Monday Mystery Photo – Last time Sicily

Every second Monday, I post a photo of a ‘mystery’ location, and sometimes a mystery object.  I invite you to leave a comment if you think you know the location, or what the mystery object might be.

If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog in the follow-up post, when the answer is revealed. Comments will be released on alternate Monday (Australian E.S.T.), so as not to spoil the fun for late-comers.

If you have a travel photo you would like featured on Monday Mystery, please leave a comment  below, or contact me by email, [find this at my Gravatar and Profile info].

 

The mystery photo this time comes from Lorelle from A Mindful Traveler.com. 

 

Lorelle 3

Where might this structure be located?

 


Previous Monday Mystery Photo

 

Lorelle2

 

The mystery photo last time was also kindly submitted by Lorelle from A Mindful Traveler.com.  Thank you, Lorelle, for your fantastic contribution!

The temple was not located in Greece, as some may have thought, but in Agrigento, on the South coast of Sicily, Italy and is known as the Temple of Concordia.

Apart from the Parthenon, it is the best preserved Doric temple in the world.

Mel and Suan from https://travelingmatters.net/ were not fooled and guessed the location correctly! Well done!

 

Monday Mystery

 

Best of luck to everyone with guessing the location of this week’s photograph.

 

 

 

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A and I Poetry Challenge #3 May

The A and I Poetry challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets.

The challenge runs March to October, 2018. 

Each month we will share tips, offer a monthly poetry prompt and post link backs to your published Poetry posts.

Please scroll down to see this month’s Prompt, guidelines, poetry writing tips and last month’s entrant links.

I am co-hosting this challenge with Ineke from Scrapydo Ineke and I met here on WordPress.If you wish to read the story of how we meet click here.

A and I Poetry Challenge

A and I Poetry Challenge Guidelines

  • For General instructions on joining in, click the Poetry Challenge Page.
  • Everyone is very welcome to enter and age is no barrier.
  • Write any kind of poem that you like, (the below prompt for this month, is merely a suggestion); it can be fun, or serious.
  • Write in any language that pleases you, and note that it certainly doesn’t have to be in English. As this is a joint challenge with Ineke, from Scrapydo2, note that she will also post the challenge in Afrikaans on her blog, so if that language suits you better, visit her here.
  • Add the A and I Poetry badge if you so wish. (optional)
  • Publish the poem on your blog before the 27th day of that month  adding the tag A and I Poetry Challenge to your post.
  • Once you publish your blog post, please leave a comment here on this page and also at Ineke’s blog, here, listing the URL link to YOUR poem.  [Others can then find their way to your  post and we build a supportive community of poets who visit, read and comment on other’s poetry.

**If you don’t post the link to our blogs with your poetry, it is really hard for us to find you and include a linkback to your blog, for the next month’s challenge.


 Poetry Challenge –  May Prompt

 

*Write a poem using this photograph or one of your own as inspiration.

 

N.B. If you choose to use your own photo, please post the photo along with the poem.

 

Here is my submission for this month:

Caught in the Bubble

Bubbles of air, glass and space,
Where’s the herd who grazed this place?

An artist form with eyes a-looking in.
Glass beads reflecting, seeing out, within.

A shrunken, perhaps yes, a distorted view,
Representing and offering a different hue.

Art is crazy, challenging, new,
Breaking barriers, often pushing taboos.

Take a peek and see much more,
Something’s looking back at you, for sure.

~ Amanda

I struggled with the subject matter for this poem, even though it was my own photo.

Apparently the Japanese creator wanted to accentuate the outer husk or shape of the animal by enhancing it with these beads of glass and acrylic.

A Word a Week Challenge - Glitter



Poetry Challenge Entrants for April:

 



Poetry Tips

  • Formatting – Tools to help you format your poems on your blog, including how to add extra lines in your post without WordPress expunging them on posting, can be found here
  • Live your poem. When you write, imagine you are a participant in your poem. Look around. See what’s happening. Feel the texture of the sticky pine cone. Feel how difficult it is to pull your fingers apart to type afterwards. Listen to the sounds around you. A robin? A whippoorwill? A Tasmanian devil? Smell your panic. Taste the dryness on your tongue, the thin salt. Activate all your senses. Galway Kinnell once said, “If you’re going to write about a frog, become that frog. Inhabit frogness.”
  • Don’t think too much, just write it down.
    Ray Bradbury once said, “Throw yourself off a cliff and build your wings on the way down.” Don’t think too much about what I’m going to write. Let the poem create itself. Discover what you are doing in the process of doing it. It evolves as you put pen to paper.
  •  Incorporate poetry devices
    What else can make your poetry shine like the summer sun? Imagery, metaphors, and symbolism-to name just a few poetry devices-are subtle ways to improve your poetry. By adding rhyme, irony, or tone to your work, you create a phoenix from a dead piece of paper.
    Readers enjoy poetry with meaning, that has a beat or an easy flow, and can be secretive but not beyond their understanding. Great poets know exactly how to incorporate the many elements of poetry into their work.
    Research the many poetry devices (others include simile, figurative language, synecdoche, allegories, and musical devices) and begin practicing with them in your own poetry. Write a poem with a theme you enjoy but base it around irony or a metaphor. Continue to practice each device and work them all into different poems to experience each one’s effect.
    You can find many examples and ways to use poetry devices by reading books on the subject or doing a simple search online. Study and learn each device, because you never know when one might work perfectly for what you are trying to write.

