blogging, Travel

Friendly Friday Challenge – Market

It is quite ironic that my Friendly Friday Challenge Co-host, Sandy, should give us the prompt, Market this week as I was just looking through my photos of the wonderful Market Hall, in Helsinki, Finland.

Finnish Markets

Where the Hungarians are spoilt for choice in varieties of Paprika in their markets, Helsinki is spoilt for choice in terms of Salmon.

Me, being Australian, have only really known three varieties of Smoked Salmon – Tasmanian, Norwegian and Danish Smoked Salmon.

My eyes opened as wide as saucers when I saw the contents of the cabinets in the Helsinki Markets, the day I arrived in the Finnish capital.

I remember it is not just ordinary salmon, because the thing that struck me about Finns, was that they had taken Salmon to a whole new level, like as in Heinz 52 different varieties.

Now I love Salmon, so I was pretty happy with this, until I realized how hard it would be be to choose which one to buy! I needed help to choose between Tsar’s salmon, Cold Smoked Salmon, Flamed Salmon, Lemon Salmon and Rose Pepper Salmon, etc. and in the end, feeling rather befuddled, I settled on Cured Salmon with Basilic. With a large helping of Salmon Soup? How could I resist?

salmon soup in helsinki
in helsinki

You need to know that the people of Helsinki eat a good deal of fish, freshwater fish, that is. Even sometimes three times in a day. So when I think of Helsinki, I think of Salmon, and lots of it.”

StPA – forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com/2016/09/17/helsinki-travel/

Polish Markets

In Poland, you may not see as much Salmon, but you will see a delicous form of smoked Sheep’s Cheese and lots of traditional style products for sale in Zakopane in the Tathra Mountains.

Zakopane

Japanese Markets

In Japan, the markets were absolutely full of many varieties of seafood. For the Japanese, seafood is a staple. It is a shame my travelling partner dislikes fish!

Australian Markets

Meanwhile back home in Australia, the sun is shining, (as always) and the markets continue with a Covid safe plan for the moment. For how much longer, we are unsure.

Redcliffe Esplanade
Pre Covid photo of Redcliffe Markets
Friendly Friday
History & Traditions, Motivational, Philosophy

Weekly Quote and Proverb

Proverbs and Quotes provide us with wisdom from days past.

These words, generally anonymous and uttered so succinctly, can teach us so much, in just a few words.

Here are this week offerings:

The greater love is a mother’s;

then comes a dog’s;

then a sweetheart’s – Polish Proverb

Schnauzer dog

In these times of pandemic and social distancing, we would do well to remember the Danish proverb:

No one is rich enough

to do

without a neighbour.

Danish Proverb
Dragør

As a second wave of Corona looks to be commencing in a southern state, the final word goes to Thomas Edison –

Stay safe.

poland
Travel

UNESCO World Heritage Sites – Gdansk Shipyards

We all know the slogan, “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas.” The exact opposite is true of Gdansk.

Their slogan is: ‘What happens here moves the world.’

solidarity gate-gdansk
The Solidarity Gate

The selfie is mine, but this iconic location belongs to the people of Gdansk, (until 1939, known as Danzig, Poland). This particular spot holds a significant place in history as the birthplace of a movement that changed the world.

People Power

Known to many people the world over, via their television sets, the gates to the Gdansk shipyards was where a group of disgruntled shipyard workers formed an illegal, freedom-oriented, trade union, named Solidarity.

Photo credit : inyourpocket.com

Not so significant in itself, you might think.

The Rise of Solidarity

Back in the 70’s and 80’s, this site was a hotbed of protest. The illegal Solidarity Union, led by the charismatic electrician, Lech Walesa, demanded the immediate adoption of (21) reforms to working conditions, including the right to strike and better wages, in total defiance of the Soviet regime and puppet Polish Government. Not only that – they went further demanding the abolition of censorship and the release of political prisoners. From there, Solidarity developed rapidly into a populist, political movement that gained support the world over, but never more so, than in Poland, itself.

The 21 Reforms at the Gates

It had been a sacking of a female crane operator, just months before her retirement, that initially galvanised Walesa and the workers to strike. Risking imprisonment and perhaps execution by the hardline authorities, these protests are considered to be a pivotal moment in history.

One that eventually triggered a reverse domino effect – the eventual collapse of the old Soviet political order in Eastern Europe and an end to Cold War hostilities.

