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Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

 

 

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

malcsine cafe

 

 

One hand washes the other – Polish Proverb

 

 

What do you think this old proverb refers to?

That we should help those who are of our ilk, our neighbours, our community? Or does it refer to a mutually beneficial partnership, similar to “If you scratch my back, I will scratch yours?”

Perhaps it refers to being self reliant?  Naturally helping oneself?

Could it be a spurious saying to motivate those who tend to be lazy?

 

 

Criminals usually prey on weakness. They can smell it. ~ Steven Seagal

 

Can they indeed?

It has been suggested that some criminals are extremely intelligent, but choose to use their intelligence for nefarious purposes. These unscrupulous types take advantage of perceived weaknesses. Profiling seems to suggest that certain criminals have an instinct for selecting their victims? Could Steven Seagal be referring to this sense?

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Join in the discussion by leaving a comment as to what these proverbs, saying or quotes mean to you. Have you heard them said before? In what context.

I would love to hear your thoughts.

proverbial-thurs

 

Proverbial Friday

St P A

Now posting every Friday – Always Something to Ponder About

 

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Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

 

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

bear and happy girl

“Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated.”
― Confucius

 

Have you ever been guilty of over-thinking a problem? It is something I think we are all capable of, and the concept of which intrigues me. Why do we opt for the more difficult scenario when a simple solution might rid ourselves of worry? Confucius was surely someone that was solution-focused.

Confucius 20160212_084943

The flip side of complicated situations might however, be seen to be over-clinical or lacking in empathy. It is then we must find a balance between our emotions and that of clear-thinking practicality. The endless battle between our heart and head. Is this one of the underlying messages in the following proverb?

 

Eyes

“Eyes that do not cry, do not see.” ~ Unknown

 

Something to Ponder About this Friday

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Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

River boats art

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

 

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.

 

I hope you will too.

 

 

 

Continuing with the present theme of Swedish proverbs, I found this thought provoking proverb. Why would a good man cope better?  Would not a devious, conniving man, or woman, succeed too?  But, of course, there is a price to pay for ill – gotten gains, isn’t there?  Is this what the proverb refers to, do you think?

 

“Bra karl reder sig själv ” – 

(A) good man will cope on his own ~ Swedish Proverb

 

sweden torg

 

Coping and being self-reliant is a goal many of us have, but failing to cope or, at least, being unhappy might also provide us with opportunities to learn, according to Bill Gates.

 

“Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning.”Bill Gates

 

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CC0 Creative Commons

 

Do you agree with the Microsoft wiz?

 

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment below.

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Proverbial Friday – Surely something to ponder about.

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Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

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I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.

I hope you will too.

Both the proverb and quote this week come from America. The proverb is an interesting old Native American saying –

 

“Force, no matter how concealed, begets resistance.”

~ Native American Proverb

 

Again from America, Mark Twain has some humbling words for us.

 

 

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What do you make of the proverb? Concealed force naturally gets people off side because it borders on trust issues. We trust that our friends are not going to hurt us, or force us against our will, because we do believe they care about us. If we felt they didn’t care, the friendship would wither and die.

We feel insulted if someone forces us to do something we don’t want to do. Sometimes we may dig our heels in and refuse, even if it is the sensible thing to do. We seem to like deciding for ourselves, which points to the intense need for self-respect.

Furthermore, it threatens our independence, choice making and self-control. All these things most people take for granted, and for someone to manipulate and force a course of action invalidates the person’s ability and right to choose for themselves.

Politicians might have sometimes forgotten the message the American Indian proverb is trying to convey.

I invite you to join in the discussion by sharing a comment below. Is force ever justified?

Does it always lead to resistance or compliance?

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Proverbial Friday – Something to Ponder About

 

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Poetry Writing tips and Challenge #1

You don’t think you are a poet?

I don’t believe it! Writing poetry is something everyone can do.

Poetry is putting your own thoughts down on paper, so how can that be wrong?

