sea grass
blogging, Environment

“It’s Not Just a Crisis of Climate” – Guest Martin Fredricks IV

It’s Not Just a Crisis of Climate: by Martin C. Fredricks IV

Everything I need to know about the climate crisis and the need to speak positively about what can be done I’ve seen in my daughters’ eyes.

Martin C. Fredricks IV

One is 19 and the other is 13. Both, at different times, have had a slightly fearful but determined look in their eyes while telling me they don’t plan on having children. Each followed it up with, “Why would I….”

“The world’s going to be uninhabitable soon,” each has said in her own way. “Why would I bring kids into that.”

It’s not a question, but a statement of moral conviction. They don’t want it this way, but they’re looking to the future with eyes wide open. They reason it would be wrong to put any additional human beings through what looks likely to be coming.

But there’s no anger or disappointment from me. Just sadness. Not because my wife and I might never have grandchildren, but because our daughters and people their age around their world have to think this way. Theirs is the first generation forced to look at Armageddon not as some far-off, theoretical threat, but as a real possibility within their lifetimes.

I’m partially to blame. I talk, think and write about the climate crisis all the time; no doubt I’ve been too bitter and graphic about it too many times around the dinner table.

But in truth we all share some blame. We’ve enabled the politicians and governments that have their heads stuck deep into the sand, not to mention the lobbying slush funds of fossil-fuels companies. They’re blindly, happily and willfully ignorant of the damage we’re already experiencing.

Think about the power outages in Texas. The fires on the west coast of the USA, in the Amazon and across Australia. The flooding in Indonesia. Or the Covid-19 pandemic around the world. Scientists tell us this particular coronavirus strain was able to jump from animals to humans at least partly because of climate-related habitat loss.

Better still, read scientific reports like “Special Report: Global Warming of 1.5°C” by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the “Fourth National Climate Assessment” by the U.S. Global Change Research Program. They paint a clear, fact-based picture of what’s coming if people do not curtail carbon emissions at least 45 percent by 2030 and down to net zero by 2050.

Yet we still hear officials say climate change is a deception, and we still see social media posts like this from our neighbors:

To which I always respond:

Fortunately, there are starting to be more that say things like:

Which is on the right track. The false debate about climate change’s existence is over.

It’s now time to act.

I’ve been doing what I can, and now, with my daughters’ eyes haunting me, I’m recommitted. That look is in my mind’s eye every time I write a post, march for climate action or attend a meeting about sustainability.

It’s also why I’ve started telling them the good news about the climate crisis –

If human beings start doing the right things right now, there’s still time. We can save our planet and ourselves by electing the right people, pressuring the wrong ones through peaceful protest, stopping financial support for corporations that fund fossil fuel extraction, and doing everything else we can in our own lives and communities.

Because, remember: what we say and what we do make a difference, especially to the people we love most.

So how are you talking about the climate crisis with the most important people in your life?

© 2021 Martin C. Fredricks IV

Every post on Martin’s blog, IV Words, is a foreword to what comes next with the climate crisis, environment, politics, progressive causes, social justice and “the way it is.”

Martin is also an avid photographer.

Check out Martin’s blog at IVWords.com.

32 thoughts on ““It’s Not Just a Crisis of Climate” – Guest Martin Fredricks IV”

  1. We as a family try to get away from the climate hazard ways. There are too many who don’t believe that the climate changed or don’t care about it. We should wake up and put everything we can to prevent climate change. There is still time to prevent further break down.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Maria! To answer the question on your blog – my week has been good. Cold here in North Dakota, USA, but not as cold as a normal week in a normal February. I hope all the vegetables you’ve planted bring you great bounty in the fall!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I believe in climate change. We have 2 things to do: try and slow the pace, AND. adapt. Clinging to what was leads to disappointment. And very much yez, I brought a chikd into thid world and she has brought her child into this world. She will know the world as it is now and maybe be one of those that can bring about change

    Liked by 2 people

    1. What a lovely thought that a child that you had directly or indirectly brought into the world may have a solution to one or some of our problems and will live a life that is more sustainable and friendlier to the planet’s future.
      In our own microcosm, we can absolutely slow the pace and adapt. Reuse where we can, reduce where we can, and show our preferences with ethical, environmentally sound purchases and practices. I am so glad you get this, Appeltjie. Are you amongst many who think similarly in your area?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. We have to keep chipping away at those hardliners. In a gentle way though, as their fears are real to them too. I am speaking generally here, but if deniers feel like climate change activists are attacking them personally, they shut off to information that might help enlighten them. As the movement grows, and things deteriorate, more understanding will follow. In the meantime, writing about it in social media, is a good idea.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. I keep wondering how I can do more in regards to this crisis. I have been having the same thoughts as your daughters regarding children and it really hurts. Hoping serious change will finally occur in 2021.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Me too. I said that I was to partly to blame for their feelings, and I am. But I’m also part of a bigger solution – while I’ve been speaking about the climate crisis so often around the dinner table, they’ve been listening, and they’re both climate activists in their own right.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Amanda, thank you so much for printing this post; it’s so generous of you! And thank you to everyone who takes the time to read the post and speak to their children about the climate crisis – both the bad and the good. Cheers!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Well the only thing wrong with the climate is its doing what it supposed to and the world has always had up and down climates just part of nature .have you heard the old saying only the strong will servie we it’s true to the bone .it doesn’t matter how many electric cars and buses we get it still going to happen so I’m just going to enjoy life and have some fun in my life time

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi KC, You are not alone in your attitude and I do take your point about nature doing what it is doing. We are well aware that Mother Earth will still be here long after we are gone, whether we live it as a liveable planet or a cesspool of anaerobic waste. The strong will survive, but I prefer to have a community around me. We are a community species and the reason we like to gather in groups is that humanity has worked out it is beneficial to us. If we go it alone, we die, and die out as other humanoid like species have before us. It is a self preservation strategy to commune in groups, and share resources. If we don’t understand that and just use what we want, when we want, we are doomed.
      The life you are going to enjoy is as a result of past generations doing things, both good and bad. It is just that now the bad is accelerating faster than nature can keep up and that is a worry.
      I would like to hear more about what you do in your daily life, KC. Would you be kind enough to share? Do you practise any kind of environmentally friendly ways? Or not at all? Do you recycle? Or is that not happening in your area?

      Liked by 1 person

Everyone is important. What do you have to say?

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.