Community

Proverbial Friday – Jealousy

south bank at night 20150605_195413//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Love sees sharply, hatred sees even more sharp, but Jealousy sees the sharpest, for it is love and hate at the same time.

Arab Proverb
IMG_8533

“Jealousy is rubbing salt into your own wound. “

 Terri Guillemets



 How often does a partner, family member or friend have a behaviour that makes you feel jealous or uncomfortable? Have you ever tried to change it, or them? It seldom works and often times they will hate you for it.  Has that been your experience?

If someone feels they get more attention, than them, they feel less worthy because we think there is a limit to their love!

There is not. 

Let them be right if that’s what they need.

Mark and Angel


Maroochy River  Proverbial friday

It is far easier to change yourself.

What has worked for you? Join in the discussion.

Everyone’s opinion is important.  Tell me yours.

Proverbial Friday – always Something to Ponder About

Community

Proverbial Friday – Quitting

If you must play, decide upon three things at the start: the rules of the game, the stakes, and the quitting time.  ~ Chinese Proverb

Weekly Quotes

I may have shared the Gandhi quote previously, but it is soberingly valuable words to repeat: –

  • “Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words. Keep your words positive because your words become your behavior. Keep your behavior positive because your behavior becomes your habits. Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values. Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny.–Mahatma Gandhi

  • You just keep pushing. You just keep pushing. I made every mistake that could be made. But I just kept pushing.” –Rene Descartes

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned.  Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

I invite you to join in the discussion by leaving a comment,

as everyone’s opinion is important.

What is yours?

Does Descartes’ words resonate with you? Have you gained insight after pushing too much?

And why might the Chinese be emphatic about a Quitting time?

Proverbial Friday gives you something profound to ponder about.
Now posting on Fridays
Community

Proverbial Friday

Several years ago, I created ‘Proverbial Friday’ on my blog. I became fascinated with traditional proverbs and sayings, their metaphorical layers and the many different interpretations found within just a few, succinct words. I marveled at their ability to transcend race, religion, opinions and age. Mostly anonymous, proverbs are a portal through time to generations past and echo a diverse range of cultures. They speak, to me, of the experiences of many lessons learnt and the wisdom from thousands of lives already lived. Not only that, but they offer us knowledge; knowledge that is passed to us in much the same way relay runners might pass a baton. Once it’s handed over, it is up to us what we do with it and how we pass it on.

 

Weekly Quotes –  On Learning

 

 

The more I awaken, the less I desire to fit in

– Unknown

 

This quote appears to encourage individuality, but then I read this which contradicts the first in some way…..

 

“People who are truly effective,

didn’t get there by chilling out.”

 

Hallingdal Golfjellet

 

The first quote praises inventiveness, initiative and creativity, sullying the notion of collaboration and conformity.

The second quote gives us a reference to hard work and not quitting?

I suppose it depends on what you consider “effective” might be.

What do you think?

Are these sayings too subjective to be constructive suggestions for us?

 

Weekly Proverb – On Learning

Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

path journey 20170715_083310.jpg  

Keep learning because knowledge is the key to power ~ Polish Proverb  
 

I invite you to join in the discussion, by leaving a comment.

Because everyone’s opinion is important.

What is yours?

cropped-stpa1.jpg  

Proverbial Friday – Something to Ponder About

denmark thatch cottage
Community

Proverbial Friday – Wisdom for Life

Weekly Quote

“Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck.”

~ Unknown

 

flower

 

I became fascinated with traditional proverbs and sayings, their metaphorical layers and the many different interpretations found within just a few, succinct words. I marveled at their ability to transcend race, religion, opinions and age.

Several years ago, I created ‘Proverbial Friday’ on my blog.  Mostly anonymous, proverbs are a portal through time to generations past and echo a diverse range of cultures. They speak, to me, of the experiences of many lessons learnt and the wisdom from thousands of lives already lived.

Not only that, but they offer us knowledge; knowledge that is passed to us in much the same way relay runners might pass a baton. Once it’s handed over, it is up to us what we do with it and how we pass it on.

 

Weekly Proverb

 

danish house

 

 

The house that is built after every man’s advice

seldom gets a roof.