Benefits of a Poetry Challenge

Poetry writing can be a great way to express deep-seated emotions in a constructive way, helping us to process their inner meanings and significance.

Then again, your poetry might just be a little bit of fun. Rhyming poetry for instance.

Fellow blogger and writer, Ineke from scrapydo2.wordpress.com and myself, Amanda from Something to Ponder About , are jointly hosting an upcoming poetry challenge in English and in Afrikaans, in the WordPress community.

You are invited to join in. See instructions below.

A and I Poetry Challenge

Poetry Writing Tips

 

Honour the miraculousness of the ordinary. What we very badly need to remember is that the things right under our noses are extraordinary, fascinating, irreplaceable, profound and just kind of marvellous.

Look at the things in the foreground and relish stuff that can lose its glow by being familiar. In fact, re-estranging ourselves to familiar things seems to be a very important part of what poetry can do. [Source: From http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-29538180:]

On Using Rhyme: https://www.creative-writing-now.com/rhyme-schemes.html

Tips on Getting Started:

“The first step in any poem is coming up with something to write about. Don’t feel that you have to choose profound or “poetic” material. It’s easiest to write a good poem about something you know well, that you have experienced first-hand, or that you have nearby so that you can observe it carefully. This is because what makes the poem profound and interesting will be the hidden details or qualities you discover, or what the subject reminds you of, your unique perspective. With poems, as with other things (or so I hear), it’s not the size that matters, it’s what you do with it.In the beginning, you don’t have to worry about “style,” about writing in a “beautiful” or a “poetic” way. In fact, if you start to think about “being poetic,” it can distract you from what you’re actually writing about and hurt your poem.”

 

Challenge Hosts Amanda and Ineke

 

Why a Poetry Challenge?

Read more here here

 

What is it?

The Poetry challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers, and will run from March to October in 2018.

Each month we will post a prompt and helpful sites to getting started in poetry.

You can write in any language, it certainly doesn’t have to be in English.

Ineke will post the challenge in Afrikaans on her blog, so if that language suits you better, visit her here.

You Can write any kind of poem that you like. If you need inspiration to get you started:

The March Prompt:

Grab the closest book. Go to page 29. Write down 7 words that catch your eye. Use 5 of the words in a poem.

 

Here is my Poem for March.

 

ChristchurchPerhaps!

Perhaps, I will grow up to be a movie star or a nurse.

Perhaps, I’ll travel the world – when I’m all grown up –

Perhaps!

So perhaps, I will walk to school, run wild in the streets at weekends, have few time limits and even fewer parental eyes.

Perhaps, life will be simple and there will only ever be friends and enemies –

Perhaps!

But then, perhaps I will live a carefree life aboard a yacht floating the waterways  –

Perhaps, I will have a husband and five children and be up to my ears in snotty noses and wet nappies.

Perhaps!

Then, again, perhaps I will have an abusive spouse, end up penniless or in a hospital Emergency room,

losing my confidence and self esteem.

Perhaps, I will slowly rebuild my life and my identity, whilst forever remembering the scars.-

Perhaps!

And then perhaps, I will find a kindred soul, a kind family and be content.

Perhaps, I’ll find my passion in life that takes me places I never dreamed –

Perhaps!

So perhaps, it will be that I’ll face the sun so the shadows will fall behind me.

Perhaps, I will find that expectations and disappointment go hand in hand –

Perhaps!

Or perhaps, I’ll find that dementia steals away memories as I sit in an aged care facility, living out fantasies that won’t come to pass.

Perhaps, when my time is over,  I’ll make terms with the next journey –

Perhaps!

Or perhaps the mysteries and purpose of life will always be elusive.

Perhaps, just perhaps, there’s no certainty, only Perhaps.


Amanda

Now it is your turn to write –

Instructions for Joining the Poetry Challenge:

Sign up by leaving a comment on this post, so we know you are interested.

Ineke and I will post a poetry prompt and writing tips and links, around 1st day of each month.

You might need to follow our blogs so that the posts show up in your WP reader.

