A and I Poetry Challenge – Reminder

Just a reminder that September Poetry contributions close next weekend, September 30.

This month we wrote some Limericks on seasons.

Please post your limerick on your blog, linking your URL to Ineke or Amanda’s blogs to get included in the September roundup and also for other bloggers to read.

For more information on how to participate click Here

Host bloggers are, Amanda  from Australia at

https://forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com/2018/09/02/poetry-challenge-september-prompt/

and Ineke from New Zealand at

https://scrapydo2.wordpress.com/2018/09/22/a-i-poetry-challenge-limerick/

jointly host the challenge.

Ineke mostly does the poetry in Afrikaans, while Amanda uses English.

The challenge is open to all, from first-timers up to well-advanced poets.

The Challenge runs from March to October 2018.

October is the last one for this year. Amanda will put the October Challenge up in the first week of October.

A and I Poetry Challenge

Something poetic to Ponder About

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Monday Mystery Photo – Last time Western Australia

Every second Monday, I post a photo of a ‘mystery’ location, and sometimes a mystery object.  I invite you to leave a comment if you think you know the location, or what the mystery object might be. If you guess correctly, I will link back to your blog in the follow-up post, when the answer is revealed. Comments will be released on alternate Mondays (Australian E.S.T.), so as not to spoil the fun for late-comers to this post.

N.B. If you have a travel photo you would like featured on Monday Mystery, please leave a comment  below, or contact me by email, [find this at my Gravatar and Profile info].

The mystery photo, this time, comes from Restless Jo, more widely known for her weekly post linking Monday Walks from around the world.

Do you know the location of Jo’s Mystery Photo, shown below?

Jo Restless jo photo for MMP IMG_8984




Previous Monday Mystery Photo

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My dear friend, Allison’s mystery photo depicted The Pinnacles, an unusual desert with rock formation north of Perth, in Western Australia.

Some thought they were termite mounds but these ancient limestone pillars, called The Pinnacles, are several metres tall. They’re scattered across the desert in Western Australia, North of Perth, in their thousands, creating an eerie, alien-like landscape. Some are as high as three and half metres, and some finish in a jagged point, while others have rounded domes, resembling tombstones. Made up of shells, the Pinnacles date back millions of years to an epoch when the sand was beneath the sea. Read more about this location here.

Correct answers for MMP, came from the following bloggers:

Toortsie.com/

Chris from lifeofrileyow.com/

and Lorelle and Christine who correctly guessed Australia

Well done! That wasn’t an easy location!

MMP – Monday Mystery Photo – Something mysterious to Ponder About

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Poetry Writing tips and Challenge for April

A and I Poetry Challenge

The A and I Poetry challenge is jointly hosted by Amanda and Ineke and is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will run from March to October, 2018.  We will share tips, offer a monthly prompt and post link backs to your published Poetry posts.

Please scroll down to see April’s poetry writing tips.

Instructions for joining are on the Poetry Challenge Page. You are very welcome to enter.

You can write any kind of poem that you like, as the prompt is merely a suggestion. Write in any language you like; it certainly doesn’t have to be in English. As this is a joint challenge with Ineke, she will also post the challenge in Afrikaans on her blog, so if that language suits you better, visit her here.

N.B. Please leave a comment here if you wish to be included in the Ping backs for this month.

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Poetry Challenge – April Prompt:

Write a poem that begins with the last thing you can remember someone saying to you yesterday. So if you can use that line two to three times throughout your poem.

 

Here is my Poem for April, inspired by Anie, who is one of my lovely readers: –

raindrops

 

Anie’s Rain

Like raindrops falling on to glass, I can not fight this force

that propels me forward to the end.

Like raindrops falling on to glass, it is fruitless to fight

what I cannot control.

Like raindrops falling on to glass, each journey individual, different from another.

Some hurry, sliding past, more sort of slow and steady,

one might falter at the start, coalesce or lose identity in groups,

Softly seductive, their lifetime short, imprint merely temporary,

All one substance.

One end.

~ Amanda

 

I can’t wait to read what you come up with this month. Don’t forget to link back to this post, on your poetry submission post, and leave a link and comment here so Ineke, Amanda and others can find your post.

 

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Poetry Tips

  • Write poetry as often as you can.
  • Designate a special notebook (or space in your notebook) for poetry writing.
  • Embrace metaphors but stay away from clichés ( I find this especially difficult!)
  • Don’t be afraid to write a bad poem. You can write a better one later.
  • Don’t back away from your thoughts or feelings. Express them!