~ Danish Proverb

What could the Danish proverb be telling us? Is it similar to the trite saying: Too many cooks spoil the broth?” Or could there be another layer of meaning to this quote?

 

I invite you to join in the discussion by leaving a comment.

Everyone’s opinion is important.

What is yours?

Stpa

Proverbial Friday – Something to Ponder About

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Soender Felding, Denmark
Community

Poetry Challenge – OctPoWriMo

The following poem is the one I have always liked and I wrote it so quickly – it must be that writing from the heart, makes a difference.

I am submitting it for the October poetry month challenge. A little late but I have been occupied with hosting my own poetry challenge, which ends this month, well, last month, now that today is officially November.

You can check out another of my poems here/2018/11/01/poetry-challenge-october-prompt-2/

architecture boats buildings canal
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

‘Still in my Heart’

Home Sweet Home afar from me,
At least 10 hours over sky and sea,

A fairy tale land of red and white,
of rain, and wind, and winter nights.

Yet still you send my heart a flutter,
And here, I can but get your butter,

Cos’ when I’m sad and feeling down,
You can lift my spirits like a children’s clown.

What is this strange longing and connection,
I feel for such warm and fuzzy introspection?

Of land and family long dead and passed,
Would they think me to be completely daft?

Yet I am of them, and they are of me,
This continual spreading of the family tree.

The branches are like the ancient Birch
Resilient, pervasive til one drops off the Perch.

If only I could stay or perhaps visit more often,
But my responsibilities and circumstances rarely soften.

So I must dream and wish and be ever so frugal,
And if I can’t afford to travel there, there is always Google!

~ The Sunshine Elves

Andrea Heiberg
Poetry Dedication:

In memory and thanks for a great friend, Andrea Heiberg.

You are watching now from another place, I place I cannot yet go.

Just what are you thinking, I do wonder.

~Amanda

Stpa

Community

Traditional Art – Buddhist Thangka

 

Very likely one of the oldest Buddist symbols, the Wheel of Life is a popular theme in traditional Tibetan Buddhist art and it is known as the Thangka. Historically this highly skilled art form is commissioned for both spiritual and mundane matters, such as aiding the sick,  or to gain merit during commemoration of religious events.

At one time, Buddhist monks used to draw beautiful and complex mandalas on the ground, using colored sand. Once the Mandala was completed, it was removed as conclusion of the ritual, a strong symbol of the impermanence of reality.

 

patan Temple Katmandu

 

 

 

 

One of our treasured artistic possessions from a trip to Bhaktapur, in Nepal, is a Tibetan Buddhist Thankgka painted on silk, pictured below.

 

Buudhist art Apologies for the reflection on the image.

 

Thangkas are painted by the monks themselves, and the art form demands great mastery over drawing, as well as a high understanding of the geometric and iconographic principles within this style of traditional art.

Lamas and pilgrims would carry them in ceremonial processions and Thangkas were hung in monasteries as a way to display Buddhist teachings, in pictorial form.

Certain pictorial elements are outlined in 24 carat gold and are still considered an important method for studying and preserving the religion, history, culture and traditions of the Himalyan countries of Tibet, India and Nepal.

Here you can see the painstaking and long hours needed to produce this work of art:
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YyptY72-rk]

What do the Symbols Mean?

This art form is highly formalized typically seen as four or five concentric rings, or their symbolic equivalents, depicting the realms of existence associated with the journey towards enlightenment.

 

  • In the central ring, you will often find the intertwined images of a pig, a rooster, and a snake which symbolically depict the three “kleshas,” (mental states affecting actions), being ignorance, greed and aggression, called Samsara. These three states characterize the world of suffering and dissatisfaction.The snake and bird can be seen coming out of the mouth of the pig, indicating that anger and attachment arise from ignorance. At the same time the snake and the bird grasp the tail of the pig, indicating that they both promote even greater ignorance.

 

  • Half of the second ring depicts light, showing contented people moving upwards to higher states, possibly to the higher realms whilst the remaining half-circle, (usually dark), shows people in a miserable state being led downwards to lower states, or realms. These images represent karma, the law of cause and effect. The light half-circle indicates people experiencing the results of positive actions, the dark indicating negative action.

Propelled by their karma, beings take rebirth in the six realms of Samsara, as shown in the next ring.

