helnaes
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Hometown Conversations

Sønder Felding
My 7th Great Grandfathers house Sønder Felding

Hometown – Home – Hjem

What does it mean?

There is that trite saying – “Home is where the heart is,” but that saying means little to me. My current hometown is a relatively new one, at the Home by the Sea.

Origins

Whilst my blogger colleague, Sandy has lived in many different places in many countries, I have lived in just four cities my entire life, and all four in the same country, Australia. Three in the same state. Yet it is a different country on the other side of the globe to me, that captures what most would recognize as a feeling of home. Home: that warm fuzzy feeling of sanctuary one gets when they hear that word.

I never felt that feeling in any of my previous hometowns and don’t like to dwell too much on them, much less write about them. But there is one place that I felt completely relaxed and ‘hyggelig,’ and that was the time I spent in Denmark. Danes have such a knack for creating a comforting, cosy atmosphere in their homes that they invented a unique word to describe it. Hygge.

Growing up in Australia, I actually knew very little of Denmark and even less about the town my family came from. I had seen a photograph and read a book in 1995, but that was pretty much all. The pictures in that book were a revelation and they entranced me. From that moment, I was on a mission to figure out how I could visit that magical place and my family’s hometown.

Arriving in Denmark

I longed to visit Denmark and I’d waited and saved for years. Despite this, it seemed both corny and surprising that when that SAS aeroplane, I was seated in, touched down on the tarmac of that longed-for country, I had a strong sense of relief wash over me, a sense of coming home. Could I put that down to wishful thinking and finally reaching my goal? If so, why was I so utterly surprised at the extent of this overwhelming feeling I couldn’t get out of my head? Being there at that moment, just felt right.

From Tower Ribe Cathedral Denmark

DNA Memory and Research

Some think there is more to DNA memory. That you can remember certain things through the generations and heredity.

Animals such as mice, have been able to pass on useful environmental information learnt during their lives to their offspring two generations hence, even though it was not in their original DNA. This appears to occur after a traumatic event.

Scientists have conducted studies with roundworms that indicate they can ‘remember’ information for up to 14 generations.

Don’t you think that is fascinating?

That a Grandparent or ancestor might learn a vital piece of information in their early life and you, as a grandchild or descendant might express, feel, exhibit or react to, a certain stimulus in the same way as that Grandparent might have done?

This may be what happened when I visited Denmark. Whether it was DNA, or the expression of a gene with a particular leaning towards certain environmental factors, or something else. I can’t say.

Marienlyst

Do you have a longing to a certain place? Is it your home or is it another place in the world?

Join the Conversation with Sandy and Amanda on your hometown.

den gamle by
Community

Getting Old

It happened quite suddenly.

The feeling that the Moth, (Man of the House), and I are becoming a bit…. old.

I shouldn’t be surprised, as this feeling isn’t really that new.

I first felt like this, when I turned thirty years old. How silly was I then? But of course, 30-year-olds don’t always have any point of reference for what older age really feels like, until now.

We feel our age a little more, every time a milestone passes. You know the sort where we get to celebrate yet another 12 wonderful months of life on this planet? Except you reach a point where you don’t want to celebrate the number, anymore. It is almost a forbidden word once you pass three score years, which I haven’t quite reached yet, but the Moth most certainly has.

Today, however, I did feel extra old, particularly when the Moth asked me a question and the ensuing conversation went like this:

“Have you seen that blue cold pack from the freezer?”

“No, should I?” (have seen it?)

“I just had a look and it isn’t there.”

“Are you sure?”

“You know – the blue one.”

“I’ve never seen a blue cold pack, but I did see an orange one there, last week.”

“Yeh – the orange one.”

(Sigh). “Yeh, it’s in there.”

“Where?”

“In the freezer?” [Long Pause].

“What’s in the freezer?”

“The Orange Cold Pack.”

“No, it’s not.”

“Have a look.”

“I did. It’s not there.”

“Well, have another look.”

“I did. It isn’t there.

“Check again.”

“Oh – there it is. I’ve found it!”

(sigh)

And there we have it. It is official.

Suddenly we are old.

mountain
Community

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures.

They speak of experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

The doorstep of the palace is very slippery

– Polish Proverb

palace warsaw 20160702_103444

 

“The hardest thing to do is to be true to yourself, especially when everybody is watching.”

-Dave Chappelle

 

Bergen view

 

What do you make of the Polish proverb?

Is it a warning against brown-nosing the elitists or those in authority?   

and as for the Quote this week:

Do you agree with Dave Chapelle? 

I would love to hear your thoughts on this week’s sayings.

Please feel very welcome to join in the discussion, by leaving a comment, below.

 

StPA

 

Linking also to the Three day Quote challenge.

If you wish to join in, check out Purple Pumpernickel for the Rules.

BlogNow posting on Fridays

 

 

bird-talk-yell
Community

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures.

They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

Photo by Flickr on Pexels.com

 

When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers.

Indian proverb

 

 

 

Photo by shy sol on Pexels.com

 

 

“They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, I told them they didn’t understand life.”

–John Lennon

 

 

 

Feelings are like chemicals, the more you analyze them the worse they smell.

~ Charles Kingsley

 

 

 

Charles Kingsley was a English clergyman, university professor, historian, and novelist, who must have had some strong feelings that greatly disturbed him. I am certain that thinking for too long about something might be a curse, in that one sometimes feels that there’s never a moment of peace, in one’s own mind, from the self-talk.  The memory receptors, in our brain, work by reconstructing events, and with each recall of memory, there appears to be a slight change or enhancement of the memory, so if they are recalled often, they might be far from the reliable truths we regard them to be. More often, we find memories are often peppered with an individual’s own particular bias, rather than a precise itinerary of events.

But the Indian proverb, refers to something completely different, don’t you think?

Or can you see a correlation between quote and proverb?

 

I would love to hear your thoughts.

Please feel very welcome to join in the discussion, by leaving a comment, below.

 

 

 

Linking also to the Three day Quote challenge.

If you wish to join in, check out Purple Pumpernickel for the Rules.

Blog

Now posting on Fridays

Indeed this is something for us to ponder about