Monday Mystery Photo – Last time Norway

Every second Monday, I post a photo of a ‘mystery’ location, and sometimes a mystery object. 

I invite you to leave a comment if you think you know the location, or what the mystery object might be.

 

This Week’s Monday Mystery Photo

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Can you guess the location?

If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog in a post the following Monday, when the answer is revealed.

Comments will be released later in the week, (Thursday Australian E.S.T.), so as not to spoil the fun for latecomers to this post.

The Mystery photo this week comes from Amy P from the Blog Tesserolo.  Many thanks to Amy for the use of her photo.

If you also have a travel photo you would like featured on Monday Mystery, please leave a comment or contact me on my email which you will find on the Contact page.

You can also find my email by hovering over my Gravatar and viewing my Profile information.

Last Time on Monday Mystery

Ted from recipereminiscing.wordpress.com has been a very welcome regular commenter on Monday Mystery, but his gorgeous photo comprised the very last MMP for 2017.

It was of course, the very famous Vigeland Sculpture park in Oslo, Norway.

  Thanks Ted for the photo!

This photo was taken on New Year’s Eve some years back, and strangely enough, both Ted and Myself were at the park on that very night!

Although we did not know of each other then!!! The snow fell right on midnight following the annual Fireworks display lighting up the sky.

A wonderful moment for a traveler in Norway!

Congratulations to Drake for correctly guessing the location.

Who will guess the location this time?

Something I do Ponder About

– Amanda

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WPC – Scale

 

The insignificance of man in the SCALE of things….

 

 

and our insignificance against animal and nature

 

The earth is so vast, yet sometimes feels so small.

It depends on the measurements on our scale.

 

Something to Ponder About

 

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Try some Traditional Art – Hallingdal Rosemaling

Hallingdal Rosemaling

Norwegian Rosemaling is the style of traditional painting now very popular in America, where it is a favoured style of interior decorating, especially amongst those folk with Scandinavian heritage. Each region, or ‘fylke’, in Norway, developed its own individual interpretation of traditional Rosemaling style and design, which initially appeared back in  the 18th century and even earlier.

Hallingdal style on a cupboard in Geilo

History of Rosemaling

In the 17th century, itinerant painters brought new ideas and artistic trends, from the cities of Europe, into the mountains and Valleys of rural Norway, painting Renaissance and Baroque motifs on the walls of the wooden Norwegian Stave churches. In the Hallingdal, Telemark and Vest Agder provinces, it was their relative geographic isolation that led to further development and evolution, of a peasant folk art form, into a highly distinctive and unique art.  Reaching its zenith in Norway during the 18th century, Rosemaling was then revived by the Norwegian peoples during a fiercely Nationalistic decorating movement in the 19th and 20th centuries, following the country’s political separation from Sweden. Following this, a similar resurgence in Norwegian traditional painting began amongst Norwegian immigrants, living in the American Midwest, in the mid to late 20th century, and this trend continues to flourish there today.

Read more here

Hallingdal style of Rosemaling

The Halling Valley, itself, is situated in an area of southern central Norway, covering towns such as Gol, Ål and Hol and this is where one finds many examples of Hallingdal Rosemaling, appreciated and loved, even today.

Elements of Halling style can be found in the Embroidery on the Norwegian women’s national costume, (called the Bunad), in Norwegian wood carving, on hanging cupboards, and on wooden objects around the Norwegian home.

Features of this Style:

  • Hallingdal Rosemaling colours: rich, varied, exuberant and strong
  • Background colours: red/orange-red, in later years, blue and green
  • Black appeared as a background colour following influences from Telemark
  • Flowers colours: – Blue, White, or Gold on Red grounds; Red and gold on blue/ green backgrounds
  • Early Hallingdal Rosemaling had more floral elements; scrolls were minor. Over time, scrolls became a frame around which the flowers were placed, in order to achieve a sense of balance, either side of the design’s vertical axis. Scrolls still maintained a simplistic form, with little or no shading, and were heavier than the lyrical scrolls seen in the Telemark area
  • Motifs: symmetrical in round/rectangular design shapes, often depicted in mirror image split along the vertical axis
  • Round floral patterns could also be segmented into 4, 6 or 8 divisions, typically with blossoms of four or more petals
  • Leaves: large, often surrounding a central flower,  or mirror image split vertically
  • Design elements are sometimes filled in with fine, cross – hatched lines.
  • Flower shapes of Hallingdal are classified into 3 groups: circles, triangles or half circles.
Claudine Schatz

Circle Flowers

  • A circular centre is painted first and then concentric bands of colour added
  • Petals are added around the central circle in an even number, four or more, with petal length limited by the sectional diameter of the circle, and defined with liner work.
  • Ball flowers are circular flowers painted as a series of round balls surrounding a centre circle.

Triangular Flowers

  • Simple flowers with three petals, similar to a tulip; usually painted in strokes from the outside tip down to a base at the centre.
  • Blooms with more than three petals can have an oval centre, similar to a daisy.  Are  also combined into more elaborate and complex floral designs.
  • Triangular flower petal strokes can double as leaf forms.

