Proverbial Friday

 

I find River boats artthere to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned.

Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Weekly Proverb

 

“Man ska inte köpa grisen i säcken”

One shouldn’t buy the pig in the sack

 Swedish Proverb

 

Is this proverb a caution similar to suggesting that a ‘buyer beware?” A warning against buying items, sight unseen? Or could there be a deeper hidden layer of meaning?

Weekly Quotes

“If you don’t stick to your values when they’re being tested, they’re not values:

they’re just hobbies”

-Jon Stewart

 

and this:

Social comparison is the thief of happiness. 

You could spend a lifetime worrying about what others have,

but it wouldn’t get you anything

~ Marc and Angel

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment.

Everyone’s opinion is important. What is yours?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~ Amanda from Something to Ponder About

 

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Proverbial Friday – Wise Words for Life

Weekly Proverb

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You can’t heal stubbornness

~ Polish Proverb

 

 

Does this proverb reflect something about the Polish culture itself, or might it have a wider resonance in our daily lives?

We might be stubborn about matters that are important to us, because we want to be on the winning side of an argument, that is not to say that we are fixated on winning for the sake of winning, but more so that we feel reassured that others think similarly to us). If so, then this might reflect some feelings of inferiority in our inner self.

Perhaps it might also be we are concrete thinkers about right and wrong?

On the other hand, could fighting for what you believe is right, be considered by some as also being stubborn, but in a positive sense?

 

 

Weekly Quotes

There is a big empasis on working collaboratively these days, especially in the workplace. The following quote seems to confirm that approach. however, where does that leave the individual prodigy? Like the Flying fox – out on a limb?

 

It is one of the most beautiful compensations of life that no man can sincerely try to help another without helping himself

~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

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Shall we aim to help each other more!

 

Then there is this quote from Wolfgang von Goethe:

 

Some consider Wolfgang von Goethe’s quote, to be validation for positive criticism of a person or their ability. If you believe someone to be more capable than they outwardly demonstrate, can having another source, push you to lift your standards? Does it allow the person to see themselves from a different perspective?

 

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned.

Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

proverbial-thurs

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment.

Everyone’s opinion is important. What is yours?

Poetry Challenge – September Prompt

A little late but here is my contribution to the A and I Poetry Challenge for September.

I am not the girl in the poem, rather I am the one living in the tropics yearning for some cooler weather.

Thingvellir

 

 

In Iceland, a girl yearned for some heat,

to soothe her aching, chill-blained feet.

With her savings she gained,

A ticket on a plane,

Soon stepping her toes on the beach.

 

 

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September Prompt

Write a limerick poem on the change of the season and post on your blog before 28th September. If you live in the Northern hemisphere, write about the onset of Autumn. Those living in the South, including Ineke and Amanda, write about the onset of Spring.

A Limerick is a humorous poem wherein the first line sets up the character(s) and setting, so the reader knows right away who/what the story is about.

Only five lines long, limerick poems have an ‘AABBA’ rhyme scheme.

If you wish to join in with the final month of the challenge, click on the link below:

 

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Poetry Challenge – September Round up

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

The Prompt for September was to write a Limerick or humorous poem.

Only five lines long, limerick poems have an ‘AABBA’ rhyme scheme.

 

Featured Poets – Colonialist’s Blog

 

 

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I do suppose that each season
Does come with a kind of a reason,
And most are quite fine,
But I draw the line
At seasons that have my toes freezin’!

 

~The Colonialist

 

 

Find more about the Colonialist here

 

 

Hester writes a real cracker, really capturing the essence of the limerick’s humor:

 

An OLD bird who LIVES at the COAST

Lied DOWN in the SUN and she DOZED

She THOUGHT a light TAN

Would CATCH her a MAN

But NOW she’s burnt CRISP as dry TOAST

 

~Hester

This is a really awesome limerick!!! I love it, and it has that memory making sing-song quality so that it sticks in one’s head for quite a while!!

 

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I invite you to read this month’s submissions for the A and I Poetry challenge   who have all done a fantastic job.

 

Poetry Challenge Contributors for September

 

Ju- Lyn  varied the theme of seasons in refashioning-rules  but also decided to give the limerick form a go, here. And I am very glad she did. The limerick is deceptively easy to write but difficult to convey a message in such few words. Ju-Lyn nailed it.

Manjamexi  – penned a cheeky limerick with beautiful illustrations of mouth-watering photographs of a Cypress field many incarnations through the seasons.

Ineke’s delightful limerick on the seasonal changes in New Zealand – Scrapydo2.wordpress.com

Abrie Joubert – writes in Afrikaans but copy paste this into google Translate or use the translator button and you will find some wonderful words.

Abrie’s post on the A and I Poetry Challenge inspired two other Afrikaans writers to write limericks in the comments of Abrie’s post:

Hesterleynel  – she is at it again! Well done, Hester.

Toortsie

Perdebytjie

Very well done to all of you!  The translations were a lot of fun to read! One word translated to diarrhoea!! Not sure that it was meant as such, but it certainly was humorous!!

Hester’s post inspired Vuurklip to contribute in Afrikaans,on Hester blog post here

Tafuzul  – submitted a surpise poem.  He asked me to choose his best poem for his entry this month. Find it here

If you have written a poem in September and would like a linkback included here, please comment below.

Host bloggers Amanda  from Australia at Something to Ponder About and

Ineke from New Zealand at scrapydo2.wordpress.com  jointly host the challenge.

Ineke mostly does the poetry in Afrikaans, while Amanda uses English.

The challenge is open to all, from first-timers up to well-advanced poets. Be sure to comment here so that we can find your poem for October and add you to the link up post at the end of this month.

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October is the final month for the Poetry Challenge.

Poetry Challenge – October Prompt

A and I Poetry Challenge Hosts are a Blogger and Writer, from New Zealand, Ineke, of Scrapydo2 and Blogger from Australia, Amanda, of  Something to Ponder About.

Amanda and Ineke

Amanda’s Poetry challenge is  in English and Ineke’s Poetry Challenge is in Afrikaans, (with many translations in English). Everyone is welcome to join in. October is the final month of this challenge! Please do join in!

You can write in either language, however, please post a link back, and comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge.

For Full guidelines on joining in, click here.

 

October Prompt:

~ Write a poem to, or about, your future self.

How might you see yourself, or your life, in ten years time.

 

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

This prompt is merely a suggestion and you may choose a topic of your liking and still be included in the challenge.

Remember to add the tag A and I Poetry Challenge, to your post, so that I can link to your blog in the final end of month round up of contributors.

 

The challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will include writing tips and link backs for contributors. Beginner poet, hobbyist or Advanced writer We hope you will join in.

You can write in either language, however, please post a link back, and comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge. 

In this way, we can find you and read your poetry.

 

Have fun!

A and I Poetry Challenge

Something poetic to ponder About

Scrapydo2