Raspberry Pie with Vanilla Sauce

raspberry

This recipe for Raspberry Pie with Vanilla Sauce comes from Pike at ArtKoppi

On my menu for this weekend. Have you cooked with rhubarb? If so, what did you make?

Easy and quick rhubarb pie

1 egg

3 dl sugar

3.5 dl cream milk

6 dl wheat flour

3 tsp baking powder

100 g of butter

1 l rhubarb (or raspberries or apples)

Beat the eggs and sugar in a mess. You can also choose to float the mixer. Add the cream of milk. Add the flour and baking powder. Finally, add the melted butter and stir. Spread the dough on a baking sheet on a baking tray and sprinkle over the rhubarb. Bake for about 1/2 hour at 200 degrees. Serve with vanilla sauce though. (Google translator)

I made it like this, but next time I would use more whole grain wheat and almond flour! And with ice cream it’s best, of course!

Vanilla sauce
(4 servings)

ingredients
3 dl milk
1 tablespoon of potato flour
2 tbsp sugar
1 egg yolk
2-3 tsp Vanilla Sugar

Measure the boiler cold milk, potato flour and sugar. Add the egg yolk and mix the ingredients properly. Remove pan from the stove and heat all the time still stirring, until the sauce thickens. Do not boil. Remove pan from heat and add vanilla. Cool the sauce between the whipping and providing.

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Poetry Writing tips and Challenge for April

A and I Poetry Challenge

The A and I Poetry challenge is jointly hosted by Amanda and Ineke and is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will run from March to October, 2018.  We will share tips, offer a monthly prompt and post link backs to your published Poetry posts.

Please scroll down to see April’s poetry writing tips.

Instructions for joining are on the Poetry Challenge Page. You are very welcome to enter.

You can write any kind of poem that you like, as the prompt is merely a suggestion. Write in any language you like; it certainly doesn’t have to be in English. As this is a joint challenge with Ineke, she will also post the challenge in Afrikaans on her blog, so if that language suits you better, visit her here.

N.B. Please leave a comment here if you wish to be included in the Ping backs for this month.

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Poetry Challenge – April Prompt:

Write a poem that begins with the last thing you can remember someone saying to you yesterday. So if you can use that line two to three times throughout your poem.

 

Here is my Poem for April, inspired by Anie, who is one of my lovely readers: –

raindrops

 

Anie’s Rain

Like raindrops falling on to glass, I can not fight this force

that propels me forward to the end.

Like raindrops falling on to glass, it is fruitless to fight

what I cannot control.

Like raindrops falling on to glass, each journey individual, different from another.

Some hurry, sliding past, more sort of slow and steady,

one might falter at the start, coalesce or lose identity in groups,

Softly seductive, their lifetime short, imprint merely temporary,

All one substance.

One end.

~ Amanda

 

I can’t wait to read what you come up with this month. Don’t forget to link back to this post, and leave a link and comment here so Ineke and Amanda can find your post.

 

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Poetry Tips

  • Write poetry as often as you can.
  • Designate a special notebook (or space in your notebook) for poetry writing.
  • Embrace metaphors but stay away from clichés ( I find this especially difficult!)
  • Don’t be afraid to write a bad poem. You can write a better one later.
  • Don’t back away from your thoughts or feelings. Express them!

 

Poetry Techniques –  Metaphor and Simile

Whilst there are many different styles for writing poetry, you may find one or more works for you. No matter what style or techniques you use, a poem can reach people in ways that other text can’t. It might be abstract or concrete but often it conveys strong emotions. Some common techniques used in poetry are onomatopoeia, alliteration, assonance, rhyming, simile and metaphor. Using metaphor and similes will bring imagery and concrete words into your writing.

The difference between simile and metaphor is explained here:

A metaphor is a statement that pretends one thing is really something else:

Example: “The lead singer is an elusive salamander.”

This phrase does not mean that the lead singer is literally a salamander. Rather, it takes an abstract characteristic of a salamander (elusiveness) and projects it onto the person. By using metaphor to describe the lead singer, the poet creates a much more vivid picture of him/her than if the poet had simply said “The lead singer’s voice is hard to pick out.”

