Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

Contemplation

 

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

The proverb, I have chosen to examine, this week is not listed as coming from any particular region of the world so that means it must have universal meaning. Right?

 

The dog that quits barking can get some sleep.

~ Traditional Proverb

Does it have universal meaning for you? What do you see as its meaning?

Are we always on alert, like the watch dog? Do we lack sleep or restful down time due to our vigilance? If so, vigilance over what, in particular? Jobs, family, children, religious rituals?

What is the proverb warning us about?

 

 

 

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Gympie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In honour of Australia’s  Anzac Day, I have chosen the following quote:

 

“If I had to take hell.

I would choose the Australians to take it, and the New Zealanders to hold it!”

~ Erwin Rommel

 

 

 

 

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However, for those for whom Anzac day holds no significance, there is this quote, in the current series from Ancient Greek philosophers:

 

 

“Reality is created by the mind, we can change our reality by changing our mind.” –Plato

 

 

Is seeing reality really perceiving the truth?

 

 

The message in Plato’s quote, was discussed, somewhat obliquely in the commentary, with blogger Mabel Kwong, last week. You can find it here if you wish to read the back story.

Please join in the discussion by leaving a comment.

Proverbial Friday really giving you Something to Ponder About

 

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Pumpkin – Eat Yourself to Good Health

Showing signs of fatigue, dark circles or puffiness, allergies, nasal congestion?

Then pumpkin is for you.  It’s contains 245 % of  the average person’s daily needs of Vitamin A, as well as antioxidants, alpha and beta-carotenes, and it’s a fantastic source of vitamins C, K, and E. Furthermore, it has magnesium, potassium, and iron, and fibre.

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Being such a fantastic source of good nutrition, one has to wonder why the humble Pumpkin is so maligned?  Children often turn up their noses at the thought of it and the Irish once considered it only good for pig food! Perhaps it is a little boring: after all, there is only so much roast Pumpkin one can eat. 

Here are a few creative ways for incorporating Pumpkin into your diet.

Ways to Eat Pumpkin

  • Once you roast it,  leftover Roast Pumpkin goes well in a Spinach and Rocket Salad sprinkled with a bit of Feta and balsamic vinegar. Delicious!
  • Incorporate it into a Roast Vegetable Frittata – Find that recipe here
  • Add some diced Ham, Mushroom and Caramelised onion pieces to a Roast vegetable pie.
  • Replace Pumpkin in any recipe that needs squash.
  • Dice into small 1 inch pieces and roast with Rosemary and Thyme til crisp. Sprinkle with Sea salt and eat as a healthy alternative to  Hot Chips.
  • Pumpkin seeds called Pepitas can be used to make Crispbread, Salads, Muffins or as a healthy afternoon snack.
  • Being a sweet vegetable it is great to use in Cakes, Scones or Pumpkin Pie.

When talking sweet Pumpkin recipes, my absolute favourite is Pumpkin Scones. Here is how I make them: –

Pumpkin Scones Recipe

scones

Ingredients:

  • I cup of mashed Pumpkin
  • 1 tablespoon Butter
  • 2 tablespoon Sugar
  • 1 Egg
  • pinch of Salt
  • 2 cups Self-raising Flour

Method

  • Beat first three ingredients together.
  • Add Egg, Salt and Flour and mix gently.
  • Add a teaspoon or two of Milk*, enough to make a wet Scone Dough that you can easily roll out to a floured board. * Often it is already of a good consistency and no milk is needed.
  • Roll out to 3/4 inch or 3 cm thickness on a floured board and cut into circles.
  • Place on a greased tray and brush tops of Scones with a little dab of Milk.
  • Bake in Hot Oven 250 degrees for 10 minutes

Hint:

To make Pumpkin puree to use in Scones:

Prepare to roast a whole Pumpkin by stabbing it with a knife once or twice to vent the steam, put the whole Pumpkin on a baking sheet, cook in a moderate oven at 175 C for an hour or so, until you can easily stick a knife into it.  Cool, then scoop out the seeds and string middle or pull out with tongs.

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Pumpkin Seeds

(Pepitas)
Pumpkin seeds, called Pepitas, are loaded with minerals, and it’s claimed they have an anti-inflammatory effect, as well as help to protect against prostate cancer and osteoporosis. A quarter cup of seeds has about 1.5 grams of fibre.