  • Using your own idea,  or the monthly prompt supplied, write a post with a poem, either fun or serious and post before the 27th day of that month.
  • Include in your post a link or pingback to both:

  scrapydo2.wordpress.com

 Something to Ponder About – forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com

  • Add the tag A and I Poetry Challenge to your post.
  • As ping backs sometimes don’t work, please also leave a comment at Ineke’s blog, scrapydo2.wordpress.com and Amanda’s blog, Something to Ponder About, with the url link to YOUR blog post on the challenge post for that month.   N.B. If you do this, others can find their way to your challenge post and create a supportive community too.
  • Include the Poetry Challenge badge in your post, if you so wish. (optional)

 

That is it!

Oh, and have fun writing!! Any questions? Just ask.

Ineke and I will post link backs to the blogs who have joined in with the challenge in the poetry challenge post in the following month, so that you can all find each other’s blog posts and build a new poet’s community!!

Sweden norway border fjell på grensen
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The Gnawing

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The Gnawing 

It’s there in the belly, it sits like a stone,

hard, heavy and dragging them down.

Gnawing in waves, tearing, grating, chewing,

Life imploding, no hope of renewing.

A breaking soul shattered to pieces,

like a mirror smashed by a rock, the light now ceases.

Disintegration.

No going forward, nor even going back.

So continue to clutch that unpredictable track.

It’s over too soon, and yet all seems so far,

Such destinations are never reachable by car.

Blow upon blow, a mind in torture,

The heart rent sore, bent beyond rupture.

And still the Gnawing is there, the closest companion in the darkness.

 

StPA

 

 

near roros P1000751
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Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

Proverbs and sayings offer up wise words from all corners of the world.  Best savoured a little at a time, these sayings are passed down from generation to generation. Each Friday, I post a saying, or proverb and a quote that I find thought-provoking. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too.

Continuing with the theme of ‘love,’ and ‘marriage, we have a somewhat reassuring proverb from the landlocked country of Burundi.

moon

 

Where there is love, there is no darkness –

 (Burundian proverb)

 

shadow

 

It is not a lack of love, but a lack of friendship that makes unhappy marriage –

Friedrich Nietzsche.

 

shadow

Do you agree with Nietzsche?

He is often controversial, often provocative.

Do you think this was his intention to be controversial in saying this?

After all, he had fairly fixed opinions of marriage, viewing it as a potentially lengthy conversation, in this quote:

“When marrying you should ask yourself this question: do you believe you are going to enjoy talking with this woman into your old age? Everything else in a marriage is transitory, but most of the time that you’re together will be devoted to conversation.”

 

flower

 

Proverbial Friday – Always Something to Ponder more About

beach storm
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I Grew Up, but Never Forgot the Summers of the Sixties

Mostly, one’s earliest memories lie dormant in the back of the brain, rising to the surface when a lucid dream, a particular smell, or thought, dredges out a memorable or perhaps, traumatic, childhood event.

So when fellow blogger, “Snow,” wrote about her experiences growing up, it was my Arnold Schwarzenegger, “Total Recall” moment: solid and colourful memories, with all the accompanying regrets, long forgotten smiles and laughs, came flooding back to me. Especially so, the memories of those long, balmy summer days were all there in my mind. And most surprising of all, these memories had been triggered after reading a blog entry, from the far end of the world. But why??

The blogger from TheSnowMeltsSomewhere lives in Finland, a snow laden, Arctic place, thousand of miles from my own childhood home. Yet, we discovered that through one of her posts, that our formative years were spent, not just in the SAME country, but in the very SAME city, and almost, around the SAME time!

surprise
Surprise!

Years later, our paths crossed again in the blogging world! Serendipity? Fate? Whatever! Sharing memories of our childhoods is a great way of creating our own histories, and allows others to have an insight into what life was like –  “back in the day.”

