Monday Mystery Photo – Last time Poland

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object.

I invite you to leave a comment, if you think you know the location, or what it is. If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog when the answer is revealed, the following Monday.

Guest Submissions are very welcome! You can find my Email at my Gravatar if you have a photo you would like to submit.

This week’s photo comes from Hanne Sieber’s collection, and you can find her blog here.

Thanks so much for your guest submission, Hanne. What a great photo!

 

This week’s Mystery Photo

Dina lighthouse
Can you guess the Mystery location?

Last Week’s Mystery Photo – seen below

MMp 17

The selfie was mine, but the iconic location it seems, was known to many people, and not just for its unusual structures, but also because of its significant history. I am standing at the shipyards in Gdansk,at a place where, in 1980, ordinary workers stood up to a powerful nation on earth; they defied the iron fist of the Soviet Union, destroying the Iron Curtain in Eastern Europe. It was here that people power formed a union called Solidarity, led by an electrician, named Lech Walesa. As a student of modern History, Walesa was a hero of mine, and although he did become President of the new independent Poland, he later retired from politics to a quieter life, and still lives in a house overlooking the shipyards, today. Here is a link to more of his story:

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This was an incredibly exciting and difficult era in time. I was told of a Grandmother, who had worked and saved hard, for years upon years in order to buy a house, and when she had saved almost enough money, independence from the old Soviet order came to Poland. But with economic independence, came the financial shock that the only thing her savings could now buy, was one pair of shoes!! Soul destroying? Such was the price of freedom!

Here are the list of bloggers who correctly identified the country/location:-

Yvette from Priorhouse Blog

Pooja from Stories from Europe

Mel and Suan from Traveling Matters to Us

TidiousTed From Recipe Reminiscing

Gerard from Oosterman Treats

Drake from ledrakenoir

Dina from The World According to Dina

Leggy Peggy

Polish Revolution – Something sobering and inspirational to Ponder About

Monday Mystery

 

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Monday Mystery Photo. Last week Wroclaw, Poland

This Week’s Mystery Photograph

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object. I invite you to leave a comment if you think you know the location of this week’s photograph. If you guess the correct location, I will link back to your blog when the answer is revealed the following Monday.*

mmp july17
Where is this structure located?

*Please note that I will release comments in the latter part of each week, usually Thursday or Friday and in this way, everyone can have a guess without a spoiler being revealed in the comments.

Last week’s Monday Mystery Photograph

 

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Last week we were in Wroclaw, (pronounced more like Vratslav), in Silesia, Poland checking out – “The Anonymous Pedestrians.”

I have to say I found this incredibly powerful piece of street art. Sources state that the statues are representative of all the people working, for so many years, in the Polish underground movements. As Poland has struggled for centuries with self-determination, it has a poignant theme and spans many generations of untold struggle, heroism and resilience. A really significant piece of Polish art, worth seeing, if you ever have the pleasure of visiting Poland.

“The wonderfully lifelike bronze statues descending into the earth are based on Jerzy Kalina’s temporary art installation set up in Warsaw in 1977; the original plaster sculptures, stored in the Wrocław National Museum for 28 years, were re-cast in bronze and unveiled in the middle of the night on the 24th anniversary of the introduction of martial law in Poland.” [Source: inyourpocket,com]

Wroclaw has much more to offer and I personally loved the city. The old town and surrounds are very special. Intrigued? Read more about it here

The following bloggers guessed last week’s photograph location correctly:

trophy-cup-and-ribbon

Stories from Europe – Well done, Pooja

Where to Next? – Great memory, Peggy

A Mindful Traveller – Excellent guess, Lorelle

Ledrakenoir – I should know your url off by heart now, Drake

Travelling Matters to Us  – Great work, Mel and Suan

 

Very impressive general knowledge!

Monday Mystery

Something to Ponder About this Monday

Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge: Travel

I have followed Sally’s blog for some time and her regular weekly feature with changing themes gives photography buffs a good array of choice and inspires creativity. I am thrilled to have a chance to blog some of my favourite travel photographs in her Challenger’s choice week.

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A perfect day on the river!

Sally D’s Mobile Photography Challenge

20160623_204028-k A Great spot for lunch!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A world like no other!

Joyously or not the photograph becomes the source of reality, but it can also become a dreamlike force for interpretation. So if photography is memory, then the image is the moment–a moment of sanctuary in a lifetime of them. [Source: Sally D]

Even when I am so old I can no longer travel, I will have my photos and memories to ponder about.

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Monday Mystery Photo – Last week The Netherlands

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object. I encourage you to leave a comment if you think you might know where this week’s mystery photograph, shown immediately below, is located, or what it is. If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog the following week when the answer will be revealed.

Drop me an email if you would like to submit a photography to Monday Mystery Photo. Guest submissions of MM photos are very welcome.

mmpoct16What town are we overlooking in the above photo?  And if that is too easy, what structure is the photo taken from?

Last time, on Monday Mystery Photo, we were in The Netherlands, in Delft’s Markt square, at the City Hall, a beautiful Renaissance style building, seen below.

