastry-chef from a top hotel in Warsaw). Ania’s  videos, [relax – those ones were in English], further assisted me with details, as I am afraid my knowledge of Russian is limited to ‘yes’ and ‘no’…….

Here is the recipe I used and a few extras if you wish to try the adaptations I made: –

 Kremowka

Puff pastry dough*

1 cup of Butter ( 230 grams)

2 cups of Milk ( 50 ml)

2/3 cup Sugar ( 150 grams)

1/3 cup White flour (85 grams)

5 Egg yolks

1 Vanilla bean

Icing sugar for decorating

  • Amanda’s optional extras: – Dutch Cinnamon Mix:-  1 tablespoon Cinnamon and 1 tablespoon castor or fine grain sugar;  1 egg white.

Method:

Pastry

  1. Flour your surface and roll out the pastry to 2 mm thick. Cut out two same sized rectangles. Ania used two A4 pieces of paper for guidance.  Transfer the pastry onto the baking sheet covered with baking paper. Cover with a tea towel and let it rest for 1 hour, otherwise it will shrink unevenly.**
  2. Pre-heat oven to 200 degrees Celsius.
  3. Brush the egg white on your pastry and sprinkle a generous amount of Dutch cinnamon mix on top.

    Sprinkle cinnamon and sugar on pastry
    Sprinkle cinnamon and sugar on pastry

4. Bake for around 20 minutes till it is nice and golden. Set aside to cool completely.

In the meantime, make the custard cream filling.

Cooked pastry sheets
Cooked pastry sheets

Filling

  1. Cut the vanilla bean lengthwise, remove seeds and add both seeds and bean to milk.
  2. Pour the milk into the saucepan on medium heat.Bring slowly to the boil, stirring occasionally.
  3. In a mixing bowl, place the egg yolks and sugar and beat till light yellow and fluffy.
  4. Add flour and mix till well combined.
  5. Slowly add the hot milk, minus the vanilla bean, just little bits at first, mixing constantly.  When you have added all the hot milk, return the mix back to the stove.
  6. Reduce heat and continue to cook stirring constantly, until it has thickened, like a pudding, this takes at least 2 minutes. Cover the mix with microwave safe plastic wrap and let it cool to room temperature. The plastic wrap with prevent a skin from forming on top of the custard. Don’t rush this step.  COOL Completely!!!
  7. Place the softened butter into the mixer and beat for 2 minutes till fluffy. Spoon the cooled custard cream, into the butter mix, one tablespoonful at a time beating well after each addition.
Mixing the custard cream
Mixing the custard cream

To Assemble

  1. Lay each cooked pastry sheet on the baking paper, cinnamon side down, and place a lightweight pine chopping board on top and press down evenly and gently. This flattens the pastry without damaging its airy texture.
  2. Lay one sheet of cooked pastry down for the base, (cinnamon side upwards)
  3. Pile the custard evenly on top.
  4. Place a second layer of puff pastry on top, (cinnamon side downward), and gently press. Even out on the sides with a spatula. Refrigerate overnight.
  5. The following day: cut into rectangles with a sharp knife.
  6. Dust heavily with icing sugar and serve.
Squashing the Pastry
Squashing the Pastry – easy does it….

 

The best part of the recipe is always in the eating…..

pastry ready for fridge
Pastry ready for fridge
kremowski after cutting
Cutting the Kremowki the next day

 

 kremowka
Kremowka ready to serve

 

Rating:  *********  9 /10

More fantastic cakes here

Judges for this challenge are Suzanne and Jhuls

** My secret to a good pastry – use pre-prepared pastry dough! Shame, Amanda: Shame!!!

Something for the taste buds to Ponder About

 

baking recipes
Community

Lingonberry/ Cranberry Slice – Tantalizing Tuesday

Well known in Scandinavia, the lingonberry is related to the cranberry, bilberry and blueberry. Berries are a great addition to one’s diet. Why? Because they contain powerful antioxidants  and provide many health benefits when we eat them. And why not enjoy them in a delicious dessert slice. This slice can be served hot or cold.

Tantalizing Tuesdays

More information on the health benefits is given below but here is the Scandinavian recipe:

Lingonberry  / Cranberry  Slice

 

Base:

4 1/2 dl (almost 2 cups) Plain white flour
1/2 dl (2/3 cup) Sugar
1 tablespoon Baking powder
150 g(5 ounces, almost 2/3 cup)
Unsalted butter
1 Egg
2 dl (3/4 cup) Lingonberry  or cranberry jam/ plum filling/ or your favourite preserves

Streusel topping:
1 1/2 dl (2/3 cup) Oatmeal
3 tablespoons Butter
1 dl (1/2 cup) Sugar
1 teaspoon Vanilla sugar (1/2 teaspoon extract)

Pre – heat the oven to 200 degrees C (400 degrees F).
Combine flour, sugar, and baking powder then cut in the butter.
Add the egg and mix well. Spread into a greased 20×30 (8×12″) pan.
Spread the preserves quite thickly over the batter.
Bake 25-30 minutes, until golden.

