blogging, Environment

Friendly Friday Blogging Challenge – Something Different

Friendly Friday Blogging Challenge

Sandy set a Friendly Friday challenge to come up with Something different and I was convinced I’d failed to find anything noteworthy until I read Ally Bean’s Rudolph Framework which she’s adapted from a marketing analysis by author Ann Handley.

reindeer encased in glass bubbles art
Not ‘Rudolph’ but quirky namesake

The Rudolph Marketing Framework

The Rudolph Framework “helps you understand the actual problem you and your business solve for your customers– not the one you *think* you solve.” Click HERE to be taken to her fun explanation of this framework.

thespectacledbean.com/2021/02/23/applying-a-business-framework-to-this-personal-blog-to-tell-a-tale/

Most know, or will quickly find out, I am no blog business guru and to be frank, StPA is purely self-expression via my own mindful meanderings covering a multitude of topics from the environment to photography.

Therefore, you might, as I initially did, think this Rudolph exercise holds little relevance in the blogging world and is akin to writing one of those verbose, but glib ‘mission statements.’ [Groan]

Photo by Christina Morillo on Pexels.com

Those two words, ‘mission statement,’ is enough for me to tune out and yet, reading further, I quickly realized that I did want to know where I might be headed blog-wise, and that a little blogging self-examination may indeed be useful, at least to me. Add to that, Ally mentioned that she was curious to see where the framework would take other bloggers. Thus, I’d dive right in. I may have taken it in a tangent way off the original intention, but it IS an experiment so who knows where we will end up.

Following are the Framework questions. One fills in the blanks for how it pertains to your blog. Like one of those grammar exercises back in school. Easy, right?

Something to Ponder About Blog’s Rudolph Framework

  1. Once upon a time, there was a blog focused on information important enough to share with others that promoted open, independent discussion called Something to Ponder About.
  2. It has the capacity to question, to inform, to frustrate and possibly to validate aspects of environmental change, in addition to various other topics.
  3. Some people doubt it because they’re sure technology will be the saviour in any environmental disaster and the blogosphere is merely filled with rank amateurs who not only ignore contradictory information and opinions, but seem hell-bent on locking up the planet, subverting business progress or fixate on their own capitalistic endeavours. [which is incorrect].
  4. But one day, the earth shouts at ALL its people so loudly that heads turn and deaf ears and closed eyes open.
  5. Which means that more folks become interested in environmental change and start to connect with bloggers and others who recognize we all live on one heavenly body.
  6. To help the awareness of planetary health and survival for all sentient beings.
  7. And that matters because the global population needs access to independent information and different opinions, from many diverse sources which results in an informed global community, who might be more proactive about positive change, mindful of equity and respectful of differences.
  8. In the process, you help coalesce a community of global cohesiveness and egalitarian understanding with blogs being one small catalyst.
  9. The Planet gets a kiss!

Applying the Rudolph Framework to Your Own Blog

If you wish to try this writing experiment with your own blog, check in with Ally. Blogger etiquette would suggest you cite Ann Handley and include a pingback to The Spectacled Bean.

reflecion in glass ball
Something Different

If you wish to join in with the Friendly Friday Challenge, check the instructions, or visit Sandy’s Friendly Friday post.

I will be back with another Friendly Friday challenge theme on Friday 12th March, 2021.

Amanda

stpa logo
Community

Poetry Writing Tips and May Challenge

Poetry Writing Tips included below:-

Time is almost up for posting poems for the A and I Poetry Challenge for the month of  May. Have you written your poem, yet?

Post a poem with a linkback to my blog and Ineke’s before the 28th May, so I can easily find it and include it in the next monthly Poetry Challenge post.

 Poetry Challenge –  May Prompt

*Write a poem using this photograph or one of your own as inspiration.

 

N.B. If you choose to use your own photo, please post the photo along with the poem.

 

You will find the full post on the May prompt and guidelines here

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

Poetry Writing Tips

I will discuss more about using concrete language in poetry next month but here is a taste to get you thinking and writing in a more concrete way.

Tip: Use concrete language instead of abstract language

The key to writing great poetry is to write focused, concrete poetry. But many beginning poets write poetry based around wide themes such as love, life, and anger, generalizing their writing.

By using strong language, active verbs instead of passive verbs and concrete language instead of abstract, you can capture a reader’s interest and captivate a reader’s imagination. Poetry, as something others read, should be at its best interactive, and at its worse, straight forward and clear.

Here is an example:

Abstract vs concrete Example 1

 

Concrete words describe things that people experience with their senses.

  • orange
  • warm
  • cat

A person can see orange, feel warm, or hear a cat.

Poets use concrete words help the reader get a “picture” of what the poem is talking about. When the reader has a “picture” of what the poem is talking about, he/she can better understand what the poet is talking about.

Abstract words refer to concepts or feelings.

  • liberty
  • happy
  • love

“Liberty” is a concept, “happy” is a feeling, and no one can agree on whether “love” is a feeling, a concept or an action.

A person can’t see, touch, or taste any of these things. As a result, when used in poetry, these words might simply fly over the reader’s head, without triggering any sensory response. Further, “liberty,” “happy,” and “love” can mean different things to different people. Therefore, if the poet uses such a word, the reader may take a different meaning from it than the poet intended.