 

  • The outer rim of the wheel is often divided into twelve section.  Whilst the three inner layers display the three poisons that lead to karma, and the suffering of the six realms, the twelve links in the outer rim show how this can happen. This is reference to cause and effect, or karma, over several lifetimes, demonstrating our current life and how our past lives and our present action influence us and our future.
  • The outer area contains decorative floral motifs and mythical animals, which were elements introduced into Buddhist painting in the mid – twentieth century by Newar artists of the Kathmandu valley.

 

 

  • Surrounding the wheel is either Mara, the fearsome demon who tempted Buddha, or Lord ‘Yama’, the Lord of Death, with his tiger skin hanging beneath the wheel, (indicating fearsome- ness), and it is he, who holds the wheel of life in his hands. Regardless of which figure is depicted, it represents impermanence and the transient nature of existence; everything within this wheel is constantly changing. The four limbs, (that clutch the wheel) symbolize the sufferings of birth, old age, sickness, and death.

By contemplating on the twelve sections of the outer ring, one gains greater insight into karma and this insight enables us to begin to unravel our habitual way of thinking and reacting.

  • The twelve outer sections, paired with their corresponding symbols, are:

lack of knowledgea blind person, often walking, or a person peering out

constructive volitional activitya potter shaping a vessel or vessels

consciousnessa man or a monkey grasping a fruit

name and form (constituent elements of mental and physical existence) – two men afloat in a boat

six senses (eye, ear, nose, tongue, body, and mind) – a dwelling with six windows

contactlovers consorting, kissing, or entwined

painan arrow to the eye

thirsta drinker receiving drink

graspinga man or a monkey picking fruit

coming to bea couple engaged in intercourse, a standing, leaping, or reflective person***

being bornwoman giving birth

old age and deathcorpse being carried

*** The images of the couple lying together in a sexual union, we were told, was never intended to be pornographic, but rather to excite and increase the potency of fertility, especially for males! Devotees consider all creation begins with the sacred union of male and female energies. To experience the pure creative passion between man and woman they believe; to know unconditional love, is to manifest the body, mind, and spirit of a Buddha.

Something traditional to Ponder About

happy smile-beach
Community

Australia Day – Thongs and All

We all know that Australia is a land of sun, surf, sand and sun-kissed beauties, right? And it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to work out that such stereotypes aren’t always accurate. And just like an inaccurate stereotype, there is a growing sense that the date chosen for our national day, January 26, is inaccurate and needs to be reviewed.  While that debate rages, this year’s Australia Day post, on StPA, challenges a few of those typical Australian stereotypes.

 Cricket

I refer to writer Ben Groundwater’s article,  wherein he suggests that Australians are so obsessed with the game of cricket that, “all hell will break loose if you so much as go to touch the remote control, for the TV, during cricket season, even though no one really watches it”!

So is it True? Well, Yes and No.8pccricketset._8pc-plastic-kids-cricket-set-bat-ball-kit-3-stumps.jpg

Yes, because there are loads of men, over 40 years of age, who really love “the cricket.” Our local Doctor, is one, for example. He has such an obsession with cricket that we hesitate to make a non-urgent appointment with him, over the summer, lest we keep him from checking the cricket score and current state of play, which he is apt to do between patient consultations.

20180127_151801

And Yes, it is true, because almost every Australian child grows up, whether they like it or not, playing backyard cricket over Christmas. Armed with a tennis ball and a plastic discount store set of ‘stumps,’ (invariably a Christmas gift from their Grandpa), they’re subtlety groomed in the art of this iconic Australian pastime. Sure, it is fun when you are a kid and there is nothing else to do, but not for too long….

cricket

But the answer for me and many others is more likely to be No, and that is because, as I see it, the Cricket-loving fraternity is fast declining, mostly due to the soporific nature of the game.

If you love sport because of the dynamic action, cricket can be excruciatingly slow, even torpid, and it continues that way, for hours, nigh days, on end. For instance, one could read several chapters of a Tolstoy novel during a test match without looking up, and you would not miss anything crucial, such is the lengthy interval between ‘wickets’ or anything mildly riveting. Riveting means a batsman achieving a ‘4’ or a ‘6’ – (for the uninitiated, that is when the ball is hit out to, or over, the boundary fence).