The shipyards in Gdansk today

Lech Walesa

Rumour-mongers later discredited the motives behind Walesa’s actions, suggesting he had, at one time, co-operated with the Soviets when threatened with the loss of his job. However, the authenticity of these documents is disputed and may have been politically motivated, for, in 1989, Lech Walesa became the first President of the newly independent Poland and Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

He later retired from politics to lead a quieter life, living in a house that overlooks the same shipyards where he was began his activist journey.

Despite the negative claims, as a high school student in the 70’s whose head was filled with Marxist ideals, seeing Walesa and Solidarity protesting on the TV, was inspirational. Standing up for the powerless, Walesa became an instant hero of mine. Here was an underdog fighting against injustice, and moreover, against the biggest power in Eastern Europe. What guts!

Me in front of the 21 reforms

Walesa’s words maintain potency even today:

“We showed that the biggest problems should be solved at the negotiating table. They should be solved in an intelligent way… using argument rather than force. “

Lech Walesa

Right there – Lech had me on his side.

A Tribute to Workers

Tribute to the shipyard workers

An imposing monument to the fallen workers stands at the shipyard gates. It was a poignant moment reading thepoetic words I found engraved on one of the plaques. It carried a solemn warning:

You who have wronged a simple man…

Burst into laughter over his suffering…

DO NOT FEEL SAFE

Gdansk Shipyard Plaque

The Price of Freedom

For the Polish people, the new political order was both an incredibly exciting and an exceedingly difficult time. I learnt of a Grandmother, who had worked extremely hard for many years under Polish Soviet rule, saving to buy a house. When she had finally saved enough money and was close to her financial goal, independence from the old communist order arrived in Poland.

Unfortunately, along with economic independence came a massive devaluation of Polish currency and a huge financial shock. After independence, I was told the only thing the Polish Grandmother’s savings could buy was a pair of shoes!!

Can you imagine?

Such was the price of freedom!

UNESCO World Heritage

Together with the adjacent European Solidarity Centre – a museum documenting the workers’ struggles, the Gdansk Shipyard Gates are now a UNESCO World Heritage Site and have become a place of pilgrimage for intelligent, peaceful protest against oppression.

Ironicially, it is believed in some circles that some Poles think workers are not so much better off today, than they were under Soviet rule.

I will leave that for others to judge.

Photo Cred: inyourpocket

Inspired to Visit Gdansk?

Poland has duly honoured the contribution of Lech Walesa by naming the city’s Airport after him.

Lying 12 km Northwest of the city, Lech Walesa airport is well served by both budget and major airlines such as Ryanair, Lufthansa, Scandinavian Airlines and Polish LOT and is the gateway to beach resorts, such as Sopot and Gydnia on the Baltic Coast.

You can also arrive in Gdansk by Train and Bus from mainland Europe, or Ferries from Sweden.

A pilgrimage to the shipyards can be combined with a delightful day visiting the Old Town of Gdansk – where the 18th Century comes alives and more UNESCO sites await you.

But more of that next time, at Something to Ponder About.

Linked to Trent’s Coffee Share

Community, Motivational

For Richer and Poorer – Sunday Sayings

Polish Palace in Warsaw
Palace in Warsaw

Weekly Proverb

When I had money everyone called me brother

Polish proverb

metropolis people busy

“The gap between rich and poor is now at a level where Europe, at the time of the French revolution, looks positively socialistic by comparison:

~The three wealthiest people in the world today now own more than the poorest 48 nations combined!

~The top 1% owns more than half the total wealth of Earth.

We live in a world of scarcity, of needs and wants and unfulfilled dreams. And we, ourselves, are the ones who made it that way. https://northerndragon.blog/

wealthiest people in the world

  • Mark Zuckerberg. Net Worth: $61 Billion. …
  • Carlos Slim Helu. Net Worth: $61.7 Billion. …
  • Larry Ellison. Net Worth: $64.1 Billion. …
  • Amancio Ortega. Net Worth: $67 Billion. …
  • Warren Buffett. Net Worth: $82.7 Billion. …
  • Bernard Arnault. Net Worth: $83.7 Billion. …
  • Bill Gates. Net Worth: $98.3 Billion. …
  • Jeff Bezos. Net Worth: $145.3 Billion – CEO of Amazon

Do you feel that there is something fundamentally wrong here?

