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Proverbial Thursday – Global Words of Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

xanthostemon chrysanthus

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

A Bad Worker Quarrels with his Tools –  Chinese Proverb

 

and this:

 

“All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”

 

“If you look for perfection, you’ll never be content”

Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

I have always thought to do a good job, it is important to have the right tools, but that isn’t always possible, so if we quarrel with the second-rate tools, are we still a bad worker?

I can see a correlation between the two quotes, from Leo Tolstoy. Can you?

I would love to hear your thoughts.

Proverbial sml

Something to Ponder About this Thursday.

 

 

 

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Friday Fiction Review : Hypothermia – by Arnaldur Indridason

 Hypothermia  – by Arnaldur Indridason

Book - The cop killer
Nordic crime fiction books

A Reykjavik Murder Mystery

It is a cold Autumn night, the ice has already formed in chunks on Lake Thingvellirvatn… In a holiday cottage a Doctor’s wife is found hanging. She has a history of depression and her Mother recently died of a terminal illness. But is it suicide… Erlender the gloomy and withdrawn Rejkjavik detective must decide. This case is unofficial, it won’t change the outcome of the case and everything is clear cut. Yet Erlender pursues it like a murder case with a drive to find out why the woman’s life ended in such an abrupt manner. As he begins to collects information, he again faces his own personal demons and confronts cold missing persons cases that have laid dormant for years with some suprising results….

The Good:  A wonderfully written Scandinavian crime mystery; a delight for continuing readers of Indridason as the character continue their own personal story; atmosphere plus in descriptions of Glacial lakes, blizzards and cold desolate landscapes..

The Bad:  Hard to find fault… but I am partial to this genre…

The Ugly: Predictable in parts, but not boring…. No happy ending…. but this is not ugly either…

Verdict: RECOMMENDED

Other titles by Indridason: ( these have been translated to English)

Jar city ( aka Tainted Blood)
Silence of the Grave (to be read soon I hope)
Arctic Chill
Voices
The Draining Lake

Book review, Community

Book Review – “The Snowman”- Jo Nesbø; Harry Hole Series

Book review - The REDEEMER by Jo Nesbø, Crime fiction pick of the monthHarry Hole gets under your skin, and you feel ambivalent about him as a cop. There is much to dislike, in Nesbø tough, cool and marginal hero, but still we like him because he is almost as familiar as a dog-eared toothbrush. Just when you are feeling comfortable, it is at an end and time to start a new one.  And so it is with the Nesbø books.

They are fantastic reads, and one becomes so close to Harry, the central character, that one can predict his move, but then, he surprises us, with a twist we did not see coming.

As luck would have it, I have just finished reading The Bat, Nesbø’s first novel, (although published in English much later in the Harry Hole series), and The Snowman, refers to circumstances from The Bat, although I had no way of knowing that it would be releveant. Harry is convinced a serial killer is operating in Norway, and his expertise from his Australian trip (detailed in The Bat), both assists and  arrests progress in identifying the killer/s. (excuse the pun). An alarming number of wives and mothers have gone missing over the years, often occurring when the first snow comes to Norway…..

The house was large and yellow. Too big for a family of three, Harry thought, as they walked up the shingle path. Everything around them dripped and sighed. In the garden stood a snowman with a slight list and poor future prospects.

In an interview, Nesbø said he felt he went a little far in this and the next novel, The Leopard, which I am yet to read, and that he regrets that. He also said that the seemingly indestructible Harry will be killed off/retired in future novels.

There is some interesting commentary about policing in the novel when Katrine Bratt, a new detective from Bergen is assigned to help him on the case and when discussing whether beautiful people are more preoccupied with beauty than ugly people  obsessed with looking good even to the point of undertaking cosmetic surgery:

“I don’t know.” Karine said. “People with high IQs are so fixated on IQ that they have founded their own club, haven’t they? I suppose you focus on what you have. I would guess you’re fairly proud of your investigative talent.” 

” You mean the rat-catching gene? The innate ability to lock up people with mental illnesses, addiction problems, well under average intellect and well above average childhood deprivation?

Later in the book, Aune, Hole confidante and former psychological colleague, make a meaningful commentary about society, and punishment of crime.

 “The more aged I become, the more I tend to the view that evil is evil, mental illness or no. We’re all more or less disposed to evil actions, but our disposition cannot exonerate us. For heaven’s sake, we’re all sick with personality disorders. And it’s our actions which define how sick we are. We’re equal before the law we say, but it’s meaningless as long as no one is equal. During the Black Death, sailors who coughed, were immediately thrown overboard. Of course they were. For justice is a blunt knife, both as a philosophy and a judge.”