Half circle Flowers

  • Usually are seen as larger elements within the Hallingdal design.
  • Comprise a semi-circular band of colour around a base.
  • Adorned with over strokes and details that illuminate the flower in a new way.
  • Half circles can also become petals of a flower form.

Leaves

Two types are seen in Hallingdal Designs

  • Stroke – work leaves, similar to the triangle flower petals
  • Shaded leaves, which are large and heavy and used in conjunction with large round central flowers. They do have some liner work stems.

 

A design by Tore Christiansen

Scrolls

  • Scrolls may represent leaves, but take the form of C and S shapes.
  • They are not shaded or blended in Hallingdal designs.
  • Used as a frame around flowers or as a cartouche border in a band that circles a round floral motif.
  • Painted in one colour; the light source is indicated by over strokes of white/ lighter colour on the top side of the scroll.
  • Scrolls are quite tight. They are not airy and lyrical, as in pieces seen in Telemark regions

Hallingdal Rosemaling even had some features borrowed from Oriental art forms. It was although typical in many ways, also malleable to outside influences. These characteristics overlap and interlace with other Rosemaling styles, and as such, should not be used as limits or boundaries, in one’s own Rosemaling journey, but merely to establish guidelines when one is starting to study this beautiful art form.

Why not get a feel for Hallingdal Rosemaling by painting or colouring in this design:

Free project

Something to Ponder About

 

[Parts of the description of features of Hallingdal style was taken from Rosemaling in the Round by Pat Virch, 1976] 

 

 

Travel Theme – Behind

When I first read the post on Travel theme – Behind, I thought that I’d be hard pressed to find many photos to fit the theme. But then I realized rear facing photos can add another dimension to photography. Here is my list of tips on photography from behind.

My Ten Tips for Photography from Behind

  1. A shot taken from behind can set the tone and be made far more interesting. Some pensive brooding by my daughter, on the Great Ocean Road, Victoria, Australia.

Great ocean RoadWhat was she thinking? She hates road trips, so perhaps it was that, or maybe she was a little bored with the scenery? Surely not! Look at it!

 

2. Sometimes you can get an unexpected shot from behind!

[Take note, this one is for you, Peggy!!]

Rebel computer

3. Sometimes the best angle is found from behind! 

A Street entertainer in Brisbane, Australia.

street performer

4. The mood of a photo can be changed with a posterior shot!

Without the teen standing there, it might have been just another seascape. Instead, it became dramatic and I was concerned for the boy’s safety at at Ballina, Northern NSW.

cliff boy

 

5. A shot focusing behind can draw attention to where you want viewers to look.

Looking down the Floibanen, Bergen, Norway

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and direct the eye…

Copenhagen Town hall tower, Denmark

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6. Subjects don’t always need to be looking directly at the camera lens.

Sheep in Golfjellet, Norway

sheep in golfjellet

 

 

7. Sometimes the subject begs to be photographed from behind!

A garden ornament in Whitby, New Zealand

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8. The rear shot can be humorous, enhanced by nature, or man!

No, it wasn’t me who did this!  Vigeland Sculpture Park, Oslo

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9. The background behind can emphasize the message you are trying to convey

Art Exhibition by Ron Mueck

 Ron Mueck Exhibition

10. There is also the metaphorical meaning to one’s theme.

Art Exhibition by Ron Mueck

Ron Mueck Exhibition of Sculpture Art

Pondering about something behind one’s back?

 Something to Ponder About

 

Monday Mystery Photo – Last time Trondheim Grenadiers, Norway

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object. I invite you to leave a comment if you think you know the location or what it is. If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog, when the answer is revealed, the following Monday.

Guest Submissions are very welcome!

Please note that I will release comments in the latter part of each week, usually Thursday or Friday, Australia time, and in this way, everyone can have a guess without a spoiler being revealed prematurely.

This Week’s Monday Mystery Photograph

Snow the blogger from SnowmeltsSomewhere submitted this photograph shortly before she took a blogging break to have her baby.

Snowlpsomewheremmp

Can you guess in what country this staircase is located?

 

Previous Mystery Photo

The photo here under, of me, standing beside a soldier from a historical re-enactment group. The challenge was to find the location for this military group, based on his costume.

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This re-enactment group is actually based in Trondheim, Norway. In those days, the King of Norway was actually Prince Christian Frederik of Denmark, so this soldier wears the yellow faced uniform of the Trondheim Regiment, of Northern Grenadiers, in the Danish Norwegian Army fighting the Swedes in 1809 – 1814. Read more about the re-enactment groups here.

roros to trondheim mountain P1000789

Norwegian soldiers had been fighting the Swedes for many years. As many as 3000 Swedish soldiers died out in the mountains on the border of Sweden and Norway near Røros, during a bleak winter as they were retreating back home, defeated.

Here the group are parading in the Constitution Day parade in Trondheim with their drummers. They look rather grand, I think.

 

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Their hats are rather unusual, and remind me a little of a feather duster on a beaver’s back!! And there is my friend from the Monday Mystery photograph – in the middle of the photo!

trondheim soldater

The Winners:

It was a very difficult challenge and Ted from Recipe Reminiscing and Gerard from Oostermans Treats Blog were closest to the mark!  That was so clever of them both!

Good luck this week!

Monday Mystery

Something to Ponder About