Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

folk art eggs

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures.

They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

 

The proverb this week comes from Poland.

 

Christchurch Cathedral Square

 

 

In a game it’s difficult to know when to stop. ~ Polish Proverb

 

I do believe that there is another layer to the Polish quote. But what is it?

The game of Life? 

Does it refer to our competitive natures? Or the overwhelming desire to win?

 

If indeed that proverb relates to competition, we would do well to remember this saying –

 

“I don’t measure a man’s success by how high he climbs but how high he bounces when he hits bottom.” ~ George S. Patton

 

 

U.S. Army General George Patton earned the nickname Old Blood and Guts and served in both World Wars, so perhaps he had incisive terms of reference, for his quote. 

Do you believe we have an innate ability to spring back from rock bottom, often called in contemporary times: resilience, or, can it be learned through education? 

I would love to hear your thoughts. Join in the discussion by leaving a comment below.

 

 

 

Blog

Now posting on Fridays

Indeed this is something for us to ponder about

~Amanda

 

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A and I Poetry Challenge #3 May

The A and I Poetry challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets.

The challenge runs March to October, 2018. 

Each month we will share tips, offer a monthly poetry prompt and post link backs to your published Poetry posts.

Please scroll down to see this month’s Prompt, guidelines, poetry writing tips and last month’s entrant links.

I am co-hosting this challenge with Ineke from Scrapydo Ineke and I met here on WordPress.If you wish to read the story of how we meet click here.

A and I Poetry Challenge

A and I Poetry Challenge Guidelines

  • For General instructions on joining in, click the Poetry Challenge Page.
  • Everyone is very welcome to enter and age is no barrier.
  • Write any kind of poem that you like, (the below prompt for this month, is merely a suggestion); it can be fun, or serious.
  • Write in any language that pleases you, and note that it certainly doesn’t have to be in English. As this is a joint challenge with Ineke, from Scrapydo2, note that she will also post the challenge in Afrikaans on her blog, so if that language suits you better, visit her here.
  • Add the A and I Poetry badge if you so wish. (optional)
  • Publish the poem on your blog before the 27th day of that month  adding the tag A and I Poetry Challenge to your post.
  • Once you publish your blog post, please leave a comment here on this page and also at Ineke’s blog, here, listing the URL link to YOUR poem.  [Others can then find their way to your  post and we build a supportive community of poets who visit, read and comment on other’s poetry.

**If you don’t post the link to our blogs with your poetry, it is really hard for us to find you and include a linkback to your blog, for the next month’s challenge.


 Poetry Challenge –  May Prompt

 

*Write a poem using this photograph or one of your own as inspiration.

 

N.B. If you choose to use your own photo, please post the photo along with the poem.

 

Here is my submission for this month:

Caught in the Bubble

Bubbles of air, glass and space,
Where’s the herd who grazed this place?

An artist form with eyes a-looking in.
Glass beads reflecting, seeing out, within.

A shrunken, perhaps yes, a distorted view,
Representing and offering a different hue.

Art is crazy, challenging, new,
Breaking barriers, often pushing taboos.

Take a peek and see much more,
Something’s looking back at you, for sure.

~ Amanda

I struggled with the subject matter for this poem, even though it was my own photo.

Apparently the Japanese creator wanted to accentuate the outer husk or shape of the animal by enhancing it with these beads of glass and acrylic.

A Word a Week Challenge - Glitter



Poetry Challenge Entrants for April:

 



Poetry Tips

  • Formatting – Tools to help you format your poems on your blog, including how to add extra lines in your post without WordPress expunging them on posting, can be found here
  • Live your poem. When you write, imagine you are a participant in your poem. Look around. See what’s happening. Feel the texture of the sticky pine cone. Feel how difficult it is to pull your fingers apart to type afterwards. Listen to the sounds around you. A robin? A whippoorwill? A Tasmanian devil? Smell your panic. Taste the dryness on your tongue, the thin salt. Activate all your senses. Galway Kinnell once said, “If you’re going to write about a frog, become that frog. Inhabit frogness.”
  • Don’t think too much, just write it down.
    Ray Bradbury once said, “Throw yourself off a cliff and build your wings on the way down.” Don’t think too much about what I’m going to write. Let the poem create itself. Discover what you are doing in the process of doing it. It evolves as you put pen to paper.
  •  Incorporate poetry devices
    What else can make your poetry shine like the summer sun? Imagery, metaphors, and symbolism-to name just a few poetry devices-are subtle ways to improve your poetry. By adding rhyme, irony, or tone to your work, you create a phoenix from a dead piece of paper.
    Readers enjoy poetry with meaning, that has a beat or an easy flow, and can be secretive but not beyond their understanding. Great poets know exactly how to incorporate the many elements of poetry into their work.
    Research the many poetry devices (others include simile, figurative language, synecdoche, allegories, and musical devices) and begin practicing with them in your own poetry. Write a poem with a theme you enjoy but base it around irony or a metaphor. Continue to practice each device and work them all into different poems to experience each one’s effect.
    You can find many examples and ways to use poetry devices by reading books on the subject or doing a simple search online. Study and learn each device, because you never know when one might work perfectly for what you are trying to write.