How is it possible to have this much wealth concentrated in just 8 names? It is beyond my comprehension what you might do with this much money. How does someone with this much wealth stays balanced? Do they see their money on only being ‘on paper?’

Would such enormous wealth corrupt you?

Wealth does not involve having many things, pointed out Jean-Jacques Rousseau, a Genevan philosopher in 1754, it involves having what we long for.

“Wealth is not absolute, it’s relative to desire. “

Jean-Jacques Rousseau

How much money do a person really desire, or need, over the course of any given year, in order to have what each might consider, a great life?

What would you do with such enormous wealth?

Weeklyquote

“Wealth is not about having a lot of money; it’s about having a lot of options.”

Chris Rock

Community

A Little Polish Never Goes Astray

My new years resolution is to learn a little of the Polish language. Why? Because the culture, food and language of Poland, has pretty much intrigued me as soon as I stepped off the plane in Krakow. But this post is not about Krakow, but rather, it is about somewhere a little further south – in the Tatra Mountains and a delightful walk I took through a town called Zakopane.

Rural Poland and the Tatra Mountain Ranges

It has been well over a year since I walked through Zakopane, in Poland. Yet the memory of that day still haunts me in the very best way. [And I am still learning Polish.]

Krupowki Street, Zakopane

Zakopane is a town in Southern Poland, about a two hour drive from Krakow, lying close to the Slovakian border, in the Tatra Mountain range. Communication between Zakopane and other towns was difficult for many years due to the mountainous terrain, and so the locals developed their own dialects, songs, architecture and traditions.

If you are a fan of gabled timber architecture, you’ll have come to the right place. Come and walk with me down the main street of Zakopane.

If you are too tired to walk, there is always a horse and wagon option that will take you to the Funicular station.

These beautiful horses wait for the chance to take you for a carriage ride

Cafes in Zakopane feature seating carved with traditional designs from Lower Silesia.

I found plenty of things to tempt me to open my purse in Zakopane and prices a pleasant surprise.

If you didn’t want trinkets, you can always try some of the delicious local foods from the many street vendors along the way. A specialty in this region is Sheep’s cheese.

If you have ever tasted Haloumi cheese, the Sheep’s cheese has a similar texture, but also a delicate smoky flavour. So very delicious. I could eat it every day if I could. Yum!

Norm’s Thursday Doors fans would appreciate the work in this door along Zakopane’s main street.

Walk through the door to gawk at the ornately decorated church, clearly loved by the community.

The interior of the church

Poised above the town of Zakopane is the summit of Gubałówka. This is my next stop.


That Yellow are in the photo below is the summit and we are going to get there in a mountain cable car. You can find the entrance to the funicular at the end of the main street.

Especially lovely in Summer, the summit lookout is frequented by skiers in winter as Zakopane is a hugely popular ski resort. Here I am enjoying the breathtaking view over the Zakopane Valley.



Time to explore more at the top of the mountain.

Can anyone read Polish? Is it 5 zloty to feed or pat the sheep?
Some traditional huts for smoking sheep’s cheese perhaps?
These bundles are so cute, they look like Cousin It from the Addams family.


The return cable car journey gave me a different perspective on the Zakopane valley.

Ready, Set, Here we go.

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Linking to Jo’s Wonderful Monday Walks

schnauzer animation
Community

Sunday Sayings

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned.

Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Under capitalism man exploits man;

under socialism the reverse is true.

~Polish proverb

The following quote comes from a rapper. Whilst there are few rap songs I like, these words filled me with a sense of hope – even for those who have lost it all.


“No matter how dirty your past is,

your future is still spotless.”


–Drake (Canadian rapper)

sunday sayings

Everyone’s opinion is important. What is yours?

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment.


Sunday Sayings are invariably Something to Ponder About

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Proverbial Friday – Wise Words for Life

Weekly Proverb

Krakow 20160623_203835

You can’t heal stubbornness

~ Polish Proverb

 

 

Does this proverb reflect something about the Polish culture itself, or might it have a wider resonance in our daily lives?

We might be stubborn about matters that are important to us, because we want to be on the winning side of an argument, that is not to say that we are fixated on winning for the sake of winning, but more so that we feel reassured that others think similarly to us). If so, then this might reflect some feelings of inferiority in our inner self.