When this does happen, there will be the mandatory slow clap or raucous cheers, some momentary back slapping quickly followed by a return to the sluggish, dare I say, boring, lethargy as the next ball is bowled down the pitch again. Feeling slightly anesthetized by my description? Try watching it for six hours a day!!!

cricket match

And yet, perhaps the groggy pace is the attraction of it, after all. A chance to sleep whilst still maintaining consciousness? There IS a large sector of the population that will admit to hating cricket, it is just that they are either too polite or much less vocal about it. Knowing just how vital the game is to the slightly sensitive Australian ego, it would seem unpatriotic somehow, not to support it.

Ben continues his article:

“The cricket is on, but no one’s watching. The sun is out, but you can’t go swimming. There’s no air-con, but you do have an inflatable paddling pool on the patio.”

Is it True? Yes and No.

Yes – it is hot here, really hot, but more than that, in the Northern half of Australia, it is stiflingly humid. This makes us all feel incredibly unmotivated, sweaty and listless.  Want to go swimming to cool off? The water in the backyard pool is tepid, which doesn’t help. In the tropical areas, there are stingers in the water, some of which are extremely deadly. Inland there is, thankfully, no stingers, just the fresh water crocodiles you have to be on alert for. Eek!

Relief from the heat back in the twentieth century, pre air-con days came from the backyard swimming pool, which could be anything from an inflatable paddling pool to a 15 metre long, chlorinated behemoth. Nowadays, those folk with air-conditioned houses, sit inside with windows shut tight, almost trapped, cocoon-like from the outside elements, whilst the backyard swimming pools, standard household equipment north of Sydney until recent years, lay completely dormant or even redundant. Houses get bigger and yards become small, filled with aesthetic ikebana-like gardens. Things are changing in Australia!

Alternatively, Aussies head to the beach in their cars, to escape the summer heat. Invariably everyone seems to have the same idea, at the same time, which results in in major traffic jams on the highways out of the cities.

pexels-photo-785065.jpeg

Traffic jams on the highways to the beach, crowded beaches with little adjacent car parking and loads of screaming, unhappy, sunburnt children. Summer in Australia? I am just as happy with Winter in Australia, thank you.

Ben gives us some advice on visiting Australia:

You’ll get sunburnt, even in Tassie

This ain’t no Mediterranean sun. You can’t go out there in factor 10+ bronzer and expect to survive the day. In Australia, you get burnt. If you don’t slip, slop, slap, and constantly reapply, you’ll be hideously toasted by the end of the day. The surprising thing is that this is true for the whole country – especially in Tasmania, our southernmost part.

Is it true? Yes, Absolutely yes.

Always wear a hat, light shirt and Sunscreen – period! Premature wrinkles and skin cancers are not to be taken lightly. A few serious sunburns early in life, can leave you prone to developing cancerous skin lesions, later. Especially if you play cricket in the backyard without sun protection!! Beware!

Aussies love Thongs

Ben’s article moves to the subject of Australia footwear, or lack thereof. Australians really like to wear thongs, if they can’t get away with bare feet. Whilst many Americans will be guffawing silently at this point, Ben and every Aussie knows that thongs are different to the American variety – they are not flip-flops, never ever’ Jandals’, but only ‘Thongs.’ And they belong on your feet and nowhere else!

rubber thongs

“And in summer we’ll wear thongs pretty much everywhere. We’ll wear them to the beach, to barbecues, to the cricket, to the pub, to dinner, and to anywhere else we might happen to end up. It’s a stereotype, and it’s kind of daggy, but it’s true. After all, thongs come in handy – you might need them to kill a cockroach.”

feet
Daggy but we love them – thongs

Giant Cockroaches? What the….  Is it True?

Yes, absolutely yes. And they are not nice. In fact, they are huge and quite disgusting. Disgusting, really grotesque, but essentially harmless. Harmless unless they crawl over your food or food utensils, of course.  Then you just want to spray the entire house in a cloud of deadly pesticide, to absolutely eradicate the vile creatures from your midst. But you don’t, because, being in Australia, you have the perfect weapon already to hand. For this is exactly the moment when your excellent Aussie footwear, the humble thong, becomes dual purpose!  Just grab that rubber thong and snap that repugnant insect dead. Super flexible with a speedy rebound, the rubber thong is deadly to Australian insects!