Painted Traffic light control boxes

Summer in the 60’s was so carefree

School Holidays

Australia has its long school holidays at Christmas time – because, of course, it is summertime then. In the sub-tropical part of the planet, summertime means thunderstorms, of the torrential kind. Uncannily, nature always seemed to time the heavens to open, over MY school, at 3 pm – the exact time when classes finished for the day!

This meant my walk home, (yes, everyone walked to, and from, school every day), meant that within 10 seconds, of being in the rain, my body would be soaked through. An umbrella or raincoat was next to useless, as the wind accompanying the storm, would blow the torrent, side and every which way, ensuring the body could not escape full saturation! But I survived, (which is perfectly obvious as I wouldn’t be writing this, if I didn’t), and the storm always meant a cooler evening and relief from the heat!

A good thing, indeed.

The Australian Summer, felt almost endless – school was closed for 6 weeks and it seemed like an eternity, for the first week or so. Many of the families I knew, either owned, or rented, a small beach house at the Gold/Sunshine coast, for the summer period and sometimes, I was invited to go along. I would always return home as red as a lobster, from long hours of exposure outdoors [read: we called it sun-baking]. Swimming costumes were the obligatory uniform of the day for children! Over the next week or so, my newly acquired “suntan” would disappear, as the sunburnt layer slowly peeled off, revealing pink fresh skin, underneath.

The beach houses were quite basic, inexpensively built and often smelt slightly of must/mould, no doubt from being closed up for long periods of time.  Kids were left free to wander the street and go swimming anytime they liked. I would often see kids of 5 years upwards, dragging their inflatable ‘surf mat’ behind them, to the beach. This was a kind of inflatable forerunner to the modern boogie board.  There was, of course, no shark nets, to protect swimmers from Great Whites, at the beach in those days either! I don’t even remember sticking to the “swim between the flags” rule! We knew that we should stick to that rule, but couldn’t be bothered to do so.

We thought we were invincible.

To think that children wandered the streets and beaches, mostly unsupervised might be tantamount to negligence today, but this was perfectly acceptable behaviour for the time.

STradbroke Island
Adder Rock beach

If you weren’t lucky enough to have a family beach house, or the weather wasn’t great, children would create their own fun playing cards –  ‘UNO,’ Switch, 21 or Snap or, if one was feeling particularly mean: “56 pick up.” Did you play that one? Board games like Twister, Monopoly or Scrabble were also popular, but much more fun with a group.

Like other kids, I’d often walk to the public park, possessing as it did, a motley, weather-beaten assortment of arm-breaking, metal and wooden, ‘play’ equipment. There was the mandatory See-saw, the potentially leg-breaking, always dizzying, spinning Round -a-bout, but my favourite was the red-hot, all-metal Slippery Slide, rusted and polished smooth by the many children who, just like me, scorched their bare legs and behinds, sliding down the metal surface on 30+ degree summer days.

These were the glorious pre-plastic days, after all!

Early instrument of torture in Playgrounds during the 60’s

Cubby Houses

As children, we never knew anything as technologically advanced as an ipad, Game-boy or x-box; so we had oodles of time to play with the things we found around us, in our world. With my brother, I’d build go -carts or “cubby” houses. I use the term “house” very loosely. Not having the resources to purchase a finished piece of wood from a Bunnings/local hardware store, children of the sixties and seventies, scavenged  instead for remnant pieces of wooden fruit packing cases, sourced from a pile of rubbish, behind the local fruit shop.  This wood was roughly sawn and full of splinters, and  might be nailed haphazardly together in some kind of semi- triangular shape, in the fork of a tree. We’d consider that project:- done! Cubby house walls were always optional extras!

What I always wanted my Cubby house to resemble..
What my Cubby house was like..   Nothing like the luxurious constructions seen in a Millenial’s backyard.

I always had grand designs in my head for a luxurious  ‘Bridge to Terabithia’ type of Cubby house, but I soon discovered that life isn’t like the movies. Our “Cubbies” turned out to be more like a workplace health and safety nightmare, resulting as they sometimes did, in broken arms. Falls from trees were a fairly frequent occurrence amongst the neighbourhood kids. Again, how did any of us not fall twenty feet to the ground and break our neck? Or drown rafting in a flooded creek?