Perhaps it might also be we are concrete thinkers about right and wrong?

On the other hand, could fighting for what you believe is right, be considered by some as also being stubborn, but in a positive sense?

 

 

Weekly Quotes

There is a big empasis on working collaboratively these days, especially in the workplace. The following quote seems to confirm that approach. however, where does that leave the individual prodigy? Like the Flying fox – out on a limb?

 

It is one of the most beautiful compensations of life that no man can sincerely try to help another without helping himself

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

three bats in a tree 20150812_120724

Shall we aim to help each other more!

 

Then there is this quote from Wolfgang von Goethe:

 

Some consider Wolfgang von Goethe’s quote, to be validation for positive criticism of a person or their ability. If you believe someone to be more capable than they outwardly demonstrate, can having another source, push you to lift your standards? Does it allow the person to see themselves from a different perspective?

 

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned.

Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

proverbial-thurs

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment.

Everyone’s opinion is important. What is yours?

Community

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdoms

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

Another Polish Proverb in the series is up for discussion this week.

troll

What reaches the mother’s heart will only reach the father’s knees

~ Polish Proverb

Pol Torun 20160629_124751

This Week’s Quote

Continuing on with the theme of remaining grateful and positive, it sounds like Oprah Winfrey has also discovered this key to finding contentment.

“Be thankful for what you have; you’ll end up having more.

If you concentrate on what you don’t have, you will never, ever have enough.”

–Oprah Winfrey

I find the Polish proverb a little intriguing. Could it refer to the warm, nourishing nature of Mothers, and by contrast, the disciplinarian, less emotional style of parenting by some fathers? Or is that too simplistically gender specific? I don’t have a time frame to give this proverb a historical context, however I suspect it comes from an age long gone.

What explanation can you make of it?

Oprah clearly has much to be thankful for, but it is refreshing to hear a celebrity that is not so fixated on wealth or hungry for more.  What do you think?

Something Proverbial to Ponder About

River boats art
Community

Proverbial Friday – Global Words

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

 

 

Weekly Proverb

 

Continuing with our present series of Polish Proverbs, we have this unusual piece of advice:

 

‘​Watch the faces of those who bow low’

Polish Proverb

Vigeland

 

What could this proverb be warning us about? Betrayal, Deceit?

What do you think?

Is it a proverb that is familiar to you?

 

 

Weekly Quote

 

This week, we have the following quote, which appears to relate to inciting motivation?

Do you agree?

someday is not a day of the week1852628217..jpg

 

Would Janet’s quote motivate you?

How do you find motivation when you are not really feeling it?

I invite you to leave a comment and join in the discussion.

 

proverbial friday1152137091..jpg

 

 

Proverbial Friday giving you something motivational to ponder about

~ Amanda

 

St P A

 

Community

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

 

 

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

malcsine cafe

 

 

One hand washes the other – Polish Proverb

 

 

What do you think this old proverb refers to?

That we should help those who are of our ilk, our neighbours, our community? Or does it refer to a mutually beneficial partnership, similar to “If you scratch my back, I will scratch yours?”

Perhaps it refers to being self reliant?  Naturally helping oneself?

Could it be a spurious saying to motivate those who tend to be lazy?

 

 

Criminals usually prey on weakness. They can smell it. ~ Steven Seagal

 

Can they indeed?

It has been suggested that some criminals are extremely intelligent, but choose to use their intelligence for nefarious purposes. These unscrupulous types take advantage of perceived weaknesses. Profiling seems to suggest that certain criminals have an instinct for selecting their victims? Could Steven Seagal be referring to this sense?

pexels-photo.jpg

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment as to what these proverbs, saying or quotes mean to you. Have you heard them said before? In what context.

I would love to hear your thoughts.

proverbial-thurs

 

Proverbial Friday

St P A

Now posting every Friday – Always Something to Ponder About

 

folk art eggs
Community

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures.

They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

 

The proverb this week comes from Poland.

 

Christchurch Cathedral Square

 

 

In a game it’s difficult to know when to stop. ~ Polish Proverb

 

I do believe that there is another layer to the Polish quote. But what is it?

The game of Life? 

Does it refer to our competitive natures? Or the overwhelming desire to win?