Cool in the pan and slice while still warm.
Enjoy served warm or cold. Yumm!!!!

 

Animal studies have shown how the lingonberry can lower inflammatory molecules, block oxidants from destroying tissue, and also help the body replace important antioxidants, like glutathione, which is a master antioxidant in our body. Lingonberry has also been shown to increase red blood cell and liver enzymes needed for antioxidant protection. We need antioxidants to protect vessels and nerve tissue, and also to help decrease the damage from inflammation. Proanthocyanidin extracts from lingonberries were also found to be effective against the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, which can cause a wide variety of infections.

[Credit: http://www.doctoroz.com/article/superfruit-lingonberry%5D

Something nutritious and delicious to Ponder About

baking recipes
Community, Food

Not Another Lemon Cake!

If you’ve been reading Something to Ponder About for a while, you might recall that I often will espouse the health benefits of adding lemons to one’s diet, in any form. If you are unsure what I am talking about, you can read more about the benefits of lemons here.

Lemon tree
“A lemon a day keeps …” well, you know the rest….

You might also know that I like that lemony ‘zing’ in foods, so you won’t be at all surprised to find me posting another  Lemon cake recipe. Although, this one is really useful, as it is quick and super easy, the Lazy man’s, (or person’s), Lemon Cake. You just bung it all in together and cook in the oven.

Lemon Cake

Easy Lemon cake

Ingredients

125 g Butter

1 tablespoon Lemon rind

2 teaspoons lemon juice

1 cup Caster sugar (or fine white sugar)

2 Eggs

1  1/2 cup Self-Raising* flour

*N.B. Self Raising Flour is a combination of 1  1/2 cup plain flour and 3 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 cup Sour Cream

1 tablespoon Icing sugar (to dust the top after cooking)

Lemon juice, extra

Method

Combine all the ingredients, at low speed in an electric mixer, until thoroughly mixed.

Increase speed and mix till batter is smooth.

Place batter in greased and lightly floured Bundt or ring tin.

Cook in a pre-heated oven for 45 minutes at 180 ° (that is a fan forced electric oven).

Cool for 5- 10 minutes and then turn out.

With a skewer, poke holes in the top of the cake and drizzle the extra lemon juice* on top.

Dust with icing sugar and it is ready to serve.

Simple, quick and very delicious.

Tip: The cake will keep better in humid climates if you restrict the amount of lemon juice that is poured on top.

Tantalizing Tuesdays

Something Delicious to Ponder About

 

Community, Painting

Upcycling – Stool/potplant stand 30 minute Makeover

IMG_20140124_163626.jpgplantstand

So many things are thrown away that are still useful.

This stool was just begging me to rescue it from a kerbside clean up.

And even with just a small embellishment, it has found a new home on my porch.

Steps to its New look:

1.  First a coat of Forest Green acrylic Gouache (artists quality pigments, but that is only my personal choice) House paint sample pots is fine.

folk art painted flower

2.  A good sand with 600 grade sandpaper and then a second coat of paint is mandatory.

3.  Draw a guideline of a central circle with chalk and then position the petals symmetrically around the circle.

4. Thin down a little warm white acrylic paint, (warm white is white with a touch of yellow added to take the “blue-ness” out of the white colour).

5. Paint  daisies or flowers of 6 -7 petals, with a paint brush, or, if a paint brush is not readily available, use your finger tip, (like the original peasant folk artists did).

I used a round brush # 4 with thick paint for texture. Smaller daisy petals can be painted with a Q – tip or cotton bud.

folk art painted stool

You could paint the daisies in a line, or in clusters, for something different. Tip: Clusters of odd numbers of flowers, look better than even numbers…why, I don’t know.

6. I painted the centre of the flower scarlet red with another dollop of paint, and a final flourish stroke/dot  between the flowers for interest.

IMG_4347

7. When the paint is dry, rub off the chalk lines.

8. Varnish if you wish, with water based varnish. ( Oil based varnishes tend to yellow as they age, but if you want this look, then oil based is ok too)

upcycledstoolVariation:

With some 600 grade sandpaper, lightly sand off a little of the forest green paint at the corners to reveal the original undercoat. A nice shabby chic look.

There – it is done. Thirty minutes later:IMG_20140124_163626.jpgplantstand

Ponder about something that needs a makeover.

Other upcycling ideas here:

Community

Tutorial: How to make lined envelopes

Wish I had more time to do these pretty crafts

So Many Crafts, So Little Time!

20130918-125846.jpg

Earlier this year I decided to share my trade secrets about how to make envelopes, and I was really pleased with how popular the post was! So I thought it was about time that I do a second envelope tutorial, but this time showing you how to make lined envelopes. They are really good for a special occasion and you can customise them to any colour scheme you want to. I used tissue paper for the lining, but you could use any pretty paper – just make sure that it isn’t too thick, otherwise it will be difficult to fold the envelope.