Raft making in the 60’s with bits of tin in the flooded creek

We loved to explore the suburban wilds – intent on any adventure. It was not unusual to ride a bike for many kilometres into the surrounding rural farming area, just to see what was there, or, make rafts out of washed up walls of a Council work shed, or to swim where ever a body of water was found.

Swimming Pools

In our neighborhood, everyone had a swimming pool in their backyard. Big or small, they had something.  As there were no child-proof fences in those days, we just swam when we liked, completely without adult supervision. It was a given that kids in my area, knew how to swim.

swimming pool1
We never wore sun protective sun shirts in the 60’s like these kids did!

I recall one day, I went swimming, on my own in my neighbours pool; it was deeper than our pool and I could do back flips without fear of hitting the bottom, and back flip I did, for a half hour or so, until one back flip went slightly wrong.  I misjudged the angle of entry to the water, came up short, and scraped my nose on the side of the concrete wall. It could have been a lot worse than a mere scrape! O.M.G – as a parent, I think about this and wondered how on earth I made it alive, past the age of 13 years, without inadvertently killing myself or, at least, incurring a spinal injury of sorts???

But the safety of children was not a serious consideration, until the eighties, it seems.

Cars

Until 1972 seat belts weren’t even compulsory in cars.  This would mean that primary school aged kids were, more often than not, jammed, like sardines into the back of station wagons, (cars weren’t called hatch backs then).

The sardine troupe would often be ferried to a local pool or skating rinks by a lone parent. That same parent would proceed to unload the kids from the station wagon, and then drive off, only returning to pick up the troupe, hours later! This was the freedom of life in the 60’s and 70’s.  My kids think it is unfathomable that my life was like this!

Television

Television arrived in Australia in the late fifties, and by the sixties it had invaded our home too! It was the one electronic screen we had;  a Black and white TV, a little Astor model, (colour TV arrived in the late seventies), and I occasionally watched shows, such as, “The Jetsons.” The seven-year old me always thought it would be so awesome to have a robotic maid, like Rosie; was that really her name?

My brother was somewhat addicted to watching programs like:  The Land of the Giants, Lost in Space and perhaps the cartoon, “Gigantor”, too. It was just as well TV programming commenced in the late afternoon, otherwise he probably would never have gone to school at all.  [TV showed only screened for part of the day in Australia in those times, otherwise a black and white test pattern with awful background music was the only thing visible.]

And I do wonder why it is that I can still remember the name of the characters from those TV shows, as well as every child in my school class from those early years of school, and yet I find it so difficult to remember where I put the car keys, just two minutes ago?

Can you pick me out from the crowd?

Encyclopedias

Back in these days, there was no such thing as Google, or a computer, for finding the latest fact, unless you were talking about those brilliant female minds, who worked tirelessly, (without due recognition), for NASA’s early space program. A child of the sixties and seventies had to look things up in a book, either at the library, and few did that, or at home in an encyclopedia. Our nearest library was about 15 kilometres away.

Encyclopedias mysteriously arrived at one’s door, in a complete boxed set, from A to Z, usually presaged by a visit from a travelling salesmen, who would canvass would-be owners, door to door, with sales deals that “could not be believed!”

I think the Britannica clearly had it all over the Funk and Wagnells……

Sundays

Recently, I drove past my Grandmother’s former home with my youngest child – she is at that stage of life when she is learning to drive a car. In my day, we had to wait a mere three months, to sit the test, for a driver’s license, now they have to wait at least 12 months and complete 100 hours of supervised driving. This is a good thing, I think.  An improvement from the sixties! When I showed my daughter, her Great-Grandmother’s former property, it felt like I’d lived an entire childhood of Sundays in that place, as our weekly visits occurred, without fail.

