Monday Mystery Photo – Last time Barcelona

Every second Monday, I post a photo of a ‘mystery’ location, and sometimes a mystery object. 

I invite you to leave a comment if you think you know the location, or what the mystery object might be.

The Mystery photo this week comes from Ineke from the blog Iscrap2. 

 

Ineke 1

Many thanks to Ineke for the use of her photo, which is also the feature logo for our joint Poetry Challenge which you are welcome to join and can read about here.

Ineke and I are jointly hosting the challenge from March until August on our respective blogs. We would love for you to join in.

Can you guess the location?

If you do guess correctly, I will link back to your blog in the follow up post, when the answer is revealed.

 

Comments will be released in the intervening Monday (Australian E.S.T.), so as not to spoil the fun for latecomers. If you have a travel photo, you would like featured on Monday Mystery, please leave a comment or contact me on my email which you will find on the Contact page. You can find my email by hovering over my Gravatar and viewing my Profile information.

 

Previous Monday Mystery Photo

 

Lorelle1

The photograph from the previous Monday Mystery Post, which you’ll find here, comes from Lorelle of the blog,  A Mindful Traveller.

Lorelle tells me it is in Parke Guell, in Barcelona, Spain. It is one of Antoni Gaudi’s famous works. Did you guess correctly?

These bloggers did. Well done, people.

ledrakenoir.wordpress.com/

leggypeggy.com/

chiefwritingwolf.com/

thesnowmeltssomewhere.wordpress.com/

 

Something to Ponder About

 

 

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Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

Proverbs and sayings provide us wise words from all corners of the world whose subtext is a moral lesson or statement. 

Best savoured a little at a time, these sayings are often handed down from generation to generation.

Each Friday, I post a saying, or proverb and a quote that I find thought-provoking. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

 

An American Indian Proverb this week that seems self-explanatory: –

 

 

 

Every accomplishment begins with the decision to TRY. Therefore, must we also, at this point, decide to be brave?

Or does the desire to be thought of as brave come later?

 

 

P1050912

 

There is little need for me to introduce the author of the quote, for this week. Perhaps you did not know that Ernest Hemingway talked about the FBI spying on him later in life. He was treated with electroshock.

It was later revealed that Hemingway was in fact watched, and Edgar Hoover had him placed under surveillance. Perhaps, in light of this, the following Hemingway quote is particularly apt.

 

 

Ron Mueck
Ron Mueck Figures

When people talk, listen completely. Most people never listen.”

– Ernest Hemingway

 

What do you make of the quotes?

Do you find many people don’t listen fully to what is said?

What factors influence whether they listen or not?

 

Some Wisdom to Ponder About this Friday*Blog

Now posting on Fridays*

What is the Art of the People?

Our identity is rooted in our history and icons from each person’s cultural heritage. Folk art, or the art of the people, comprises one aspect of this cultural heritage. But if folk art represents our history, then this must be constantly evolving and accumulating, with each passing year? It can not, by its nature, be static. As time marches on, so must our cultural heritage.

‘Folk art’ encompasses art produced from an indigenous culture, or by peasants, or other laboring tradespeople. In contrast to fine art, folk art is primarily utilitarian and decorative rather than purely aesthetic. – [Wikipedia]

The art of the people or ‘ folk’ represents a moment in time; it talks of what life was, and is, like, for those folk,or people. Is it important to preserve that for future generations?

marimekko

What is today’s cultural heritage or folk art? Traditional artifacts, or everyday objects and memories that are relevant for individual people?slow cooker

Scandinavian festival

“Even though many objects produced today are mass produced consumables, with a short lifespan, they represent an important pillar for our identity.”

[Valdres FolkeMuseum, Fagernes]
IMG_20140914_113038 (Small)

 

Iconic objects that have strong personal or cultural meaning may also comprise folk art and memorabilia of today’s society.

yeahnah

Some objects may represent passion or tell a story, have some aesthetic frame around people’s lives or have some meaning in a cultural sense.

 

Family 2014 017-001

 

What objects would you include in a museum exhibit from this decade?

What object has meaning to you, in today’s society? What could represent your folk art, or cultural heritage from this decade? Is it a photograph, CD, machine, or artwork?

Please share your thoughts.

 

 

 

Try some Traditional Art – Hallingdal Rosemaling

Hallingdal Rosemaling

Norwegian Rosemaling is the style of traditional painting now very popular in America, where it is a favoured style of interior decorating, especially amongst those folk with Scandinavian heritage. Each region, or ‘fylke’, in Norway, developed its own individual interpretation of traditional Rosemaling style and design, which initially appeared back in  the 18th century and even earlier.

Hallingdal style on a cupboard in Geilo

History of Rosemaling

In the 17th century, itinerant painters brought new ideas and artistic trends, from the cities of Europe, into the mountains and Valleys of rural Norway, painting Renaissance and Baroque motifs on the walls of the wooden Norwegian Stave churches. In the Hallingdal, Telemark and Vest Agder provinces, it was their relative geographic isolation that led to further development and evolution, of a peasant folk art form, into a highly distinctive and unique art.  Reaching its zenith in Norway during the 18th century, Rosemaling was then revived by the Norwegian peoples during a fiercely Nationalistic decorating movement in the 19th and 20th centuries, following the country’s political separation from Sweden. Following this, a similar resurgence in Norwegian traditional painting began amongst Norwegian immigrants, living in the American Midwest, in the mid to late 20th century, and this trend continues to flourish there today.