 

In a nutshell:

  1. Use poetry devices to give your work substance.
  2. Readers enjoy reading poetry with inner meaning or special attributes.
  3. It takes practice, hard work, and dedication to master devices like Symbolism, Imagery, or Rhyme.
  4. Finding out about each poetry device is easy; just search online or at your local bookstore or library.
[Source Credit: https://forum.rhymezone.com/articles/884-5-tips-for-writing-better-poetry-how-to-jumpstart-your-writing-by-john-bon%5D

 

I can’t wait to read what you come up with this month.

Don’t forget to link back to this post, on your poetry submission post, and leave a link and comment here so Ineke, Amanda and others can find your post.

Have fun!

~ Amanda and Ineke

 

Monday Mystery Photo – Last time Utah, USA

Every second Monday, I post a photo of a ‘mystery’ location, and sometimes a mystery object.  I invite you to leave a comment if you think you know the location, or what the mystery object might be.

If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog in the follow-up post, when the answer is revealed. Comments will be released on alternate Monday (Australian E.S.T.), so as not to spoil the fun for late-comers.

If you have a travel photo you would like featured on Monday Mystery, please leave a comment  below, or contact me by email, [find this at my Gravatar and Profile info].

Where might this incredible structure be located? Don’t be fooled!!

Lorelle2
This week’s Mystery Photograph

 

Last time, the Mystery Photo was submitted by Yinglan, who blogs at Another Story.

Thank you Yinglan for the photo. You set a great challenge for some of regular readers.

Here is last week’s photo from Yinglan:

DSC08494

Did you guess correctly?

I received a range of guesses including Dee, who proposed the location as Turkey, and Mosy who suggested Canada, but it was in fact,  Leggy Peggy and The Mindful Traveller Lorelle, who guessed the location correctly as USA. The strange rock formations are found in Bryce canyon National Park, in Utah. The area is also known for crimson-colored hoodoos, which are spire-shaped rock formations.

Best of luck with guessing the location of this week’s photograph.

Monday Mystery

MMP – Something to Ponder About

cropped-st-p-a.png

 

Amanda

 

 

Monday Mystery Photo- Last time Cambodia

Every second Monday, I post a photo of a ‘mystery’ location, and sometimes a mystery object.  I invite you to leave a comment if you think you know the location, or what the mystery object might be.

If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog in the follow-up post, when the answer is revealed. Comments will be released on alternate Monday (Australian E.S.T.), so as not to spoil the fun for late-comers.

The Mystery Photo this time comes from Yinglan, who blogs at Another Story.

Thank you Yinglan for the series of photos you sent in. Much appreciated.

Can you guess the location of the following photo, or a fact about the structure?

DSC08494

Previous Monday Mystery Photo – Cambodia

philipcambodia

 

Last time the mystery photo, seen above, originated from guest contributor Philip Duck whose blog, Cambodia Beginnings, can be found here.

Many thanks, for the kind use of the photo, Philip. It is much appreciated.

Philip tells us a little more about the structure here:

Wat (Pagoda) Sangke,

Battambang city, Battambang, Cambodia :

“Opposite the Wat is a park and the delightful Sangke river. Battambang is Cambodia’s third-largest city, but it’s a peaceful place with some beautiful French colonial architecture. Many consider Battambang rice to be the country’s best.”

Here are the winners for this round:-

Mel and Suan from Travelingmatters.net/  knew the temple itself by the four faces of Buddha
 Restlessjo  and Mosy thought it was very much like Angkor Wat and thus guessed Cambodia correctly.

Pooja  and Leggypeggy.com/  were also confident it was Cambodia

Can you guess as well this week?

 

Something to Ponder About

cropped-st-p-a.png

 

Raspberry Pie with Vanilla Sauce

raspberry

This recipe for Raspberry Pie with Vanilla Sauce comes from Pike at ArtKoppi

On my menu for this weekend. Have you cooked with rhubarb? If so, what did you make?

Easy and quick rhubarb pie

1 egg

3 dl sugar

3.5 dl cream milk

6 dl wheat flour

3 tsp baking powder

100 g of butter

1 l rhubarb (or raspberries or apples)

Beat the eggs and sugar in a mess. You can also choose to float the mixer. Add the cream of milk. Add the flour and baking powder. Finally, add the melted butter and stir. Spread the dough on a baking sheet on a baking tray and sprinkle over the rhubarb. Bake for about 1/2 hour at 200 degrees. Serve with vanilla sauce though. (Google translator)

I made it like this, but next time I would use more whole grain wheat and almond flour! And with ice cream it’s best, of course!

Vanilla sauce
(4 servings)

ingredients
3 dl milk
1 tablespoon of potato flour
2 tbsp sugar
1 egg yolk
2-3 tsp Vanilla Sugar

Measure the boiler cold milk, potato flour and sugar. Add the egg yolk and mix the ingredients properly. Remove pan from the stove and heat all the time still stirring, until the sauce thickens. Do not boil. Remove pan from heat and add vanilla. Cool the sauce between the whipping and providing.