Community

A Photo a Week Challenge: Bridges

gargoyle gate bridge
The Entrance to a Machievellian House, perhaps? Gargoyles adorn the Bridge posts.

It has been a while since I posted a photography post, but I have been chatting to another blogger about hosting a photography challenge recently, so thought I would get back to the swing of posting photography. I will soon be leaving for Japan, so I will sneak in this post.

The Task: SHARE A PHOTO OR TWO OF BRIDGES.

Well, the blogger did ask.

Bridges are a popular motif.

A connection between two worlds.

A fascinating angle for photographers.

I tried to find some different photos in my collection for this challenge.

Mt Cook Merino sheep
A Bridge of Sheep – how often do you see that? 

I like the angle where it looks like the Merlion is hosing the folks on the bridge, and indeed on a humid Singapore day, that spray of cool water is indeed refreshing!

No need to tell you where this is

A rather abstract edited version, which seems to exude atmosphere.

bridge
Walking the underworld of bridges

“A Bridge Too Far” – site of World War II battle over the Rhine and movie with Robert Redford.

John Frost Bridge, Arnhem, The Netherlands

A different type of natural bridge, except the arching rock pathway that led to this natural feature in Australia, completely fell down and left several Japanese tourists stranded on the rock for several hours,  or at least  until the helicopter came and airlifted them to safety.

Australia
London Bridge – true to its namesake, it fell down a few years back 

Read more about the stranded tourists here

Find instructions at Nancy merrill photography, if you would like to join.

Painting

Hindeloopen painting -a Traditional Decorative Art

 
 
 
Hindelooper art is a type of traditional decorative painting originated in the northern province of Friesland, The Netherlands.
 
It is a form of folk art painted by the maritime community of Hinderloopen, (a small town on the Zuiderzee). During times of bad weather when there was no fish to sell, sailors/fisherman would turn to painting as a way to pass the time and make some money.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hindeloopen sailors traded with other Hanseatic league member countries – especially Norway, and often brought home objects painted in other traditional styles that had developed from the Baroque  art, primarily Norwegian Rosemaling.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The presence of these styles in the community, in turn, influenced the development of the Hinderlooper’s own village painting, until it evolved into the Hindeloopen art that we see today. The following pieces are my interpretation of Hindeloopen, inspired by the Australian artist, Heleen Van de Haar.
 
 

HIndeloopen Mangle Tray

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

I have been painting Hindeloopen style of painting and only recently discovered an old family link to Friesland. NO wonder I was attracted to this elegant and very relaxing style of traditional painting.  Traditionally it was the men who did the painting in the village itself, but I so enjoy it. Perhaps the women were so busy with domestic chores they had little time for painting, and it was the men who were stuck ashore in times of bad weather that had time on their hands to create and decorate.

I will include a tutorial on Hindeloopen in the coming months. Something for those interested in traditional art, to ponder about…

Related Articles:

History of Hindeloopen

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