Read more here

Hallingdal style of Rosemaling

The Halling Valley, itself, is situated in an area of southern central Norway, covering towns such as Gol, Ål and Hol and this is where one finds many examples of Hallingdal Rosemaling, appreciated and loved, even today.

Elements of Halling style can be found in the Embroidery on the Norwegian women’s national costume, (called the Bunad), in Norwegian wood carving, on hanging cupboards, and on wooden objects around the Norwegian home.

Features of this Style:

  • Hallingdal Rosemaling colours: rich, varied, exuberant and strong
  • Background colours: red/orange-red, in later years, blue and green
  • Black appeared as a background colour following influences from Telemark
  • Flowers colours: – Blue, White, or Gold on Red grounds; Red and gold on blue/ green backgrounds
  • Early Hallingdal Rosemaling had more floral elements; scrolls were minor. Over time, scrolls became a frame around which the flowers were placed, in order to achieve a sense of balance, either side of the design’s vertical axis. Scrolls still maintained a simplistic form, with little or no shading, and were heavier than the lyrical scrolls seen in the Telemark area
  • Motifs: symmetrical in round/rectangular design shapes, often depicted in mirror image split along the vertical axis
  • Round floral patterns could also be segmented into 4, 6 or 8 divisions, typically with blossoms of four or more petals
  • Leaves: large, often surrounding a central flower,  or mirror image split vertically
  • Design elements are sometimes filled in with fine, cross – hatched lines.
  • Flower shapes of Hallingdal are classified into 3 groups: circles, triangles or half circles.
Claudine Schatz

Circle Flowers

  • A circular centre is painted first and then concentric bands of colour added
  • Petals are added around the central circle in an even number, four or more, with petal length limited by the sectional diameter of the circle, and defined with liner work.
  • Ball flowers are circular flowers painted as a series of round balls surrounding a centre circle.

Triangular Flowers

  • Simple flowers with three petals, similar to a tulip; usually painted in strokes from the outside tip down to a base at the centre.
  • Blooms with more than three petals can have an oval centre, similar to a daisy.  Are  also combined into more elaborate and complex floral designs.
  • Triangular flower petal strokes can double as leaf forms.

Half circle Flowers

  • Usually are seen as larger elements within the Hallingdal design.
  • Comprise a semi-circular band of colour around a base.
  • Adorned with over strokes and details that illuminate the flower in a new way.
  • Half circles can also become petals of a flower form.

Leaves

Two types are seen in Hallingdal Designs

  • Stroke – work leaves, similar to the triangle flower petals
  • Shaded leaves, which are large and heavy and used in conjunction with large round central flowers. They do have some liner work stems.

 

A design by Tore Christiansen

Scrolls

  • Scrolls may represent leaves, but take the form of C and S shapes.
  • They are not shaded or blended in Hallingdal designs.
  • Used as a frame around flowers or as a cartouche border in a band that circles a round floral motif.
  • Painted in one colour; the light source is indicated by over strokes of white/ lighter colour on the top side of the scroll.
  • Scrolls are quite tight. They are not airy and lyrical, as in pieces seen in Telemark regions

Hallingdal Rosemaling even had some features borrowed from Oriental art forms. It was although typical in many ways, also malleable to outside influences. These characteristics overlap and interlace with other Rosemaling styles, and as such, should not be used as limits or boundaries, in one’s own Rosemaling journey, but merely to establish guidelines when one is starting to study this beautiful art form.

Why not get a feel for Hallingdal Rosemaling by painting or colouring in this design:

Free project

Something to Ponder About

 

[Parts of the description of features of Hallingdal style was taken from Rosemaling in the Round by Pat Virch, 1976] 

 

 

Travel Theme – Behind

When I first read the post on Travel theme – Behind, I thought that I’d be hard pressed to find many photos to fit the theme. But then I realized rear facing photos can add another dimension to photography. Here is my list of tips on photography from behind.

My Ten Tips for Photography from Behind

  1. A shot taken from behind can set the tone and be made far more interesting. Some pensive brooding by my daughter, on the Great Ocean Road, Victoria, Australia.

Great ocean RoadWhat was she thinking? She hates road trips, so perhaps it was that, or maybe she was a little bored with the scenery? Surely not! Look at it!

 

2. Sometimes you can get an unexpected shot from behind!

[Take note, this one is for you, Peggy!!]

Rebel computer

3. Sometimes the best angle is found from behind! 

A Street entertainer in Brisbane, Australia.

street performer

4. The mood of a photo can be changed with a posterior shot!

Without the teen standing there, it might have been just another seascape. Instead, it became dramatic and I was concerned for the boy’s safety at at Ballina, Northern NSW.

cliff boy

 

5. A shot focusing behind can draw attention to where you want viewers to look.

Looking down the Floibanen, Bergen, Norway

1403899456269

and direct the eye…

Copenhagen Town hall tower, Denmark

20160704_112022

6. Subjects don’t always need to be looking directly at the camera lens.

Sheep in Golfjellet, Norway

sheep in golfjellet

 

 

7. Sometimes the subject begs to be photographed from behind!

A garden ornament in Whitby, New Zealand

New Zealand 2013 088

 

8. The rear shot can be humorous, enhanced by nature, or man!

No, it wasn’t me who did this!  Vigeland Sculpture Park, Oslo

IMG_8810

 

9. The background behind can emphasize the message you are trying to convey

Art Exhibition by Ron Mueck

 Ron Mueck Exhibition

10. There is also the metaphorical meaning to one’s theme.

Art Exhibition by Ron Mueck

Ron Mueck Exhibition of Sculpture Art

Pondering about something behind one’s back?

 Something to Ponder About