Important to note if you wish to blend in with the general Aussie population, is that it’s quite acceptable and sometimes essential, to use expletives such as, ‘Gotcha you little bugger/bastard,’ as you swat that bug! It feels even better when you do!!!

main_australia-cockroach

So, if you are in Australia this Australia Day  swatting bugs, wearing thongs, or even being serenaded by the traditional backyard cricket game, relax and be thankful for the country that is Australia. Prepared first by our Indigenous peoples, and later by British and European settlers, I celebrate each and every Australian. We are what we are, thongs and all. After all, to not celebrate Australia Day is’ just not cricket’, is it?

Happy Australia Day from Amanda at StPA.

– Something to Ponder About

Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdom

Proverbial thursdfly sml 3932

Proverbs and sayings often provide us with wise words from all corners of the world.  Best savoured a little at a time, these sayings are passed down from generation to generation. Each Thursday, I post a saying, or proverb and a quote that I find thought-provoking. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

 

The theme of this week’s wisdom is kindness.

“The best place to find a helping hand is at the end of your own arm”

– Swedish Proverb

You cannot do a kindness too soon, for you never know how soon it will be too late

 -Ralph Waldo Emerson

[Ralph Waldo Emerson was an American essayist, lecturer, and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century- Wiki.]

My Yoga teacher used to say that,

“Smiling was an art that comes from the heart and should be practised all the time.”

The kindest people I have met have had the loveliest, most genuine smiles. The heart may be the centre of love, but the smile is the centre of kindness!

Life may buffet and bruise us and although we put on a brave front, life experience and  hard knocks are indelibly etched on our faces, and especially on our smiles.

If someone can’t find a smile, give them one of yours. Light up their day!

 

No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.

Kindness costs nothing, yet can make a world of difference.

Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible!”  -Dalai Lama

 

The Swedish proverb seems to both reinforce and contradict this advice.

What do you think?

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment below.

 

Blog

 

Proverbial Thursdays at Something to Ponder About

friends
Community

Proverbial Thursday

Proverbs and sayings often provide us with wise words from all corners of the world.  Best savoured a little at a time, these sayings are passed down from generation to generation. Each Thursday, I post a saying, or proverb and a quote that I find thought-provoking.

I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

Roses

The quotes and proverbs I have chosen this week, relate to friendship.

That eternal concept that occupies much of our daily thoughts.

My daughter is having a crisis of sorts in her friendship group.

It is often complicated navigating adolescence with teenage girls.

 

 

The friends of our friends are our friends –

-Congolese Proverb

 

and this:

Promises may get friends, but ’tis performances that keep them –

Plutarch

(Thanks to the blogger Peggy for the book from which the quote came).

 

Friends come and go frequently in our life. They are often themed around where we live, what we do, hobbies and interests.

Sometimes friends can be unhelpful or hurtful leading one down a dangerous path. 

Fair weather friends are hard to understand.

Moreover, though, friendship is a beneficial experience.

Friends can help a person cope with extraordinary struggle and pain with a simple hug or a welcoming smile.

Friends reflect back society’s attitudes in a softer way, guiding us to where we have gone wrong.

Friends might let one down, but also reassure, entertain and teach.

Friends may live close by or far away..

Friends care.

Friends through Art

 

Why do we feel so heartbroken when a friendship collapses? Commonly, another friend may soon enters one’s life, and when this happens, we then have a wonderful opportunity to meet someone different. Someone with new perspectives and values.

Why, then, is it so hurtful to lose a friend?

What do you make of the proverb and quote for this week?

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment.

Blog

Proverbial Thursday

Something to Ponder About

Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdoms

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too.

This week, I present several quotes that are interconnected.

 

proverbial thursday

“Only when we fully embrace change, can you find the good in it.”

Dr Travis Bradbury

 

Stradbroke Island

“You do the thing you’re scared shit-less of and then you get your courage. Not before.

That’s the way it works” – [from The Three Kings]

 

Does courage really come secondary to actions? I feel one must have courage and fortitude to initiate a dangerous manoeuvre, to ignore and override those instincts of self-preservation.

What do you think?

