Monday Mystery – Fredriksten Festning – Halden

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object. I encourage you to leave a comment if you think you might know where this week’s photograph, shown immediately below, is located. If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog when the answer will be revealed the following week. Guest submissions of MM photos are very welcome. Drop me an email if you would like to submit a photography to Monday Mystery Photo.

Last week we were in Fredriksten Festning, Norway, looking over the Swedish border! This fortress is situated high on the hill in Halden, and has an excellent vantage point for the Danish and Norwegian armies to warn of approaching invaders.

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Now I could say that Gerard, was correct, if I could call Norway and Sweden part of Northern Europe! But it was really Ted from Recipereminiscing, who recalled visiting the fortress at Halden, as a child, and it is he that guessed the correct answer. Excellent effort Ted! Perhaps Ted even climbed, (as my girl did), upon one of the relic cannons which still stands watch for the marauding Swedes!!

Here are some interesting historical facts:

Fredriksten dates from the 17th century and was named after King Frederik III of Denmark and Norway, (ruler at the time). It has seen many battles between the years of 1660 and 1814, mostly between the Norwegians and the Swedes, with the Norwegian Danish forces being triumphant. It seems Halden, must have been a thorn in the Swede’s side, as two of their King Charles’ have died there, the last shot in somewhat unusual circumstances. There was even a rumour it was a Swedish soldier that killed his commander, although this may have been by accident.

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Fredriksten Festning, Halden, Norway

Some interesting facts from http://www.spottinghistory.com:

Charles XII of Sweden attempted to take Frederiksten by storm on 4 July 1716. His troops took the town after fierce fighting, but the citizens set fire to their own houses, forcing Charles, unable to take the fortress, to retreat and await the arrival of heavy siege guns. Unfortunately for the invading army the entire Swedish transport fleet was captured or destroyed by the Norwegian naval hero Tordenskjold in Bohuslen. Running low on supplies, Charles retreated hastily across the Svinesund and burned the bridges behind him. In the Autumn of 1718 Charles once more attacked Norway, intending to first capture Halden to be able to sustain a siege of Akershus [Oslo]. The 1,400 strong garrison of Frederiksten fought ferociously to hold back the invasion…..the Swedish army intensified their efforts against the main fort. The Swedish trenches had almost reached the main fortification walls when on the evening of 11 December 1718, a bullet struck and killed [Swedish] Charles XII while he inspected the work. The death of the king effectively ended the attack on Fredriksten and the invasion was called off, leading to the conclusion of the war. A memorial is located in the park named in his memory where the Swedish king fell, just in front of the fortress.  The old fortress flag from 1814, taken by the Swedish troops and not returned to Norway until 1964, is preserved in the present day museum located inside the inner fortress.

Halden can be reached easily from Norway’s capital, Oslo by train and bus.

Thanks to all who commented on this and indeed for commenting on the Mmp’s, in 2017.

I hope I have given you something to ponder about!

MMP will be back in 2017.

Monday Mystery

 

 

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Spotlight on Traffic Lights – Traditional Art – July

This month the ‘ Traditional Art’ feature depicts a contemporary phenomenon that has quickly turned to an established tradition in modern, suburban Australia:

Decorated Traffic Signal Control Boxes

A boring, metal-grey ‘signal box’ that controls the traffic lights is just that – boring and sterile. Add a little imagination and a group of unemployed art students and a phenomenon  of community art is born.

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What is more, tenders for this community art project are called annually, by the municipal council authority. This has evolved to become a fantastic way for struggling artists to earn extra income, or, alternatively, for the councils to engage enthusiastic volunteers in the community.

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The variety of designs and local artistic ‘input’ is admirable.  A brightly coloured signal box, of course, is better visually and aesthetically, than the cold, grey metal box. One could even develop a collection of  photos documenting each box  to form a themed picture story of one’s travels!

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It might be a little distracting to drivers, when waiting for the traffic lights to change at an intersection, however, it chases away the boredom and keeps one from the temptation of checking the mobile phone!

Some  traffic box murals even tell a story pertinent to the street/area.

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Rosemaling traditional art

Traditional Art Forms – the diversity of themes of the new traditions is –

Something to Ponder About.

Black and White Sunday – Cape Gooseberry

Cape gooseberry

First fruit from my garden. It reminds me of being a child and playing in my Grandmother’s garden, where Gooseberry like this grew wild. The paper cases are a delight to pull apart and inside you will find a delicious berry.

Taken and adjusted slightly with Moldiv and the Nexus 4 Phone camera for Paula at Black and White Sunday

 

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Something to Ponder About

 

Phoneography and Non SLR Digital Photo Challenge – Black and White (Dalen)

The Nexus 4 is still pumping out some good quality photos – this one is just sharpened a little and converted to Monochrome: via Picasa.

I chose this photo due to  the contrast in the timber supports and posts and the trees, as well as the shadows on the verandah.

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Daily Dalen – Norway

She is definitely pondering something

Join in with Lens and Pens Weekly Phoneography challenges