 

Poetry Techniques –  Metaphor and Simile

Whilst there are many different styles for writing poetry, you may find one or more works for you. No matter what style or techniques you use, a poem can reach people in ways that other text can’t. It might be abstract or concrete but often it conveys strong emotions. Some common techniques used in poetry are onomatopoeia, alliteration, assonance, rhyming, simile and metaphor. Using metaphor and similes will bring imagery and concrete words into your writing.

The difference between simile and metaphor is explained here:

A metaphor is a statement that pretends one thing is really something else:

Example: “The lead singer is an elusive salamander.”

This phrase does not mean that the lead singer is literally a salamander. Rather, it takes an abstract characteristic of a salamander (elusiveness) and projects it onto the person. By using metaphor to describe the lead singer, the poet creates a much more vivid picture of him/her than if the poet had simply said “The lead singer’s voice is hard to pick out.”

Simile

A simile is a statement where you say one object is similar to another object. Similes use the words “like” or “as.”

Example: “He was curious as a caterpillar” or “He was curious, like a caterpillar”

This phrase takes one quality of a caterpillar and projects it onto a person. It is an easy way to attach concrete images to feelings and character traits that might usually be described with abstract words.

[Credit: Relo Pakistan]

Note: A simile is not any better or worse than a metaphor. The point to remember is that comparison, inference, and suggestion are all important tools of poetry; similes and metaphors are merely one of the tools in your poetry writing toolbox that will help.

Somethingto PonderAbout

Amanda ~

Something to Ponder About

 

Poetry Challenge and Entries for March

Cylinders Beach Stradbroke Island

Fellow blogger and writer from New Zealand, Ineke from scrapydo2.wordpress.com and myself, Amanda from Something to Ponder About, are jointly hosting a poetry challenge in English and in Afrikaans, in the WordPress community.

The challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will run from March to October, 2018.  We will share tips, offer a monthly prompt and post link backs to your published Poetry posts.

Below are links and snippets of March’s wonderful Poetry entries. If I’ve missed anything, or anyone, please let me know. Pingbacks have been known to fail, so it is always helpful if you leave a comment on this post, to flag that you are joining in with the challenge.

 

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Poetry Entries for March

Take a trip through Poetry around the World. Browsing the entries will take you to Australia, South Africa, Slovenia, Denmark, India and Pakistan to read this month’s contributions to the A and I Bilingual Poetry Challenge.

  1. Ineke’s poem whispers in the mist – scrapydo2.wordpress.com
  2. Hester has written a beautiful Haiku of transient moments – hesterleynel.co.za
  3. Gerard from oosterman.wordpress.com/  writes about politics and war. You will find it posted in the comments of my challenge poetry challenge post.
  4. Eliza gave us a lovely reminder to be more accepting of our dearest ones – anitaelise.com/
  5. Amanda has a different take on friendship in hard times – wordpress.com/post/penpunt.wordpress.com
  6. Manja celebrated World Poetry Day with a poem about belonging and love –manjameximovie3.wordpress.com
  7. My contribution is about the potentials in life  – forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com
  8. For a young poet, Tanya has some salient words for everyone – https://pandapoet96.wordpress.com/
  9. Melvin tells us about the way surprising strength in everyday things –  https://melvinoommen.wordpress.com/2018/03/18/it-was/

 

“You told me not to be sad three times.

Does sea-sick mean to be sick of the sea?” – ManjaMexi

 

Would you like to join in this month?

  • Write and post a poem in any language you wish, during the month of April, adding the Tag: A and I Poetry Challenge to your post.
  • Leave a comment on Amanda’s and Ineke’s blog letting us know you are participating.
  • Please link back to this post, so we can find your entry.
  • The topic can be one of your choosing, however if you want to try a fun prompt, the suggestion for April will be posted on Something to Ponder About,  tomorrow, Monday 2nd April, 2018.

     

    Remember, you do not have to use this prompt, at all. The prompt is only there if you feel you want a topic to work from, or you find it hard to come up with an initial idea.

     

    A and I Poetry Challenge
    Ineke and I have created the above logo for the Poetry Challenge and you are very welcome to paste this onto your blog post or sidebar, so that others can also find out about the challenge, if you so wish.

