Iceland
Book review, Community

Summer Reading

Summer in Australia, means that many of us can use the excuse of the heat, to relax inside the air-con with a good book, guilt free. And if you are anything like me, it would usually be a good crime novel that you reach for.

As my summer is now over, I thought I’d share a few lesser known authors I read, in particular some Icelandic authors. 

Iceland Thingvellir

Authors from Iceland

One Icelandic author that you may not be familiar with is psychological thriller/crime writer, Arnaldur Indridason. I really enjoyed the tone of his books, particularly how he depicts the cold bleak landscape of Iceland using this to not only to illustrate the tragedy and sadness in the plot, but also to reflect thoughtfully on the past.

It’s easy to feel sympathy for Indridason’s protagonist, when the character reveals the great personal cost of police detective work. Two of Indridason’s books include, The Draining Lake and Tainted Blood which is alternatively: “Jar City” and both give an insight into police procedures.

Jar city is the story of a murder mystery that spans a generation and discusses the implications of inherited traits or diseases in a country where they Human genome project is extremely topical. (The Icelandic genetic pool has, to a large extent, been isolated from external influences). Jar city has been made into a motion picture and the cinematography in certain rural scenes, is absolutely fantastic, as one would expect from a country as scenic as Iceland. And right now, virtual travel is best!

‘The Draining Lake’ delves a little into historical fiction and Icelandic political attitudes during the Cold War era, so it also provided an insight into cultural beliefs of that time. For example, police staff being rung at home by members of the public or getting into political arguments with suspects, seems not to be an unusual occurrence for detectives in Iceland. 

Iceland

One Review states,” THE DRAINING LAKE boasts an interesting and unusual angle, especially for those of us not familiar with Iceland’s recent history. There’s a link to the Cold War and spying, and to the 1950s when idealistic Icelandic teenagers went to study in East Germany. Unlike Indridason’s earlier books, where I never felt much of a sense of place, Iceland and its society plays a more vital role in this book – particularly as the posting from hell for diplomats! “

Suggested reads  by Icelandic authors: Arnaldur Indridason or,  if your preference is not for thrillers/crime, you might like to try Iceland’s Nobel prize for Literature winner Halldor Laxness, whose books are available include, Independent People, The Fish can Sing, Iceland’s Bell and Atom Station. I hope you find these entertaining as Icelandic literature is something well worth pondering over.

snow

Reading Recommendations

Blogger M-R has just referred me to the Daughters of Time, which I downloaded on the Kindle last night, so I am keen to get started on that book today.

I hope you enjoy discovering some new authors this summer. (Or winter if you are living in the south).

Do you have any recommendations of books you have read lately?

Crime fiction/Historical Fiction/Autobiographies? It matters not the genre.

I would love to hear them.

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Community

31 Days of Free Writing Day 3

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Five minutes of Free Writing Association  – A way of me to document my thoughts as summer approaches – a kind of cyber diary. Today’s theme – Capture

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8.45pm

The ever-changing nature of the seasons help us notice the passing of each calendar year and summer even more so than the other four, oops three seasons, as it arrives in December, in Australia. H Handstand on beach (Small)

My summers are sub-tropical, and outdoor life a large feature. We have many barbeques with sizzling sausages, and salad, we swim, lots, we paddle in rock pools and walk the length of shoreline at the beach; we watch the waves crash repeatedly on the sand, we dive beneath the waves, and get sand up our nose; we go walking in the cool glades of rain-forest trails where waterfalls gush; we get saturated in torrential, summer thunderstorms, we eat ice cream late in the evening, we listen to the mosquitoes hum at twilight, and we lather sunscreen everywhere! All these summery events are capture on our cameras, phones, or mobile devices.

GELATIBELLAGIOFamily 2013 181

I like to take photographs, and I take many, many photos. I like the way photographs stop the endless march. For then and it is only then, we can reflect, and consider, and fully appreciate the moment in the photograph without distraction. Photographs freeze that special moment of surprise when you open a gift, or show the tearful toddler who has scraped their knee. They hold intact our memories. They stop the endless march of aging. They stop time! And my time has just run out.  More tomorrow…..

IMG_0220DSC_0142What do you like to capture on film? Something to Ponder About

Community

Photo 101 Day Eight: Natural World Leading Lines

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It seems I have loads of photos of the man made world where lines lead your eyes around the photograph but this is one of the few I can lay my hands on at the moment that comes form the natural world.  Taken at the Ginger Factory in Yandina, Australia, where the terrential summer rain was really taking hold….. Nothing like a Tropical thunderstorm to freshen up the air.

Day 8 of Photo 101 – Something for the lens to look and ponder about