Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

proverbial thursday

 

There are many paths to the top of the mountain, but the view is still the same.

– Chinese proverb

 

Mt Pilatus

This Chinese proverb is reassuring to those who sit outside the box, to those who don’t fit the mold, non-conformists who are so often cast aside from the mainstream, as being less valued.

We all, every single one of us, ends up in the very same place There is no immortal life on earth. Death is a leveling experience. The thought that we are racing headlong towards the end of life has slipped the mind of some, has run past many others, whilst a few appear hell bent on getting there before anyone else.

To paraphrase a song lyric:  “The race is long, but in the end, it is only with yourself.”

 

Confucius 20160212_084943

 

“How abundantly do spiritual beings display the powers that belong to them! We look for them, but do not see them; we listen to, but do not hear them; yet they enter into all things, and there is nothing without them.”

― Confucius

 

Confucius has many profound things to say, and this strikes me as pertinent, both from a religious and secular angle. The human race is not convinced about the existence of supernatural beings or extra terrestrials, strange metaphysical happenings, ESP, intuition, citing the need for tangible evidence before any acknowledgement is publicly given, yet religion heavily relies on intangible belief and imagination from the flock.

Trondheim

 

Something to Ponder About this Friday

StPA

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My Frozen places

Snowball Zermatt

Take a tour with me –

 

Iceland – the ultimate Frozen landscapeIceland Thingvellir

 

A snow bunny in the frozen Norwegian countrysideOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Delicate frozen-ness atop the Swiss Alpssnow

 

Icy vastness in the Antipodes of New Zealandsnow

 

Even in Australia, one can find frozen Gum treessnowgums falls cree 2011

 

The snow was icy and ‘sharp’ this day. If you fell skiing, it really hurt!Beitostolen

 

A face that could freeze hearts!

snow

 

Linking to the Travel theme: Frozen

 

Walking with Edmund at 760 metres

Once a humble beekeeper, Sir Edmund Hillary came to know this mountain very well. For it was here that he would hone his mountaineering skills to become the first man, along with Tensing Norgay Sherpa, ever to reach the summit of the tallest peak in the world – Mt Everest.

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Hillary was certainly an imposing figure, even in Bronze. The man was apparently very tall, and perhaps this is what gave him an edge over other mountaineers, when climbing with cramp-irons on his feet up vertical ice cliffs….??

His statue stands at the Hermitage Hotel at Mt Cook, New Zealand, a place that came to be his second home. Known as Aoraki in the Maori tongue, I stopped here en route to Queenstown and took a walk around the Mt Cook vicinity.

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Yes, I was mad enough to go to the South Island of New Zealand in the middle of winter!!

Mt Cook is in the South Island of New Zealand and a stunning place of phenomenal beauty, yet a very unforgiving place.

 

There was a patch of blue sky in the far distance, which looked promising for my walk, but at this altitude, the weather can change exceedingly quickly so there was no guarantees.

So my walk entailed being extremely careful when I stepped, not wanting to fall on the ice like I did, once, in Norway. That little trick rendered me unable to walk properly for weeks.

Ouch!!

The flora around the Hermitage area is very much alpine heath, struggling to survive in a harsh environment, although there are also sheep grazing here. The finest merino wool in the world, is in fact, grown a few kilometres away, at Mt Cook Station.

 

The sheep seem to have right of way here, at one point we had to ‘split the mob’ to get through.

Mt cook sheep
The finest fleece – Mt Cook’s Flock

In the area around Mt Cook, you can also see the most delightful blue snow/glacial fed lakes, like this one which form part of the hydro and irrigation scheme.

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We had to walk back very quickly to the Hermitage, as the weather was closing in, fast.

 

Lunch was a quick bite in the hotel restaurant and whether it was due to the intense cold, I am not sure, but it tasted really delicious. And prices were very reasonable. They do have a monopoly as it is the only place to eat, for miles and miles, But oh! I would pay a lot more for such a meal when one can take advantage of that very special view.

We ate in front of these magnificent full length glass windows at the hotel admiring the view. You can also get an idea in the reflection of the windows….

There was then only a little time for my daughter to throw around some snowballs and slide up and down the slopes on a toboggan, which the lady at the hotel reception said we could use free of charge.

She was so kind, and it seemed that her manner was from a bygone era, when you do things for free, with no expectation of returning the favour.

(Great New Zealand hospitality!)

It is claimed by some, that New Zealand is a rather conservative place and that they are still a bit stuck in the past at the end of the world. Well if that is the case, it is not a bad way to be, is it?

And certainly not a bad place to be stuck, either.

All too soon, it was time to leave and I was left with the memory of these wild and extreme walks, I took, at Mt Cook.

Linking to Jo’s Monday Walk

Jo’s walk this week is to Carding Hill Valley

New Zealand
Restless Jo Monday Walks
Footnote: Up to 1953, seven separate climbing expeditions had thus failed to reach the summit of Everest, but on May 29th, Hillary and Tenzing Norgay, a native Nepalese climber who had participated in five previous Everest trips, were the only members of the party able to make the final assault on the summit. At 11:30 in the morning, Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay reached the summit, 29,028 feet above sea level, the highest spot on earth. As remarkable as the feat of reaching the summit was the treacherous climb back down the peak.Throughout the rest of his life, he worked tirelessly on humanitarian and fund raising projects, building schools, health clinics, and many aid projects for his beloved country of Nepal, (a country dear to my heart), until his death from heart failure in 2008.

Proverbial Thursday – Global Words of Wisdom

Aoraki

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too.

proverbial-thurs

You can’t wake a person who is pretending to be asleep –

Navajo Proverb

“And this is what really counts, not just achieving things, but the advantage you have taken of your opportunities and the opportunities you created. Each of us has to discover his own path, of that I am sure. Some paths will be spectacular and other peaceful and quiet and who is to say which is the most important? For me the most rewarding moments have not always been the great moments, for what can surpass a tear on your departure, joy on your return, or a trusting hand in yours? Most of all, I am thankful for the tasks still left to do – for the adventure still lying ahead”  –

Sir Edmund Hilary

Lunch with Edmund Hilary at 760 metres at MT Cook /Aoraki

I may be with the statue of the great mountaineer, here, but as a young child, I was fortunate enough to have him visit our school,  shortly after his  successful assault on Mt Everest. Hilary was someone who contributed to many and various social projects in Nepal, and maintained close relationships with the country and the people, all throughout his life.  This is Nepal. It touches one’s soul, and one can never completely eradicate the desire to one day, return again.

I think Hilary’s words are profound and inspiring to a younger generation for whom the conquest of the world’s highest mountain is merely not if it will be done, but how many will succeed.

What do you make of his words?

Is the Navajo quote referring to something deeper or merely pretense?

Lunch with Edmund Hilary at 760 metres at MT Cook /AorakiThat is Something to Ponder About

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