This story has the hallmark of Nesbø twists and turns, but the astute reader should be able to determine the culprits, despite the detours Nesbø puts in place. As one questions the various dances, the author makes his characters play, it is becoming easy to see I should listen to those questions more, if I want to solve the crime sooner.  Nesbø is a fantastic author and if you have never before read Scandinavian crime fiction, he is the one to read……

Rating:

The good: Descriptive, intriguing, and there is a snow man in the story!

The bad: Hole’s miscalculations and errors…. he is starting to slip up.

The Ugly: The crimes themselves……

9/10

Next on the TBR pile: Anne Holt 1222

Something to ponder about.

Community, History & Traditions

Proverbial Thursday – Proverbs from around the World

I find profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and marvel at the way they can be so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and across cultures, and speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes like proverbs, can make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought provoking.  I hope you will too.

Danish proverb:Image

Det behøver ikke koste en bondegård
= English: It does not have to cost a lost of money (literally: It does not have to cost a farm)

“Health is the greatest gift, contentment the greatest wealth, faithfulness the best relationship.”

(Buddha)

Something to ponder about.

Community, History & Traditions

Proverbial Thursday – Proverbs from around the World

Proverbial Thursday – Proverbs from around the World

I find profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and marvel at the way they can be so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and across cultures, and speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes like proverbs, can make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought provoking.

I hope yoIcelandu will too.

“He who hurries cannot walk with dignity.” In a Chinese fortune cookie

and a Finnish Proverb given to me by a blogger friend, Travel Bungle

“Keep going, said the old woman in the deep snow”

Rama said “We have no right to ask when a sorrow comes, ‘Why did this happen to me?’ unless we ask the same question for every joy that comes our way.” This one is particularly pertinent for me this week, having lost a family member.

Special words for you to ponder about this Thursday.

Community, History & Traditions

Proverbial Thursday – Wise words from around the World

Proverbs and sayings are uttered so succinctly that much can be learned from a few small words. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from many generations and cultures, and speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned.

Quotes like proverbs, can make us think more deeply about something.Europe 2011second batch 038

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought provoking. I hope you will too.

Special words for you to ponder about on Thursdays.

One meets his destiny often in the road he takes to avoid it.
French Proverb

God has no religion. Gandhi

Community, History & Traditions

Proverbial Thursday – Proverbs from around the World

Proverbs and sayings contain so much wisdom, and are usually utterly so succinctly, in just a few small words. They carry the wisdom down with them via many generations. Each thursday, I post a proverb and a saying or Quote, that I find thought provoking. I hope you will too.

Something to ponder about on Thursdays.

“Promote what you love instead of bashing what you hate.”

Vigeland Sculpture park, Oslo

Another Norwegian proverb:

“Det er ikke gull alt som glimrer”–All is not gold that glitters.

Book review, Community, History & Traditions

New Ebook Scandinavian Mystery – Book Review

I have previously been a beta tester for an author who lives in Denmark, and writes in English, I would like to spread the work about one of her books, which I have read, which is now on Kindle, downloadable for free.DorteHummelshoy Jakobsen

This novel is set in Denmark and Sweden and paints a portrait of a two families at different historical time frames.  I personally loved the descriptions of life in the early twentieth century Sweden and could easily imagine a visual translation of the words, thanks to Dorte’s descriptive writing.

The tale has some dark overtones, but can be insightful for anyone who is interested in social history or family history especially from Scandinavia. Crime novels from Scandinavia are often more detailed about the characters and the personal struggles than the intrigue, and I think that could be said for one of the protagonists in this novel as well.

I absolutely loved the way she included hymns or songs in Swedish, throughout the diary entries of Swedish Anna, and would also use Danish words here and there, and included a glossary to aid translation. This really added a layer of authenticity to the writing.

I am happy to recommend her book.

Amazon’s precis:

This is the story of a young Danish woman, whose life is in a rut. Anna Storm is unemployed, her father is seriously ill, and her best friend and neighbour receives mysterious threats. Anna is a very ordinary antihero, so even when her friend dies unexpectedly, she keeps burying her head in the sand.

Then she finds her Swedish grandmother’s old notesbooks, however. Anna is spellbound by the beautiful drawings and the sweet story of her grandmother’s everyday life. Finally, she has found a worthy project to engage in. As she reads her grandmother’s family chronicles, it dawns on her that the books are not suitable for children at all, but that the sinister story which is hidden between the lines may give Anna a much needed push. Anna wakes up – but is it too late?

For readers of {Dorte’s}Knavesborough series: please note that this book is not a cosy mystery, and I do not recommend it for children.

(The knavesborough series are light hearted detective stories, set in England)

The difference between the Anna Marklin story and the previous Knavesborough, is a sign of the author’s versatility and depth as a writer. Something to ponder about.