 

But then, there is this:

“We cling to the views that are familiar to us” – unknown

 

 

Why do we cling to the familiar?

Because familiar viewpoints make us feel safe and more predictable?

Is our perspective of actions, a kind of spectrum, wherein at one end, we would sit within a bubble, or a cocoon, safe and never stretching ourselves, and the other, indulge in highly dangerous and risk taking behaviour, stepping completely out of our comfort zone? Some risk takers say that is when they feel most alive?

How do we achieve the middle ground? Is that where we would feel most satisfied and most alive, without dancing with death? 

 

The final word comes from Anais Nin: –

“Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.”

 

artsy photo

 

 

I would love to hear your thoughts on courage. Join in the discussion by leaving a comment.

 

Proverbial Thursday – Something to Ponder About

 

 

 

daisy
Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdoms

I find profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too.

 

If you are filled with pride, you won’t have room for wisdom.

African Proverb

 

 

Vigeland

 

 

I have always felt pride as an emotion, centered in the heart or chest, and wisdom to be centered in the head.

Can pride manifest in thoughts only, or does it always involve emotion?

 

We understand life backwards,

but have to live it forwards

– Kierkegaard

 

IMG_8594 (2)

 

What do you make of the Danish Philosopher, Kierkegaard’s comments?

Is this true for you?

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment below.

 

Blog

Proverbial Thursday – Something wistful to Ponder About

lonely
Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdoms

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too. 

The proverb this week contains a warning regarding ‘loose lips’ – at least that is the way I see it!

Do you have another interpretation?

Proverb of the Week:

Ron Mueck Exhibition Old Woman

Don’t make use of another’s mouth unless it has been loaned to you-

Belgian Proverb


Quote of the Week:

koala

Only in solitude, do we find ourselves – Miguel de Unamuno

20171010_084529

Miguel de Unamuno was a Spanish intellectual and writer, who thought that history could best be understood by looking at the small histories of anonymous people, rather than by focusing on major events such as wars and political pacts.

Life was tragic, according to Unamuno, because of the knowledge that we are to die. He explains much of human activity as an attempt to survive, in some form, after our death.

Unamuno: “Those who believe they believe in God, but without passion in the heart, without uncertainty, without doubt, and even at times without despair, believe only in the idea of God, and not in God himself.”

Unamuno summarized his personal creed thus: “My religion is to seek for truth in life and for life in truth, even knowing that I shall not find them while I live. [Wiki]

What do you make of Miguel’s words?

When you are alone, is this where you really are yourself?

Or does the loneliness and quiet of solitude unsettle you?

Do you fear loneliness, will be a curse, as you age?

Join in the discussion, by leaving a comment of your thoughts

Something to Ponder About this Thursday

rosemaling
Community, History & Traditions

What is the Art of the People?

Our identity is rooted in our history and icons from each person’s cultural heritage. Folk art, or the art of the people, comprises one aspect of this cultural heritage. But if folk art represents our history, then this must be constantly evolving and accumulating, with each passing year? It can not, by its nature, be static. As time marches on, so must our cultural heritage.

‘Folk art’ encompasses art produced from an indigenous culture, or by peasants, or other laboring tradespeople. In contrast to fine art, folk art is primarily utilitarian and decorative rather than purely aesthetic. – [Wikipedia]

The art of the people or ‘ folk’ represents a moment in time; it talks of what life was, and is, like, for those folk,or people. Is it important to preserve that for future generations?

marimekko

What is today’s cultural heritage or folk art? Traditional artifacts, or everyday objects and memories that are relevant for individual people?slow cooker

Scandinavian festival

“Even though many objects produced today are mass produced consumables, with a short lifespan, they represent an important pillar for our identity.”

[Valdres FolkeMuseum, Fagernes]
IMG_20140914_113038 (Small)

 

Iconic objects that have strong personal or cultural meaning may also comprise folk art and memorabilia of today’s society.

yeahnah

Some objects may represent passion or tell a story, have some aesthetic frame around people’s lives or have some meaning in a cultural sense.

 

Family 2014 017-001

 

What objects would you include in a museum exhibit from this decade?

What object has meaning to you, in today’s society? What could represent your folk art, or cultural heritage from this decade? Is it a photograph, CD, machine, or artwork?

Please share your thoughts.