The house that exists there now, is the same, but different. No longer recognizable, my Grandmother’s house has been raised up and another floor has been built-in, underneath –  in what feels like my space!!

My space: The space where my brother and I would spend hours forming roads for toy cars in the dirt, underneath the house. The same space that held the tank water tap where we used to quench our thirst and where you would find the old grey concrete tubs and gas fired boiler, where my Grandmother would wash her clothes and boil the sheets, stirring the pot, with a big wooden pole. Maybe that is why her sheets were so white!

I notice that the front yard, is still there. I feel like it is MY front yard, like I still have some kind of stake in it, having played in it, worked in it, and run around in it, for over ten years. I pulled and pushed a lumbering, old, metal push mower around that yard, every other Sunday, in summer. It was an ancient hand mower, that had a reversible handle, like the one pictured below, so you didn’t have to turn it around to mow in the opposite direction.

That was really the coolest part of it, I think.

mower

My Aunt and Uncle lived next door to my Grandmother, and as my Uncle was a retired war veteran, he didn’t do much except smoke and drink to excess, but he did breed budgerigars and chooks at the end of his enormous yard – that same yard that seemed ever SO big to me.

bird

I remember one year, my Dad killed one of the Uncles’ chooks for our evening meal. Unfortunately, he wasn’t too good at chopping its head off cleanly and it ran around the yard, half dead! As a town girl of 8 years, I was absolutely mortified.  I had never seen anything so raw and so cruel, yet my favourite meal was chicken, so clearly I managed to reconcile it somehow, in my child-like mind. Afterwards, my ‘Ma’ plucked the chook, showing me how to do this, by dunking it in hot water, to make the plucking process easier, yet I noted with slight revulsion, that a few tiny feathers remained on the carcass.

Cedar Creek, Australia

It seemed to me that Sundays at my Grandma’s house went by, ever so slowly, with nothing much, for a kid, to do. The adults sipped tea, ate Orange cake and Iced Vo-vo’s biscuits, talked and talked and talked, and when my brother, cousin and me were sick of playing in the dirt under the house, we would wander down to play in the nearby creek, catch tadpoles and make small banks to dam the water, just to see what would happen.

Iced Vo-vo biscuits

Today, the creek is the same, but different.  Flood mitigation has spelt the end of the rushing torrent this hapless stream would become after a summer thunderstorm. The trees on the littoral fringes have now grown so tall that no kids play in these waters now. Instead they seem confined, whether by their own volition or not, to their own backyards or, even perhaps, indoors with technology for company.

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By contrast, our days were very simple, we simply made do with the world around us.

To be continued/…… there is so much more to ponder about.

Thanks to Snow for inspiring this post.

sweden border
Community

Blue Skies – About Me

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Lorelle is relatively new to the WordPress world, and in support of her, I have decided to accept the nomination to participate in the Blue sky challenge.

Now, I hear that slight, almost inaudible inward groan, from the seasoned wordpress veterans, who have completed many such awards/challenges. However, it is my belief that the WordPress community is a supportive one and as such, we do everything we can to encourage new bloggers. This challenge is a way to do that and by doing so, discover new blogs and also for me to highlight other blogs, you have yet to come across.

Having said that, and bearing in mind the time constraints of such challenges/awards. I will highlight other blogs in accordance with the rules, but emphasize that there is not an obligation to complete/pass this on, to others.

So, here are the rules as I was given them:

  • Thank the person who tagged you – Thank ever so much Lorelle from AMindfulTraveller,  whose blog comes with the tag line Explore, Live Love.
  • Answer their 11 questions
  • Tag 11 people
  • Give them 11 questions to answer.

My answers to the questions

1. What is your “dream” holiday destination?

I am so fortunate to have already been there – Scandinavia and Poland, although Greenland/Antarctica would be wonderful, but it is unlikely that I will travel there.

2. The most disliked place you have travelled to?

Unfortunately, I would have to say Bangkok. Too noisy, busy, and Humid!

3. If you could learn a foreign language, which would it be?

Again, I already learn Norwegian, but perhaps I could extend that to Icelandic one day.