 

In a nutshell:

  1. Use poetry devices to give your work substance.
  2. Readers enjoy reading poetry with inner meaning or special attributes.
  3. It takes practice, hard work, and dedication to master devices like Symbolism, Imagery, or Rhyme.
  4. Finding out about each poetry device is easy; just search online or at your local bookstore or library.
[Source Credit: https://forum.rhymezone.com/articles/884-5-tips-for-writing-better-poetry-how-to-jumpstart-your-writing-by-john-bon%5D

 

I can’t wait to read what you come up with this month.

Don’t forget to link back to this post, on your poetry submission post, and leave a link and comment here so Ineke, Amanda and others can find your post.

Have fun!

~ Amanda and Ineke

 

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

Contemplation

 

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

The proverb, I have chosen to examine, this week is not listed as coming from any particular region of the world so that means it must have universal meaning. Right?

 

The dog that quits barking can get some sleep.

~ Traditional Proverb

Does it have universal meaning for you? What do you see as its meaning?

Are we always on alert, like the watch dog? Do we lack sleep or restful down time due to our vigilance? If so, vigilance over what, in particular? Jobs, family, children, religious rituals?

What is the proverb warning us about?

 

 

 

veterans

Gympie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In honour of Australia’s  Anzac Day, I have chosen the following quote:

 

“If I had to take hell.

I would choose the Australians to take it, and the New Zealanders to hold it!”

~ Erwin Rommel

 

 

 

 

wreath veterans

 

However, for those for whom Anzac day holds no significance, there is this quote, in the current series from Ancient Greek philosophers:

 

 

“Reality is created by the mind, we can change our reality by changing our mind.” –Plato

 

 

Is seeing reality really perceiving the truth?

 

 

The message in Plato’s quote, was discussed, somewhat obliquely in the commentary, with blogger Mabel Kwong, last week. You can find it here if you wish to read the back story.

Please join in the discussion by leaving a comment.

Proverbial Friday really giving you Something to Ponder About

 

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

 

Failure is something we all encounter in our lives.

 

 

Failure is simply a step towards success as they wise words relate:

 

Don’t stop sowing just because the birds ate a few seeds. ~ Danish Proverb

 

magpie

 

Accepting its place in your life as a teacher, and moving forward despite failure, is echoed in the same theme:-

 

 

“Falling down is not a failure. Failure comes when you stay where you have fallen.” –Socrates

 

 

 Mary Tyler Moore, a woman ahead of her time told us to :-

“Take chances, make mistakes.  That’s how you grow.  Pain nourishes your courage.  You have to fail in order to practice being brave.”

 

Whilst Marilyn vos Savant reminds us that:-

“Being defeated is often a temporary condition.  Giving up is what makes it permanent.”

 

Several notable figures through history has reinforced that failure is not falling down; failure is staying down when you have the chance to get back up. Then why are we so hell-bent on creating perfection?

Failure just means you have found a way that doesn’t work, and if you get hung up on every failed attempt, you will miss every new opportunity that comes your way.

 

Graffiti 20180105_210459 (2)

 

All failures are just stepping-stones along your journey to success.

 

 

Success 20180105_225131

How do you handle failure?

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment.

 

Proverbial Friday – Something to Ponder Positively About

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

 

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

bear and happy girl

“Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated.”
― Confucius

 

Have you ever been guilty of over-thinking a problem? It is something I think we are all capable of, and the concept of which intrigues me. Why do we opt for the more difficult scenario when a simple solution might rid ourselves of worry? Confucius was surely someone that was solution-focused.

Confucius 20160212_084943

The flip side of complicated situations might however, be seen to be over-clinical or lacking in empathy. It is then we must find a balance between our emotions and that of clear-thinking practicality. The endless battle between our heart and head. Is this one of the underlying messages in the following proverb?

 

Eyes

“Eyes that do not cry, do not see.” ~ Unknown

 

Something to Ponder About this Friday

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