Friendly Friday Photo Challenge – Chair

alone

We all use them.

Functional, practical, comfy, sometimes stylish.

Who invented the chair?

The ancient Egyptians are believed to be the first to invent a four-legged seat with a back,… The earliest examples have been found in tombs dating as far back as 2680 B.C”

The most common theories are that the chair was an outgrowth of indigenous Chinese furniture, that it evolved from a camp stool imported from Central Asia, that it was introduced to China by Nestorian missionaries in the seventh century, and that the chair came to China from India.

Here are some of my favourites.

You will find this photo challenge is alternately hosted each Friday by the bloggers:
Something to Ponder About  and The Snow Melts Somewhere

Thanks to Snow for this week’s excellent prompt for Friendly Friday. I’ll be back next week with a new prompt. Be sure to check out all this week’s participants linked in the comments section on Snow ‘s blog.

Something to Ponder About

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Friendly Friday Photo Challenge – Alleys

Alley

This photo challenge is alternately hosted each Friday by the bloggers:
Something to Ponder About  and The Snow Melts Somewhere

The prompt for this Friday is:

Alleys

Everyone is welcome to join in with the Friendly Friday Photography challenge.

Here are some alleys in the lakes district of Italy.

Alleys are found not just in the old world. The ‘New’ world has its alleyways too.

Melbourne’s streets was created in a grid like pattern of both wide streets and narrow alleys, as the authorities couldn’t agree on the sort of town plan they initially wanted, for the city: whether to make it more European like, or with modern wider streets, so they hedged their bets and incorporated both.

In Sweden, we have some unique alleys to showcase to visitors.

Both on the West coast and in Stockholm.

I chuckle to think how Manja Mexi would caption this photo?

Instructions for Joining In:

  • Write and publish a post and include the URL link back to this Friendly Friday post.
  • Tag the post ‘Friendly Friday’
  • Include the Friendly Friday logo, found below, in your post if you wish.
  • Copy the link to your ‘Alleys‘ post, in the comments here, so we can find you.
  • Please note there are no deadlines for participating. New prompts each week.
  • Be a part of the Friendly Friday Community and visit the links in the comments section. It can be quite interesting to see another interpretation of the prompt.

Find more Instructions on joining in with Friendly Friday here

Friendly Friday

Pingbacks – Do you help creating a link back or pingback to your post – click here

See you at Snow’s blog next week for the new prompt.

Amanda

Friendly Friday Photo Challenge – Inspiration

Inspiration

As it is the start of a brand new Photography Challenge –
Friendly Friday , the one that I am co-hosting with Snow, from
TheSnowMeltsSomewhere, I felt compelled and indeed, wished, to join in!

Here is my photo depicting Inspiration; the prompt for this week.

It was hard to choose a photo for the theme Inspiration, but I feel that this work by Jasmine Kay Uy for her University of Texas at Austin Department of Art and Art History most inspiring.

How clever are the words? I also love the different interpretations and that one side is hidden from the other given two totally different meanings, depending on one’s orientation and perspective! Sort of like life can be, sometimes?

Instructions on Joining Friendly Friday

Friendly Friday will be posting each Friday – alternately between Snow’s blog TheSnowMeltsSomewhere and my blog Something to Ponder About

Each Friday, we’ll post a prompt and invite you to leave your response in the comments section.

You write a post, publish a photo and leave a hyperlink or pingback in the comments section directing us to your Friendly Friday blog post.

How we will find your post and how to post a linkback or pingback

If you are not sure what a hyperlink, link back or pingback is, it is how we find your blog post in the world wide web.

Just highlight, right click and “copy” the url of your PUBLISHED blog post [see below] that you want to link to, and then paste this along with your comment, on Amanda’s or Snow’s Friendly Friday Blog post, depending on who is hosting the challenge that week, in the same way you would post a normal comment to their post.

A url is the computer’s blog post address that you find at the top of the blog post itself. It should look something like this format but with your blog and post name inserted.

https://xxxx [blogname]/2019/01/06/xxx[name of blog post]/

More info on pingbacks

Tags

If you are really keen it would be fantastic to include in your post a Friendly Friday tag.

To do so, add the words Friendly Friday to the tags in your publishing settings on the side bar, before you hit ‘publish’. You might even want to add a hyperlink or link back to the host blogger’s blog – here is how to do that:

Firstly, Highlight, and right click the url for the host blog – https://forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com https://forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com – for Amanda’s blog

or https://thesnowmeltssomewhere.wordpress.com – for Snow’s blog

Secondly, paste this url in the draft post, by clicking on the chain link icon in your editor, (usually next to BOLD and Italic icons). A text box will pop up – and this is when you right click, paste or ctrl V. Press Enter and your link is then automated. if it works the text colour will change! Any problems, just ask for help!

Oh and if you happen to paste the wrong link, by mistake, just highlight and click the chain link icon again in your editor and the link disappears! Easy.

Created with Adobe Spark

Good luck and Have a Happy Week. Do stop by for my first Friendly Friday Post and a new theme – this Friday 8pm [ Australian time]


Traditional Art – Buddhist Thangka

 

Very likely one of the oldest Buddist symbols, the Wheel of Life is a popular theme in traditional Tibetan Buddhist art and it is known as the Thangka. Historically this highly skilled art form is commissioned for both spiritual and mundane matters, such as aiding the sick,  or to gain merit during commemoration of religious events.