City hall Delft
Delft City hall

It is the former seat of the city’s government, and still today the place where residents hold their civic wedding ceremonies. Originally designed by the Dutch architect Hendrick de Keyser, it was heavily changed over the centuries and was restored in the 20th century to its Renaissance appearance. [Source: https://www.virtualtourist.com/462233-2221601/Delft-Tips/city-hall%5D

The following bloggers guessed correctly! Well done!

Ted from Recipe reminiscing

Pooja from Stories from Europe

Drake from LeDrakeNoir

The above – mentioned bloggers Pondered About the photograph. Enough to accurately guess its location. Will they do it again this week?

Monday Mystery

 

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Bigos – A Polish Hunter’s Meal

Polish food
Polish food
Bigos

Do you live in the Northern half of the world? If so, I am thinking you might be preparing for the onslaught of cooler weather. Me, I’ve just finished with all that for a while; in the southern hemisphere it is all about getting the pool toys out of storage and readying the garden for the long, hot summer. It was during our short winter season that I recreated a taste that I had brought back home with me, when I returned from Poland: the Polish national dish, called “Bigos.”

Bigos is a meal based on the Polish sausage, Kielbasa, but any kind of cooked sausage works well if you make your own version. It might be nice to try Chorizo sausage, but I actually used Bratwurst, as that is what I had to hand. It is still a traditional Bigos no matter what meal you use, as Wikipedia states:

“The variety of meats is considered essential for good bigos; its preparation may be a good occasion to clean out one’s freezer and use up leftovers from other meat dishes.”

Making Bigos is a great use of leftovers, especially sausage and cabbage, because unless you like curried sausages, which my other half most decidedly doesn’t, you aren’t left with too many other options with using up leftover bratwurst.

But Bigos IS an option you do have. And what’s more, it’s a very forgiving dish. Being a traditional dish of not only Poland, but also Belarus and Lithuania, it is said that there are as many recipes for Bigos, as there are cooks in Poland!

Traditionally, Bigos would be served at large family gatherings, like Christmas or Easter, but centuries ago, it was more common to cook Bigos in a simply pot over a camp fire, whilst out, “hunting,” hence the term, “Hunter’s Stew.”

Source: Wikipedia
Source: Wikipedia

Like many stews or casseroles, it has a flavour that improves with subsequent reheating and refrigeration. One can vary the amount of sauerkraut/fresh cabbage and meat ratios used and thicken it with several ingredients such as flour, crumbled rye bread, or even grated raw potato. In Silesian Poland, they add a potato dumpling to thicken the stew prior to serving. [Note to self: I must try that next time!]

This very forgiving flexible, hearty dish is just the ticket for an upcoming cool Autumn/Winter night. It could also be easily made in the slow cooker, ready and waiting for when one arrives home from work, in the evening!

Originally, this recipe came from Allrecipes.com, but I have varied it a great deal and so have reproduced it here.

POLISH BIGOS

Ingredients

  • 2 thick slices hickory-smoked bacon
  • 1 large cooked bratwurst, kielbasa other Polish sausage, sliced
  • 250g cubed pork/ham
  • 1-2 cloves garlic, diced
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 2 sticks celery, sliced
  • 2 carrots, diced  or other hard vegetables
  • 1 cups sliced fresh mushrooms
  • 2 cups thinly sliced cabbage – any variety is fine
  • 250g sauerkraut, rinsed and well drained
  • 1/4 cup (60ml) dry red wine- I didn’t have any so I left this out
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1 teaspoon dried marjoram
  • 2 teaspoon paprika
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 pinch caraway seed, crushed
  • 1 pinch cayenne pepper
  • 50g mushrooms,  diced
  • 1 dash hot chilli sauce (optional)
  • 1 dash Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 cups beef/chicken stock
  • 1 tablespoons tinned tomato paste
  • 2/3 cup tinned diced tomatoes

Method

  1.  Add the bacon and kielbasa/bratwurst sausage to a large saucepan on medium heat. Cook and stir until the bacon, sausage, pork or ham is lightly browned.
  2. Add the garlic, onion, celery, and saute for several minutes.
  3. Add carrots, mushrooms, cabbage and sauerkraut. Reduce heat to medium, then cook and stir until the carrots are soft; about 10 minutes. Do not let the vegetables brown.
  4. Add the red wine and heat, stirring to loosen all of the bits that are stuck to the bottom. I used a little stock as I had no wine!
  5. Season with the bay leaf, the herbs, paprika, salt, pepper, caraway seeds and cayenne pepper; cook for 1 minute.
  6. Mix in the mushrooms, chili sauce if you wish, Worcestershire sauce, remaining chicken or beef stock, tomato paste and tomatoes. Heat through just until boiling. Cover with a lid.
  7. Simmer on the stove for 1 1/2 hours or Bake in the preheated oven for 2 1/2 to 3 hours or on low/auto in a slow cooker.
  8. I omitted the use of flour, but if the Bigos has not condensed down to the consistency of a casserole, add 1 -2 tablespoon of cornflour mixed in a little cold water and mix in. Cook for 5- 10 minutes till thickened.

Easy to cook, traditional meals are really worth pondering about during winter.

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