Hint: To prepare the seeds:

Let them dry on paper towels, then oil and salt them (add any other seasonings you want) and slow roast them in a 150 C oven until they smell good – about 45 to 60 minutes.

Stir them every 15 minutes or so. Cool and Store in an airtight jar.

Selection and Storage

  • Choose a Pumpkin that has firm skin, (no wrinkles), and feels heavy for its size. Knock on it with your knuckles.  If it sounds woody, it is ready to eat.  Stay away from the larger pumpkin, as a smaller and denser is better, in this case.
  • Whole Pumpkins should keep for up to 6 months, if kept in a cool, dry place.
  • A sheet or two of newspaper underneath the Pumpkin will absorb any dampness.
  • Once cut, Pumpkin will only keep for a few days, unless you remove the seeds and stringy centre and leave unwrapped in the lower part of your fridge.
  • Cooked Pumpkin will keep in the refrigerator for 4 to 5 days.

To read nutritional information about Pumpkin, click here.

Grow Your Own Pumpkin plants

The plant is a fast-growing vine, in my yard; it self-sows from my compost bin, creeping along the ground surface.  But throw a few Pumpkin seeds in the garden and nature will do the rest for you. You may have to water them as the vines do get thirsty.

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Pumpkin’s health benefits are Something we should all Ponder About

 

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Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

 

Failure is something we all encounter in our lives.

 

 

Failure is simply a step towards success as they wise words relate:

 

Don’t stop sowing just because the birds ate a few seeds. ~ Danish Proverb

 

magpie

 

Accepting its place in your life as a teacher, and moving forward despite failure, is echoed in the same theme:-

 

 

“Falling down is not a failure. Failure comes when you stay where you have fallen.” –Socrates

 

 

 Mary Tyler Moore, a woman ahead of her time told us to :-

“Take chances, make mistakes.  That’s how you grow.  Pain nourishes your courage.  You have to fail in order to practice being brave.”

 

Whilst Marilyn vos Savant reminds us that:-

“Being defeated is often a temporary condition.  Giving up is what makes it permanent.”

 

Several notable figures through history has reinforced that failure is not falling down; failure is staying down when you have the chance to get back up. Then why are we so hell-bent on creating perfection?

Failure just means you have found a way that doesn’t work, and if you get hung up on every failed attempt, you will miss every new opportunity that comes your way.

 

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All failures are just stepping-stones along your journey to success.

 

 

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How do you handle failure?

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment.

 

Proverbial Friday – Something to Ponder Positively About

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

maroochydore

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

 

 

“Even a small star shines in the darkness.”

~ Unknown

 

 

star
A star in the darkness
Confucius is credited with writing and editing some influential Chinese classical literature. His principles had a basis in common Chinese tradition and beliefs. As a man, Confucius championed strong family loyalty, ancestor worship, respect of elders by their children and of husbands by their wives and in addition, family as a basis for ideal government.

 

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His most famous adage for a good life is  “Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself”, the so-called Golden Rule.

 

The Golden Rule is well know throughout the world. Lesser known is the following Confucian quote:

 

 

“Attack the evil that is within yourself,

rather than attacking the evil that is in others.”

― Confucius

 

 

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Do you sometimes catch yourself feeling envious, or jealous in your dealing with others? I have this week been pondering the origin of these thoughts. The world now has an overload of information at its fingertips. Information about what we might aspire to, what we might desire and seek to obtain.

 

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We can never really possess anything, on a permanent basis. In truth, we have but a loan. A short term or long term loan. So why the feeling to have what another has been fortunate to possess on their short term loan?

Where does it stem from?

Join the discussion by leaving a comment below.

 

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Proverbial Thursday – now posting on Fridays at Something to Ponder About

Proverbial Friday- Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.

I hope you will too.

No river can return to its source, yet all rivers must have a beginning.

 Native American Proverb

 

Are we really simply talking about a river here, or our inner yearning to be a child again, to be free of responsibility, to be carefree, unburdened and spontaneous?

We may not be able to start completely over, when things go badly, but we can start somewhere, and from there move forward. Do you agree?

Or could you think of another metaphorical application for this proverb?

The quote I have chosen this week also refers to the theme of childhood.

 

Painted  girlfriends Traffic light control boxes

 

 

Children are not things to be molded, but are people to be unfolded.”

Jess Lair, Author

 

What do you make of the words of Proverbial wisdom this Friday?

Are they Something to Ponder About?

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment. I would love to hear your thoughts.

 

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