At one time, Buddhist monks used to draw beautiful and complex mandalas on the ground, using colored sand. Once the Mandala was completed, it was removed as conclusion of the ritual, a strong symbol of the impermanence of reality.

 

patan Temple Katmandu

 

 

 

 

One of our treasured artistic possessions from a trip to Bhaktapur, in Nepal, is a Tibetan Buddhist Thankgka painted on silk, pictured below.

 

Buudhist art Apologies for the reflection on the image.

 

Thangkas are painted by the monks themselves, and the art form demands great mastery over drawing, as well as a high understanding of the geometric and iconographic principles within this style of traditional art.

Lamas and pilgrims would carry them in ceremonial processions and Thangkas were hung in monasteries as a way to display Buddhist teachings, in pictorial form.

Certain pictorial elements are outlined in 24 carat gold and are still considered an important method for studying and preserving the religion, history, culture and traditions of the Himalyan countries of Tibet, India and Nepal.

Here you can see the painstaking and long hours needed to produce this work of art:
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YyptY72-rk]

What do the Symbols Mean?

This art form is highly formalized typically seen as four or five concentric rings, or their symbolic equivalents, depicting the realms of existence associated with the journey towards enlightenment.

 

  • In the central ring, you will often find the intertwined images of a pig, a rooster, and a snake which symbolically depict the three “kleshas,” (mental states affecting actions), being ignorance, greed and aggression, called Samsara. These three states characterize the world of suffering and dissatisfaction.The snake and bird can be seen coming out of the mouth of the pig, indicating that anger and attachment arise from ignorance. At the same time the snake and the bird grasp the tail of the pig, indicating that they both promote even greater ignorance.

 

  • Half of the second ring depicts light, showing contented people moving upwards to higher states, possibly to the higher realms whilst the remaining half-circle, (usually dark), shows people in a miserable state being led downwards to lower states, or realms. These images represent karma, the law of cause and effect. The light half-circle indicates people experiencing the results of positive actions, the dark indicating negative action.

Propelled by their karma, beings take rebirth in the six realms of Samsara, as shown in the next ring.

 

  • The outer rim of the wheel is often divided into twelve section.  Whilst the three inner layers display the three poisons that lead to karma, and the suffering of the six realms, the twelve links in the outer rim show how this can happen. This is reference to cause and effect, or karma, over several lifetimes, demonstrating our current life and how our past lives and our present action influence us and our future.
  • The outer area contains decorative floral motifs and mythical animals, which were elements introduced into Buddhist painting in the mid – twentieth century by Newar artists of the Kathmandu valley.

 

 

  • Surrounding the wheel is either Mara, the fearsome demon who tempted Buddha, or Lord ‘Yama’, the Lord of Death, with his tiger skin hanging beneath the wheel, (indicating fearsome- ness), and it is he, who holds the wheel of life in his hands. Regardless of which figure is depicted, it represents impermanence and the transient nature of existence; everything within this wheel is constantly changing. The four limbs, (that clutch the wheel) symbolize the sufferings of birth, old age, sickness, and death.

By contemplating on the twelve sections of the outer ring, one gains greater insight into karma and this insight enables us to begin to unravel our habitual way of thinking and reacting.

  • The twelve outer sections, paired with their corresponding symbols, are:

lack of knowledgea blind person, often walking, or a person peering out

constructive volitional activitya potter shaping a vessel or vessels

consciousnessa man or a monkey grasping a fruit

name and form (constituent elements of mental and physical existence) – two men afloat in a boat

six senses (eye, ear, nose, tongue, body, and mind) – a dwelling with six windows

contactlovers consorting, kissing, or entwined

painan arrow to the eye

thirsta drinker receiving drink

graspinga man or a monkey picking fruit

coming to bea couple engaged in intercourse, a standing, leaping, or reflective person***

being bornwoman giving birth

old age and deathcorpse being carried

*** The images of the couple lying together in a sexual union, we were told, was never intended to be pornographic, but rather to excite and increase the potency of fertility, especially for males! Devotees consider all creation begins with the sacred union of male and female energies. To experience the pure creative passion between man and woman they believe; to know unconditional love, is to manifest the body, mind, and spirit of a Buddha.

Something traditional to Ponder About

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

Proverbs and sayings provide us wise words from all corners of the world whose subtext is a moral lesson or statement. 

Best savoured a little at a time, these sayings are often handed down from generation to generation.

Each Friday, I post a saying, or proverb and a quote that I find thought-provoking. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

 

An American Indian Proverb this week that seems self-explanatory: –

 

 

 

Every accomplishment begins with the decision to TRY. Therefore, must we also, at this point, decide to be brave?

Or does the desire to be thought of as brave come later?

 

 

P1050912

 

There is little need for me to introduce the author of the quote, for this week. Perhaps you did not know that Ernest Hemingway talked about the FBI spying on him later in life. He was treated with electroshock.

It was later revealed that Hemingway was in fact watched, and Edgar Hoover had him placed under surveillance. Perhaps, in light of this, the following Hemingway quote is particularly apt.

 

 

Ron Mueck
Ron Mueck Figures

When people talk, listen completely. Most people never listen.”

– Ernest Hemingway

 

What do you make of the quotes?

Do you find many people don’t listen fully to what is said?

What factors influence whether they listen or not?

 

Some Wisdom to Ponder About this Friday*Blog

Now posting on Fridays*