Simile

A simile is a statement where you say one object is similar to another object. Similes use the words “like” or “as.”

Example: “He was curious as a caterpillar” or “He was curious, like a caterpillar”

This phrase takes one quality of a caterpillar and projects it onto a person. It is an easy way to attach concrete images to feelings and character traits that might usually be described with abstract words.

[Credit: Relo Pakistan]

Note: A simile is not any better or worse than a metaphor. The point to remember is that comparison, inference, and suggestion are all important tools of poetry; similes and metaphors are merely one of the tools in your poetry writing toolbox that will help.

Somethingto PonderAbout

Amanda ~

Something to Ponder About

 

Poetry Challenge and Entries for March

Cylinders Beach Stradbroke Island

Fellow blogger and writer from New Zealand, Ineke from scrapydo2.wordpress.com and myself, Amanda from Something to Ponder About, are jointly hosting a poetry challenge in English and in Afrikaans, in the WordPress community.

The challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will run from March to October, 2018.  We will share tips, offer a monthly prompt and post link backs to your published Poetry posts.

Below are links and snippets of March’s wonderful Poetry entries. If I’ve missed anything, or anyone, please let me know. Pingbacks have been known to fail, so it is always helpful if you leave a comment on this post, to flag that you are joining in with the challenge.

 

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Poetry Entries for March

Take a trip through Poetry around the World. Browsing the entries will take you to Australia, South Africa, Slovenia, Denmark, India and Pakistan to read this month’s contributions to the A and I Bilingual Poetry Challenge.

  1. Ineke’s poem whispers in the mist – scrapydo2.wordpress.com
  2. Hester has written a beautiful Haiku of transient moments – hesterleynel.co.za
  3. Gerard from oosterman.wordpress.com/  writes about politics and war. You will find it posted in the comments of my challenge poetry challenge post.
  4. Eliza gave us a lovely reminder to be more accepting of our dearest ones – anitaelise.com/
  5. Amanda has a different take on friendship in hard times – wordpress.com/post/penpunt.wordpress.com
  6. Manja celebrated World Poetry Day with a poem about belonging and love –manjameximovie3.wordpress.com
  7. My contribution is about the potentials in life  – forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com
  8. For a young poet, Tanya has some salient words for everyone – https://pandapoet96.wordpress.com/
  9. Melvin tells us about the way surprising strength in everyday things –  https://melvinoommen.wordpress.com/2018/03/18/it-was/

 

“You told me not to be sad three times.

Does sea-sick mean to be sick of the sea?” – ManjaMexi

 

Would you like to join in this month?

  • Write and post a poem in any language you wish, during the month of April, adding the Tag: A and I Poetry Challenge to your post.
  • Leave a comment on Amanda’s and Ineke’s blog letting us know you are participating.
  • Please link back to this post, so we can find your entry.
  • The topic can be one of your choosing, however if you want to try a fun prompt, the suggestion for April will be posted on Something to Ponder About,  tomorrow, Monday 2nd April, 2018.

     

    Remember, you do not have to use this prompt, at all. The prompt is only there if you feel you want a topic to work from, or you find it hard to come up with an initial idea.

     

    A and I Poetry Challenge
    Ineke and I have created the above logo for the Poetry Challenge and you are very welcome to paste this onto your blog post or sidebar, so that others can also find out about the challenge, if you so wish.

    That is it!

    Oh and have fun writing!!

    N.B. Ineke and I will post link backs to the blogs who have joined in with the challenge in the poetry challenge post in the following month, so that you can all find each other’s blog posts and build a new poet’s community!

    Let us build a Poetry Community in WordPress.

    And if you haven’t had enough poetry yet, there is NaPoWriMo 

    StPA

    Something to ponder about

     

     
     
     

Upcoming Poetry Challenge for Beginner Poets

Writing poetry is something everyone can do, because you can’t really ever get it wrong.

Poetry is just your own thoughts down on paper, so how can that be wrong?