You will need:

Paper for the outer and inner envelope
An outer envelope template
An inner envelope template
Scissors
A glue stick
A ruler
A pencil
Double-sided sticky tape
A cutting mat (or flat surface for drawing on)

20130923-203850.jpg

Step 1: Make your templates by finding an envelope…

View original post 395 more words

Community

DIY Bathing Towel Apron

Fantastic idea for Mums of little ones. And a wonderful recycling/upcycling idea as well!

Diary of a Mad Crafter

I saw this idea on Pinterest (of course!) and thought what an awesome idea! When pulling babies and kids out of the bath, you can just cuddle with them and dry them off at the same time! I took a good look at the pic, and figured out how to make it. It’s super simple, and a GREAT baby shower gift!

I used a towel I had from home. We have collected way too many towels in this house and no room for them, so I figured I’d give one a good use other than sitting in the closet. I loved this print with the light blue (which was actually a pillow case–same thing, we collect this stuff without realizing, I tell ya)! You can either purchase 1 or 2 yards of the cotton fabric for this project (I’ll explain in the second step).towelapron1

The top part of my apron…

View original post 238 more words

Community

DIY: Pom-Pom Mobile

More things to do with pom-poms

Too Crewel.

It is no secret that I adore DIY home accents. I love little yarn pom-poms, and I’ve been wanting something that can easily hang in a corner. So then it hit me, a mobile.

Here is what you need:

  • Paint
  • Frame
  • Yarn
  • Cardboard
  • Scissors
  • Floss
  • Mason jar lid (optional)
So, you have all of your stuff ready? Here is what you do…
First, you need to make your pom-poms.
 You can check out this more in depth tutorial over at Stelabird, this is the one I followed when I first learned how to make them. It is super easy to follow.
Next step for me was painting the picture frame. I would have liked to have one with some more details, but I made this with items I already had around the house.
Nice and ugly before.
Nice and minty after.
The third step is to string your pom-poms.

View original post 129 more words

Painting

Hand Painted Flower – DIY Dry Brush / Overlay Technique- Free Pattern

A quiblog pictures 004ck but effective way to decorate a small object is by painting a simple garland of hand-painted flowers. “Oh! But I am not a painter I hear you say!!” Well, that’s ok, because you don’t need any specific skills for this technique. It is VERY forgiving! And it does not have to be perfect.

1. First, download the image of the flower in the garland below, and print it from your computer, or if you feel particularly competent,  hand draw on tracing paper.

2. Copy the image using chalk or pencil or transfer paper,  on card, fabric, or a paper mache/wooden box that has already been prepared with 1-2 coats of a suitable acrylic background paint. I use a transfer paper in light or dark shades according to the colour of the background paint. ( light on dark backgrounds, vice versa on light backgrounds)

3. Using your chosen dark colour, (in the example: Paynes Grey/Dark Blue) stroke in the petals with shape-following/comma strokes, beginning at the outside of the flower and pulling the strokes towards the centre, using a synthetic/sable round brush in size 3 or 4, depending on how big you want the petals.

*If you know how to do ‘comma’ strokes, use them, but a fine tapered tip near the centre of the petal is not necessary. So don’t stress. If you need more help in forming the strokes: see the linked articles below.

2013-04-11 tiffany heidi pics

4. Load a round or filbert synthetic brush (hogs hair or sable brushes don’t work so well here), with Warm White, or a light contrasting colour.

NB: In this technique, you do not wet the brush, or if you do dip it in the water jar, squeeze out most of the moisture, on some kitchen paper towel.

5. Begin to gently stroke in some colour, on top of the already existing blue colour, pulling just the top half of the brush over each petal, starting at the outer edge. Lift off completely before reaching the end of the petal, so that the darker blue colour will still show towards the centre. The dark colour then acts as your shadowed area, and the white is the highlighted area of the petal. This gives your flower more of a three-dimensional look.

6. Continue adding layers of warm white in this dry brush technique until you are happy with the effect.

Caution: It is always easy to dry brush additional highlight into the petals, if there is not enough, however, removing it if you have put on too much to begin with is extremely difficult and messy. **** If this happens, just re-do your basecoat of dark blue again, and start from #4.

7. If need be, use a brighter white, in an even smaller area near the very edge of the petal, to create ever more of a highlight.  Watch the leaf that has the turn-back, as this leaf will be in more shadow than the others, and as such, still retains most of the blue shade. flowercentre

8. Paint the centre with a ‘stipple’ effect, in a c shape, leaving the centre in the dark blue colour. The highlight colours I used include: gold oxide, yellow and white on the very highest edge. The ‘stipple’ effect is sort of like dot, dot dotting, the colour in just with the very tip of the brush. You can use an older brush for this, or a round hogs hairbrush, as it is not so imperative to have a fine point.

In this example, I also used the same dry brush technique for painting the leaves: Using a pine green colour for the base, and adding progressively more yellow to the green to get a lighter colour, using this as my dry brushed highlight.

Related Articles:

how-to-paint-comma-strokes-beginner-folk-art-painting-tutorial/

Flower

Image of pencil outline adapted from V. Phelps, FADP.

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