4. Do you prefer Summer or Winter?

Always, always a winter person…I simply can’t tolerate heat and humidity. I grow horns in summer!

5. What have you learned from blogging?

There are more similarities between people from diverse cultures than there are differences. We can learn so much from each other if we keep an open mind.

6. What is your favourite food?

Seafood and berries – I could just eat that for the rest of my life and be content

7. Do you prefer dogs or cats?

Definitely a dog obsessed person. Dogs are a treasured gift of unconditional love.

8. What makes you laugh?

Good question, Lorelle. Political Satire mostly, otherwise it could be dry wit.

9. What is the first thing that comes into your mind when you think of the colour red?

Recently, I have been instructing young ones on how to drive power wheelchairs so a red, stop sign,is the first thing, that comes to mind, otherwise the Dannebrod, the Danish flag!

10. One word to describe your partner/ loved one (if there is someone) .

Loyalty

11. What is your greatest fear?

Losing my loved ones

11 Questions I would ask:

1.Your favourite place in the world?

2. What keeps you young?

3. Something you would never ever do again?

4. Favourite book/author?

5. Thing you most remember from school?

6. Most important lesson you have learnt in life?

7. Tidy desk or Messy Desk?

8. Do you prefer forests or the seaside?

9. Style of art you prefer?

10. Favourite food?

11. Have you changed careers since you left school?

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Blogging is Something  Great to Ponder About

Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too.

You always learn a lot more when you lose than when you win –

(African proverb)

 

Do you learn most from a mistake or failure?

I think the act of winning confirms that you have completed the task well, and done most things correctly, and I would hope ethically. But in confirming our actions, do we learn anything of value? Isn’t winning simply reinforcing already learned behaviours?

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and the quote this week comes from a singer from the 60’s and the flower power generation:

 

“The more you live, the less you die”

– Janis Joplin

 

 

Was Janis right? Even though she passed away at a young age?

I would love to hear your thoughts.

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Community

To Honour the Best Dog in the World

TIFFANY :

Your first two years were difficult, but you found your way to Schnauzer Rescue and finally to us. One of our family was a bit reluctant to have a dog, but you quickly won him over with your gentle spirit, your kindness, manners, and limitless trust.

We loved you so much, and you returned this love more than hundred-fold. You found us a whole group of like-minded, sweet, new friends, and great dog friendly places to go.

Strangers stopped us to admire and pat you, often mistaking you for a Boy Dog and we’d have to tell them that they were wrong, that you were our ‘Beautiful Bearded Lady.’

You were such a great dog, so endearing; you knew just how to care when we felt the world was against us. You helped us through the darkest times, you were there often reaching those, who no one else could reach, with your love and empathy.

I miss your intelligence, intuition, elegance and dignity;

I miss the way you wrapped your two front legs around mine when you were feeling anxious;

I miss how you would gently remind us that it was time to go – that light touch of your wet nose on my leg, or that concerted flick of my wrist off the computer mouse with your “schnauze”, when you knew it was time to prepare dinner!

You always had food on your mind!

Dog photo

You weren’t really impressed when new little sister Rebel came to live with us in your twilight years. She tried to take your bed, your mat, your couch, and your food. In true Tiffany form, you were gentle and forgiving, often taking second place to the younger model, while still guiding this ‘interloper, ‘ in the finer points of Schnauzer Border Patrol Protocols: sniffing out and removing neighbourhood vermin, possums and skinks from the property. The ‘Usurper’ became your ears when you lost your hearing and ended up as a pretty good mate to nap with.

Life wasn’t always fun for you; everyone has their troubles, but you didn’t deserve yours. Two unprovoked attacks frightened you and took you down, a cattle dog that likely mistook you for a sheep – (what an insult!) and the second, a complete ‘blindside’ by a raging psycho Amstaff, who also attacked your new little sister and nearly killed you both. It damaged you and shortened your time with us. We are sad about that.

dog beach

Even in your final weeks, you were careful to prepare us for your departure; you slowly withdrew from activities, sleeping more and more, never showing us how sad you were to leave us.