Poetry writing can be a great way to express deep-seated emotions in a constructive way, helping us to process their inner meanings and significance. Then again, your poetry might just be a little bit of fun. Rhyming poetry is an example of this.

Hosts Amanda and Ineke

Fellow blogger and writer from New Zealand, Ineke from scrapydo2.wordpress.com and myself, Amanda from Something to Ponder About , are jointly hosting an upcoming poetry challenge in English and in Afrikaans, in the WordPress community.

I invite you to join in.

 

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Writer Andrea Heiberg

 

Why?

I have my reasons for running this challenge. The first poetry challenge I ever joined was hosted by Andrea Heiberg, a teacher friend in Denmark and her colleague in America and involved an Adult and Child poetry writing challenge which you can still find here.

There was around six groups participate, from all over the world. It was a lot of fun to see what each couple came up, with each week, as well as how they improved throughout the course of the challenge. It was definitely a learning experience for all.

Sadly, Andrea Heiberg passed away last year from Cancer and I know that she would have been absolutely thrilled to see me instigating a new Poetry challenge. So, first and foremost, this poetry challenge honours her as a writer. Secondly because it is fun to write and it builds a community. I hope it will inspire you to join in.

 

When will the Challenge start?

The Poetry challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers, and will run from March to October in 2018.

You can write in any language, it certainly doesn’t have to be in English.

Ineke will post the challenge in Afrikaans on her blog, so if that language suits you better, visit her here. See instructions on joining below.

 

How the Poetry Challenge Works    

On the first week of each month, Ineke and I will publish a challenge post which asks you to write a poem based on the prompt supplied,  or your own idea. We will include links to helpful sites and tips for poetry writing. There will be a poetry prompt for each month that the challenge runs.

Remember, you do not have to use this prompt, at all. The prompt is only there if you feel you want a topic to work from, or you find it hard to come up with an initial idea.

 

A and I Poetry Challenge .jpg
Ineke and I have created the above logo for the Poetry Challenge and you are very welcome to paste this onto your blog post or sidebar, so that others can also find out about the challenge, if you so wish.

 Join the Challenge!

The challenge will commence in March and run for six months.

One post and one prompt per month.

Join in for one or all months, as you like.

Instructions :

  • Sign up by leaving a comment here so we know you are interested in participating.
  • Ineke and I will post a poetry prompt and writing tips and links, around 1st day of each month. You might need to follow our blogs so that the posts show up in your WP reader.
  • Using the monthly Poetry prompt supplied, or your own idea, write a post with a poem, either fun or serious.,
  • So that we can see when you post for the poetry challenge, don’t forget to include a link or pingback to  scrapydo2.wordpress.com and Amanda’s blog, Something to Ponder About  and the tag A and I Poetry Challenge.
  • Include the Poetry Challenge badge in your post, if you so wish. (optional)
  • Leave a comment at Ineke’s blog, scrapydo2.wordpress.com and Amanda’s blog, Something to Ponder About, with a link to your blog post on the Poetry challenge post for that month. If you do this, others can find their way to your challenge post and join in the community too.

That is it!

Oh and have fun writing!!

N.B. Ineke and I will post link backs to the blogs who have joined in with the challenge in the poetry challenge post in the following month, so that you can all find each other’s blog posts and build a new poet’s community!!

Here is an initial link that you might find useful if you are looking for rhyming words.

If you have any questions, please just ask us.

I will post the first prompt this coming week.

Poetry – Something thoughtful to Ponder About

A and I Poetry Challenge

The Gnawing

Sweden norway border fjell på grensen

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The Gnawing 

It’s there in the belly, it sits like a stone,

hard, heavy and dragging them down.

Gnawing in waves, tearing, grating, chewing,

Life imploding, no hope of renewing.

A breaking soul shattered to pieces,

like a mirror smashed by a rock, the light now ceases.

Disintegration.

No going forward, nor even going back.

So continue to clutch that unpredictable track.

It’s over too soon, and yet all seems so far,

Such destinations are never reachable by car.

Blow upon blow, a mind in torture,

The heart rent sore, bent beyond rupture.

And still the Gnawing is there, the closest companion in the darkness.

 

StPA