Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

Sun Tzu was a military strategist, writer and philosopher in Ancient China. Some believe his writings are essential in understanding Chinese  political motivations and expansion, in modern times.  But does Sun Tzu’s proverbs have meaning for us in our  present day lives? What, if anything can we learn from this quote? What do you think about opportunities? Do you create your own or are you merely a passive agent?

“Opportunities multiply as they are seized.”

-Sun Tzu

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The quote this week comes from another historical figure; this time from the West. Battling the hierarchical medical and military fraternity of her time,  and for that she must have had intelligence, determination, and perseverance.

This is what Florence Nightingale had to say of her achievements: –

“I attribute my success to this: I never gave or took any excuse.”

– Florence Nightingale

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Is there a lesson in this, for us? What do you think?

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment below.

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Proverbial Friday – Something thought provoking to Ponder About

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Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too and join with me in a discussion on what we can learn.

The proverb and quotes this week focus on environmental concerns.

 

 

I conceive that the land belongs to a vast family of which many are dead, few are living, and countless numbers are still unborn

– Nigerian Chief

A nation that destroys its soils destroys itself. - Franklin D Roosevelt #eco (Find more green quotes on SustainableBabySteps.com)

 

Source: www.sustainablebabysteps.com

 

The activist is not the man who says the river is dirty. The activist is the man who cleans up the river

– Ross Perot

 

and a final quote this week:

Problems cannot be solved at the same level of awareness that created them

– Albert Einstein

 

 

 

 

The Nigerian Chief recognized that we can never truly own the land. We are merely transient tenants. Inherent in this saying, is the understanding of the mortality of ourselves and of our planet.

Of environmental problems, can they be solved by increasing and augmenting awareness? Or can one team or sector of society make a difference? I think it needs to be a cooperative, collaborative team effort. A problem tackled by all, and for all, ages. Yet, in our our little corner of space, we can change the world for the better. But, if we heed Einstein’s quote – can everyone do that?

 

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                  Now posting on Fridays

 

Linking also to the Three day Quote challenge over at Purple Pumpernickel.

Proverbial Friday – Something to Ponder About

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures.

They speak of experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

The doorstep of the palace is very slippery

– Polish Proverb

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“The hardest thing to do is to be true to yourself, especially when everybody is watching.”

-Dave Chappelle

 

Bergen view

 

What do you make of the Polish proverb?

Is it a warning against brown-nosing the elitists or those in authority?   

and as for the Quote this week:

Do you agree with Dave Chapelle? 

I would love to hear your thoughts on this week’s sayings.

Please feel very welcome to join in the discussion, by leaving a comment, below.

 

StPA

 

Linking also to the Three day Quote challenge.

If you wish to join in, check out Purple Pumpernickel for the Rules.

BlogNow posting on Fridays

 

 

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures.

They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

Photo by Flickr on Pexels.com

 

When elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers.

Indian proverb

 

 

 

Photo by shy sol on Pexels.com

 

 

“They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, I told them they didn’t understand life.”

–John Lennon

 

 

 

Feelings are like chemicals, the more you analyze them the worse they smell.

~ Charles Kingsley

 

 

 

Charles Kingsley was a English clergyman, university professor, historian, and novelist, who must have had some strong feelings that greatly disturbed him. I am certain that thinking for too long about something might be a curse, in that one sometimes feels that there’s never a moment of peace, in one’s own mind, from the self-talk.  The memory receptors, in our brain, work by reconstructing events, and with each recall of memory, there appears to be a slight change or enhancement of the memory, so if they are recalled often, they might be far from the reliable truths we regard them to be. More often, we find memories are often peppered with an individual’s own particular bias, rather than a precise itinerary of events.

But the Indian proverb, refers to something completely different, don’t you think?

Or can you see a correlation between quote and proverb?

 

I would love to hear your thoughts.

Please feel very welcome to join in the discussion, by leaving a comment, below.

 

 

 

Linking also to the Three day Quote challenge.

If you wish to join in, check out Purple Pumpernickel for the Rules.

Blog

Now posting on Fridays

Indeed this is something for us to ponder about

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

folk art eggs

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures.

They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

 

The proverb this week comes from Poland.

 

Christchurch Cathedral Square

 

 

In a game it’s difficult to know when to stop. ~ Polish Proverb

 

I do believe that there is another layer to the Polish quote. But what is it?

The game of Life? 

Does it refer to our competitive natures? Or the overwhelming desire to win?

 

If indeed that proverb relates to competition, we would do well to remember this saying –

 

“I don’t measure a man’s success by how high he climbs but how high he bounces when he hits bottom.” ~ George S. Patton

 

 

U.S. Army General George Patton earned the nickname Old Blood and Guts and served in both World Wars, so perhaps he had incisive terms of reference, for his quote. 

Do you believe we have an innate ability to spring back from rock bottom, often called in contemporary times: resilience, or, can it be learned through education? 

I would love to hear your thoughts. Join in the discussion by leaving a comment below.

 

 

 

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Now posting on Fridays

Indeed this is something for us to ponder about

~Amanda