Monday Mystery Photo – Last Week Rjukan, Norway

Each Monday, I post a mystery photo, or occasionally a mystery object. I invite you to leave a comment, if you think you know the location of this week’s photograph. Please note that I will release comments in the latter part of each week, usually Thursday or Friday and in this way, everyone can have a guess without a spoiler being revealed.

If you guess the correct location, I will link back to your blog when the answer is revealed the following Monday.

Guest contributions to MMP are very welcome. Please flick me an email if you have a photo to submit.

This week’s photo is shown below. Can you guess the location?

MMP 2014It
Do you know what this is and where it is located?

Last Week’s Monday Mystery Photograph

vesttorry

Last week’s photograph was correctly identified by Tidious Ted from the wonderful WordPress cooking blog, Recipe Reminiscing.  As the MMP was located in Ted’s native country of Norway, I will leave it to him to tell us more about the location:

“As I’ve lived 11 years in Telemark and had customers all over the county this week’s mystery photo is so easy for my that I almost feel ashamed answering at all. The photo is from Rjukan in Telemark, Norway and the huge building in the back is Norway’s national industry museum. It was once Norway’s largest power station and the place where three movies about the the action preventing the Nazis getting hold of the deuteriumoksid (heavy water) produced there during WWII were filmed. Older people may still remember “Heros of Telemark” filmed in 1965 with Kirk Douglas and Richard Harris in lead parts. A Norwegian film about the action “Kampen om tungtvannet” was made in 1848 and a recent movie about the same action was made just a few years ago.” – Tidious Ted

Thanks so much for all that wonderful information, Ted. Here is a youtube clip of a modern day team re-creating the heroic action of the men that stalled the Nazi’s atomic bomb program in WWII.

TheSnowmeltsSomewhere also very cleverly recognized that last week’s location as Norway, even though she didn’t recognize the museum building!! Incredibly astute SnowMS!

!Monday Mystery

Monday Mystery Photo leaves you with Something to Ponder About

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Traditional Norwegian Painting – Rosemaling Rules and Telemark Technique

Something to Ponder About

Rosemaling – the traditional painting of Norway!

Ah, the joy of painting. So little time and so many pieces of wood to paint…. the folk artist’s lament! Determined to get something painted this week, I traced a pattern on a base painted plate. I will share a few of the secrets to successful painting here.

For more on the history of Rosemaling, click on this link:
http://forestwood.webs.com/norwegianfolkart.htm

For the uninitiated, oils are quicker to paint because they blend so easily and beautifully, but take up to six weeks to dry….

On the other hand acrylic paint dries fast, does not give so much coverage and as for blending colours and shading/highlighting in acrylics…. well that has developed into an art form all by itself. It can be difficult to get a gradual blend of acrylic colour, even with chemical assistance such as retarders and various mediums that assist you…

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Weekend project – Rosemaling

A rainy weekend is perfect for catching up on all those unfinished tasks – don’t you think? Well at least putting a dent in the pile of UFO’s.

Telemark Bowl
Telemark Bowl

A project I started years back, as evidenced by the badly formed C scroll, was completed yesterday. Apart from the C scroll it was reasonably pleasing to the eye. What was even more pleasing to the soul,was to remove one more piece from the “To Do” list.

Time to finish this project!
Time to finish this project!
Close up of liner work in Burnt umber and Raw Umber
Close up of liner work in Burnt umber and Raw Umber

I painted this in Acrylics, and the bowl was once part of a Norfolk Island pine tree. Turned at the same place. Perhaps it was a young sapling in the times when colonials graced its shores and the torturous cat o nine tails was a daily scourge metered out on the convicts, who resided there. Poor souls. I picked this shallow bowl up in a thrift shop: unwanted, and unloved, like many of the convicts on Norfolk Island itself. It will now become a fruit bowl in my kitchen.

All decorated in US Telemark Rosemaling along the lines of Shirley Peterich and Pam Rucinski, ( whom I credit for the design), the bowl will always be a reminder for me to ponder the tragic history of Norfolk Island, and how something can be transformed from unwanted beginnings, into a  functional whole again.