    That is it!

    Oh and have fun writing!!

    N.B. Ineke and I will post link backs to the blogs who have joined in with the challenge in the poetry challenge post in the following month, so that you can all find each other’s blog posts and build a new poet’s community!

    Let us build a Poetry Community in WordPress.

    And if you haven’t had enough poetry yet, there is NaPoWriMo 

    StPA

    Something to ponder about

     

     
     
     

‘Moore’ Meanderings at Linville

Being a winter girl, a summer drive through Australia’s back roads isn’t always pleasant for me, living as I do in a humid sub-tropical part of the globe, but I have to admit I discovered the Linville – Moore region of the Esk county, in Southern Queensland did have a particular provincial charm.

Linville, itself, boasts a Pub and a general store, in addition to a camping ground and a vague attempt at a historic railway exhibit, but this too simply adds to the relaxing country appeal of a laid back rural lifestyle.

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Historic Linville Hotel

Situated a 90 minute drive, north west from Brisbane, the Esk shire had a rich history of timber getting and cattle grazing. Veteran soldiers returning from World War I established small dairy farms in the surrounding areas, many of which have folded, following the deregulation of the dairy industry in the late 20th century.

In 1910, the Brisbane Valley railway line was extended to Linville, from Toogoolawah. It must have been a big event when the railway branch line opened and dignitaries boarded the train that took them from here to the Pinkenba docks in Brisbane, 140 kilometres away.

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The golden times have long gone for this small country town. The rail line was closed in the 1950’s and the station has suffered the ravages of time and neglect.

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The station master’s office contains several historic photos and memorabilia, but unfortunately it was locked when we visited and we could only peer inside through the window.
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The railway carriages are unlocked and free to enter, but as charming as they are, they too, are in complete disrepair. They might just be awaiting a philanthropic entrepreneur to renovate them into a fashionable Air B &B?

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Looking inside you can get a taste of rail travel of yesteryear. Beautiful leather seats and ornate plaster ceilings must have made for a luxurious alternative to a Horse and Jinker.

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The old rails has now been removed but the track itself remains now as a cleared, cycle or walking path. Cyclists can access a level 23 km run north to the town of Blackbutt but those on foot can take the path in the opposite direction of 7 kilometres to nearby ‘Moore’ township.

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The major waterway in the area, the Brisbane river, follows parts of the track, as it begins its winding course, meandering its way to Brisbane proper, finally spilling out into the sea, at Moreton Bay.

Due to recent good summer rainfalls, the vehicular causeway over the river was only just passable.

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Before leaving Linville, you might enjoy 100 years of history over a meal of very decent pub grub, moderately priced at around $15 for a Burger with chips.

Word has it that you can even stay the night at the historical pub, if you wish.

 

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Accommodation at the Linville Hotel will set you back $40, a night, if you chose to linger longer. Nighttime entertainment includes a game of pool, playing the piano or checking out the unique jukebox.

Or perhaps take in some more refreshments in the bar with the locals. Yes that label is fair dinkum!! Don’t let the chainsaw or the Port’s label, put you off!

 

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MOORE

Strolling down the ex-railway track for  seven kilometres, you will arrive at the town of Moore. In the main street you will find a lovely gallery cafe.

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The Old Church Gallery on Linville Road has a friendly buzz is evident with the owner operator enthusiastically welcoming visitors to her garden verandah cafe.

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The  menu for Lunch is centred on organic healthy cuisine, such as Cauliflower salad and Zucchini soup. There is plunger coffee, served individually to your table, according to taste, as well as infusions of loose leaf tea, and mouth-watering home made cakes, served with custard and figs, at prices that won’t blow your budget.

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Plus you will find many interesting curios and artifacts from bygone times.

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Home to Mackenzie fabrics, the adjoining Gallery contains a diverse range of arts, crafts, gifts and jewellery at moderate prices.

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The Old Church Gallery is located at 35 Linville Road, Moore and is open from 11 am – 4pm, Thursday to Sunday, and will happily caters for Groups. Word has it a craft group has started up in Linville and they will also meet up at the cafe.

Access for disabled and Dogs are welcome in the courtyard. Always a bonus for dog lovers.

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Moore and Linville’s Heritage Railway Walking trail make a delightful day trip to Ponder About and most suitable for Jo’s Monday Walks

Thanks goes to Ben and Nina for introducing us to the Linville area.