 

If indeed that proverb relates to competition, we would do well to remember this saying –

 

“I don’t measure a man’s success by how high he climbs but how high he bounces when he hits bottom.” ~ George S. Patton

 

 

U.S. Army General George Patton earned the nickname Old Blood and Guts and served in both World Wars, so perhaps he had incisive terms of reference, for his quote. 

Do you believe we have an innate ability to spring back from rock bottom, often called in contemporary times: resilience, or, can it be learned through education? 

I would love to hear your thoughts. Join in the discussion by leaving a comment below.

 

 

 

Blog

Now posting on Fridays

Indeed this is something for us to ponder about

~Amanda

 

Community

Monday Mystery Photo – Last time Poland

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object.

I invite you to leave a comment, if you think you know the location, or what it is. If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog when the answer is revealed, the following Monday.

Guest Submissions are very welcome! You can find my Email at my Gravatar if you have a photo you would like to submit.

This week’s photo comes from Hanne Sieber’s collection, and you can find her blog here.

Thanks so much for your guest submission, Hanne. What a great photo!

This week’s Mystery Photo


Last Week’s Mystery Photo – seen below

MMp 17

The selfie was mine, but the iconic location it seems, was known to many people, and not just for its unusual structures, but also because of its significant history. I am standing at the shipyards in Gdansk,at a place where, in 1980, ordinary workers stood up to a powerful nation on earth; they defied the iron fist of the Soviet Union, destroying the Iron Curtain in Eastern Europe. It was here that people power formed a union called Solidarity, led by an electrician, named Lech Walesa. As a student of modern History, Walesa was a hero of mine, and although he did become President of the new independent Poland, he later retired from politics to a quieter life, and still lives in a house overlooking the shipyards, today. Here is a link to more of his story:

“>

This was an incredibly exciting and difficult era in time. I was told of a Grandmother, who had worked and saved hard, for years upon years in order to buy a house, and when she had saved almost enough money, independence from the old Soviet order came to Poland. But with economic independence, came the financial shock that the only thing her savings could now buy, was one pair of shoes!! Soul destroying? Such was the price of freedom!

Here are the list of bloggers who correctly identified the country/location:-

Yvette from Priorhouse Blog

Pooja from Stories from Europe

Mel and Suan from Traveling Matters to Us

TidiousTed From Recipe Reminiscing

Gerard from Oosterman Treats

Drake from ledrakenoir

Dina from The World According to Dina

Leggy Peggy

Polish Revolution – Something sobering and inspirational to Ponder About

Monday Mystery

Community

Monday Mystery Photo. Last week Wroclaw, Poland

This Week’s Mystery Photograph

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object. I invite you to leave a comment if you think you know the location of this week’s photograph. If you guess the correct location, I will link back to your blog when the answer is revealed the following Monday.*

*Please note that I will release comments in the latter part of each week, usually Thursday or Friday and in this way, everyone can have a guess without a spoiler being revealed in the comments.

Last week’s Monday Mystery Photograph

wp-image-613385071

Last week we were in Wroclaw, (pronounced more like Vratslav), in Silesia, Poland checking out – “The Anonymous Pedestrians.”

I have to say I found this incredibly powerful piece of street art. Sources state that the statues are representative of all the people working, for so many years, in the Polish underground movements. As Poland has struggled for centuries with self-determination, it has a poignant theme and spans many generations of untold struggle, heroism and resilience. A really significant piece of Polish art, worth seeing, if you ever have the pleasure of visiting Poland.

“The wonderfully lifelike bronze statues descending into the earth are based on Jerzy Kalina’s temporary art installation set up in Warsaw in 1977; the original plaster sculptures, stored in the Wrocław National Museum for 28 years, were re-cast in bronze and unveiled in the middle of the night on the 24th anniversary of the introduction of martial law in Poland.” [Source: inyourpocket,com]

Wroclaw has much more to offer and I personally loved the city. The old town and surrounds are very special. Intrigued? Read more about it here

The following bloggers guessed last week’s photograph location correctly:

trophy-cup-and-ribbon

Stories from Europe – Well done, Pooja

Where to Next? – Great memory, Peggy

A Mindful Traveller – Excellent guess, Lorelle

Ledrakenoir – I should know your url off by heart now, Drake

Travelling Matters to Us  – Great work, Mel and Suan

Very impressive general knowledge!

Monday Mystery

Something to Ponder About this Monday