At first we didn’t want to admit you were ill; we didn’t want you to go, but even then, you made it possible for us to hold you close until the last possible moment.

And then, – and then  –   you were gone.

I cry and I cry, but I know that the tears can’t bring you back.

We grieve for your companionship, your trust, the feel of your soft velvety ears, your big soulful eyes and yes, even for the feel of that wet beard that you loved to rub all over our furniture, especially after possum hunting.

It is selfish of us, but we still want you here, with us.

You are resting now in peace.

Our gorgeous Tiffany, forever, you will be our treasured, beloved Schnauzer. We will never forget your spirit and we’ll miss you til the ends of time.

You were the BEST dog in the world.

From your Loving Family   ♥♥♥♥♥♥

Someone I will Always Ponder About

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Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global words of Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too.

vikingboat-parade

The proverb this week comes presumably as far back as Viking times when woman used to wear their keys on belts around their waist.

Not all keys hang from one girdle –

Norwegian  Proverb

and a quote from  Henry David Thoreau, ( American essayist, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, and historian)

Bananas, Ballina, Beach, Bangalow and The Big Scrub

“Many men go fishing all their lives without knowing that is it not fish they are after.”

Comment: Thoreau appears to be thumbing his nose at those who appear blind in the metaphorical sense. Is he referring to those who bury themselves in work only to lament their all too brief time with family, upon their death bed or in infirmed retirement?

What is your interpretation of his words?

Henry David Thoreau anticipated the methods and findings of ecology and environmental history, two sources of modern-day environmentalism. His literary style interweaves close observation of nature, personal experience, pointed rhetoric, symbolic meanings, and historical lore, while displaying a poetic sensibility, philosophical austerity, and Yankee attention to practical detail.  He was also deeply interested in the idea of survival in the face of hostile elements, historical change, and natural decay; at the same time he advocated abandoning waste and illusion in order to discover life’s true essential needs.[Source:Wikipedia] and his sympathies for anarchy are summed up with his words:

“That government is best which governs not at all; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.”

I doubt that this sort of government appears likely or even practical as there needs to be some leadership, some central entity. I don’t feel that anarchy is even desirable. Every ship needs a captain. In Australian politics, one government leader attempted to  govern by consensus, which whilst admirable in terms of equity, did not serve the country nor the people well in practice.

What do you make of the proverb? And Thoreau’s warning on society and life? Is anarchy a tenable option in any way?

proverbial-thurs

Something to Ponder About

Aoraki
Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Words of Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too.

proverbial-thurs

You can’t wake a person who is pretending to be asleep –

Navajo Proverb

“And this is what really counts, not just achieving things, but the advantage you have taken of your opportunities and the opportunities you created. Each of us has to discover his own path, of that I am sure. Some paths will be spectacular and other peaceful and quiet and who is to say which is the most important? For me the most rewarding moments have not always been the great moments, for what can surpass a tear on your departure, joy on your return, or a trusting hand in yours? Most of all, I am thankful for the tasks still left to do – for the adventure still lying ahead”  –

Sir Edmund Hilary

Lunch with Edmund Hilary at 760 metres at MT Cook /Aoraki

I may be with the statue of the great mountaineer, here, but as a young child, I was fortunate enough to have him visit our school,  shortly after his  successful assault on Mt Everest. Hilary was someone who contributed to many and various social projects in Nepal, and maintained close relationships with the country and the people, all throughout his life.  This is Nepal. It touches one’s soul, and one can never completely eradicate the desire to one day, return again.

I think Hilary’s words are profound and inspiring to a younger generation for whom the conquest of the world’s highest mountain is merely not if it will be done, but how many will succeed.

What do you make of his words?

Is the Navajo quote referring to something deeper or merely pretense?

Lunch with Edmund Hilary at 760 metres at MT Cook /AorakiThat is Something to Ponder About

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