Change Abstract Words Into Concrete Words

To avoid problems caused by using abstract words, use concrete words.

Example: “She felt happy.”

This line uses the abstract word “happy.” To improve this line, change the abstract word to a concrete image. One way to achieve this is to think of an object or a scene that evokes feelings of happiness to represent the happy feeling.

Improvement: “Her smile spread like red tint on ripening tomatoes.”

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

Writing poetry is something to ponder about

Community

A and I Poetry Challenge #3 May

The A and I Poetry challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets.

The challenge runs March to October, 2018. 

Each month we will share tips, offer a monthly poetry prompt and post link backs to your published Poetry posts.

Please scroll down to see this month’s Prompt, guidelines, poetry writing tips and last month’s entrant links.

I am co-hosting this challenge with Ineke from Scrapydo Ineke and I met here on WordPress.If you wish to read the story of how we meet click here.

A and I Poetry Challenge

A and I Poetry Challenge Guidelines

  • For General instructions on joining in, click the Poetry Challenge Page.
  • Everyone is very welcome to enter and age is no barrier.
  • Write any kind of poem that you like, (the below prompt for this month, is merely a suggestion); it can be fun, or serious.
  • Write in any language that pleases you, and note that it certainly doesn’t have to be in English. As this is a joint challenge with Ineke, from Scrapydo2, note that she will also post the challenge in Afrikaans on her blog, so if that language suits you better, visit her here.
  • Add the A and I Poetry badge if you so wish. (optional)
  • Publish the poem on your blog before the 27th day of that month  adding the tag A and I Poetry Challenge to your post.
  • Once you publish your blog post, please leave a comment here on this page and also at Ineke’s blog, here, listing the URL link to YOUR poem.  [Others can then find their way to your  post and we build a supportive community of poets who visit, read and comment on other’s poetry.

**If you don’t post the link to our blogs with your poetry, it is really hard for us to find you and include a linkback to your blog, for the next month’s challenge.


 Poetry Challenge –  May Prompt

 

*Write a poem using this photograph or one of your own as inspiration.

 

N.B. If you choose to use your own photo, please post the photo along with the poem.

 

Here is my submission for this month:

Caught in the Bubble

Bubbles of air, glass and space,
Where’s the herd who grazed this place?

An artist form with eyes a-looking in.
Glass beads reflecting, seeing out, within.

A shrunken, perhaps yes, a distorted view,
Representing and offering a different hue.

Art is crazy, challenging, new,
Breaking barriers, often pushing taboos.

Take a peek and see much more,
Something’s looking back at you, for sure.

~ Amanda

I struggled with the subject matter for this poem, even though it was my own photo.

Apparently the Japanese creator wanted to accentuate the outer husk or shape of the animal by enhancing it with these beads of glass and acrylic.

A Word a Week Challenge - Glitter



Poetry Challenge Entrants for April:

 



Poetry Tips

  • Formatting – Tools to help you format your poems on your blog, including how to add extra lines in your post without WordPress expunging them on posting, can be found here
  • Live your poem. When you write, imagine you are a participant in your poem. Look around. See what’s happening. Feel the texture of the sticky pine cone. Feel how difficult it is to pull your fingers apart to type afterwards. Listen to the sounds around you. A robin? A whippoorwill? A Tasmanian devil? Smell your panic. Taste the dryness on your tongue, the thin salt. Activate all your senses. Galway Kinnell once said, “If you’re going to write about a frog, become that frog. Inhabit frogness.”
  • Don’t think too much, just write it down.
    Ray Bradbury once said, “Throw yourself off a cliff and build your wings on the way down.” Don’t think too much about what I’m going to write. Let the poem create itself. Discover what you are doing in the process of doing it. It evolves as you put pen to paper.
  •  Incorporate poetry devices
    What else can make your poetry shine like the summer sun? Imagery, metaphors, and symbolism-to name just a few poetry devices-are subtle ways to improve your poetry. By adding rhyme, irony, or tone to your work, you create a phoenix from a dead piece of paper.
    Readers enjoy poetry with meaning, that has a beat or an easy flow, and can be secretive but not beyond their understanding. Great poets know exactly how to incorporate the many elements of poetry into their work.
    Research the many poetry devices (others include simile, figurative language, synecdoche, allegories, and musical devices) and begin practicing with them in your own poetry. Write a poem with a theme you enjoy but base it around irony or a metaphor. Continue to practice each device and work them all into different poems to experience each one’s effect.
    You can find many examples and ways to use poetry devices by reading books on the subject or doing a simple search online. Study and learn each device, because you never know when one might work perfectly for what you are trying to write.

 

In a nutshell:

  1. Use poetry devices to give your work substance.
  2. Readers enjoy reading poetry with inner meaning or special attributes.
  3. It takes practice, hard work, and dedication to master devices like Symbolism, Imagery, or Rhyme.
  4. Finding out about each poetry device is easy; just search online or at your local bookstore or library.
[Source Credit: https://forum.rhymezone.com/articles/884-5-tips-for-writing-better-poetry-how-to-jumpstart-your-writing-by-john-bon%5D

 

I can’t wait to read what you come up with this month.

Don’t forget to link back to this post, on your poetry submission post, and leave a link and comment here so Ineke, Amanda and others can find your post.

Have fun!

~ Amanda and Ineke