Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdom

fjord

proverbial-thurs

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, these global words of advice come to us from past generations and from across cultures.

They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb, or Saying, and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.

I hope you think so too.

43f934a8-a249-4dc1-94da-9c709278013e

Continue reading “Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdom”

Advertisements

Proverbial Thursday – Wisdom for All

Proverbial sml

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Valuable life lessons.  Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

So, with that in mind, each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying, and a Quote from different cultures and parts of the world, that I have found thought-provoking. I hope you think so too. I invite you to comment on your thoughts behind the meaning of these, often enigmatic, words.

You are very welcome to join in the discussion!

You can find previous Proverbial Thursday Quotes here – some of the discussions are fascinating.

 

 

IMG_6429

 

 

Endurance produces character, and character produces hope – Unknown

 

 

outdoors_n

 

As the day draws to a close, I am feeling a bit exhausted, so this quote found relevance in my life:

Finish every day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities crept in. Forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day; you should begin it serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism, freedom, the ability for humankind to realize almost anything, and the relationship between the soul and the surrounding world. Emerson’s “nature” was more philosophical than naturalistic: “Philosophically considered, the universe is composed of Nature and the Soul”.

 

Waldo Emerson is also well-known as a mentor and friend of Henry David Thoreau, a fellow transcendentalist, whose quote were showcased here.

Discussion:

It is a shame that we aren’t able to credit the proverb with any particular person. To me, this means it is sage-ful advice gleaned from many disappointments and sorrow. There is a positive we can draw from adversity. Hope is so important in our sometimes troubled lives. For some, hope is all they have.

 

Has keeping ‘Hope’ alive, helped you through some tough times?

Is it too difficult to put Emerson’s quote into practice? I would love to hear your thoughts.

Something Inspirational to Ponder About

Save

Proverbial Thursday – Global Words of Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Valuable life lessons.  Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

So, with that in mind, each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying, and a Quote from different cultures and parts of the world, that I have found thought-provoking. I hope you think so too. I invite you to comment on your thoughts behind the meaning of these, often enigmatic, words.

You are very welcome to join in the discussion!

You can find previous Proverbial Thursday Quotes here – some of the discussions are fascinating.

city hall stockholm

In calm water, every ship has a good captain ~

Swedish Proverb

VAsa Museum

Although the proverb’s words did not help the ship:’Vasa’ on its maiden voyage, from Stockholm, in 1628! Read more about visiting Stockholm and what happened to the King’s ship here.

images

The quote I have chosen this week, does not necessarily apply only to school students, but also to workers, and all who interact with others, or reside in a community. The student’s  words struck me as profound, especially for someone with much of her life ahead of her.

“It wasn’t the friendship, fights and drifts that broke us; it was if we allowed that to fester into deep grudges and acts of revenge.  It wasn’t completing the assessment pieces that made us; it was feeling stressed or so over them after Term 1 and yet repeating that process in Term 2, then Term 3, then Term 4.  And it wasn’t the embarrassment or judgment from people that broke us; it was whether we allowed that to shatter our confidence and self-belief.”

J Tinn – School Student 2016

The student’s words made me think it is not the misfortune or good news in itself, that affects our mood, it is how we perceive the words relative to our own sphere, how we individually interpret, accept or reject the words; how much we let the words get under our skin, or soak them up; how much we react to the words and what that reaction looks like. We can choose whether the words help or hinder us.

pulling out hair

Is this true? We always have a personal, inner choice on how we react, even when there seems no other option? I believe so.  For whilst we cannot control what others might or might not do, we can always control how we act and – react. Do you agree?

yukkyfood

And do you think the Swedish proverb has any relevance in today’s world or is it applicable only, to times gone by?

proverbial-thurs

Something to Ponder About

Save

Proverbial Thursday – Global words of Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too.

vikingboat-parade

The proverb this week comes presumably as far back as Viking times when woman used to wear their keys on belts around their waist.

Not all keys hang from one girdle –

Norwegian  Proverb

and a quote from  Henry David Thoreau, ( American essayist, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, and historian)

Bananas, Ballina, Beach, Bangalow and The Big Scrub

“Many men go fishing all their lives without knowing that is it not fish they are after.”

Comment: Thoreau appears to be thumbing his nose at those who appear blind in the metaphorical sense. Is he referring to those who bury themselves in work only to lament their all too brief time with family, upon their death bed or in infirmed retirement?

What is your interpretation of his words?

Henry David Thoreau anticipated the methods and findings of ecology and environmental history, two sources of modern-day environmentalism. His literary style interweaves close observation of nature, personal experience, pointed rhetoric, symbolic meanings, and historical lore, while displaying a poetic sensibility, philosophical austerity, and Yankee attention to practical detail.  He was also deeply interested in the idea of survival in the face of hostile elements, historical change, and natural decay; at the same time he advocated abandoning waste and illusion in order to discover life’s true essential needs.[Source:Wikipedia] and his sympathies for anarchy are summed up with his words:

“That government is best which governs not at all; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have.”

I doubt that this sort of government appears likely or even practical as there needs to be some leadership, some central entity. I don’t feel that anarchy is even desirable. Every ship needs a captain. In Australian politics, one government leader attempted to  govern by consensus, which whilst admirable in terms of equity, did not serve the country nor the people well in practice.

What do you make of the proverb? And Thoreau’s warning on society and life? Is anarchy a tenable option in any way?

proverbial-thurs

Something to Ponder About

Proverbial Thursday – Global Words of Wisdom

Aoraki

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too.

proverbial-thurs

You can’t wake a person who is pretending to be asleep –

Navajo Proverb

“And this is what really counts, not just achieving things, but the advantage you have taken of your opportunities and the opportunities you created. Each of us has to discover his own path, of that I am sure. Some paths will be spectacular and other peaceful and quiet and who is to say which is the most important? For me the most rewarding moments have not always been the great moments, for what can surpass a tear on your departure, joy on your return, or a trusting hand in yours? Most of all, I am thankful for the tasks still left to do – for the adventure still lying ahead”  –

Sir Edmund Hilary

Lunch with Edmund Hilary at 760 metres at MT Cook /Aoraki

I may be with the statue of the great mountaineer, here, but as a young child, I was fortunate enough to have him visit our school,  shortly after his  successful assault on Mt Everest. Hilary was someone who contributed to many and various social projects in Nepal, and maintained close relationships with the country and the people, all throughout his life.  This is Nepal. It touches one’s soul, and one can never completely eradicate the desire to one day, return again.

I think Hilary’s words are profound and inspiring to a younger generation for whom the conquest of the world’s highest mountain is merely not if it will be done, but how many will succeed.

What do you make of his words?

Is the Navajo quote referring to something deeper or merely pretense?

Lunch with Edmund Hilary at 760 metres at MT Cook /AorakiThat is Something to Ponder About

Save