blogging, Community

Why Write a Blog? Is a Blog a Waste of Time?

What happened to storytelling, to having a narrative? One Blogger asked this question in a recent post about the direction of blogging. She’d come across a blogger recommending other bloggers attract more readers by offering their readers useful advice:

…figure out what our unique niche is and paint ourselves as an authority, offering them something every time you ask for something back.

thesnowmeltssomewhere
Photo by Sunsetoned on Pexels.com

List Format Blog Posts and Finding Your Blogging Tribe

Do you write advice posts or entertaining ones? Is the goal, for the reader, to find info that makes life a little easier for them? After all, home hints and time-saving tips are generous, giving and sought after by many. And yet, Snow suggests list style formats are not so dissimilar from TV reality show: repetitive, unoriginal and uninspiring, proposing there just might be,”too many self-proclaimed experts out there.” She’d prefer a blog that is just for entertainment, or storytelling.

Thinking about this, I wondered whether a story is more valuable than a post dispensing advice? I think that might depend on what kind of person the reader is. Perhaps we need both kinds of posts? Sometimes one and sometimes the other. Diversity is a good buzz word for that, isn’t it?

When I want information – the list format of writing a post helps me find salient information faster. However posts titled, ‘The Top Ten Places to See in Europe,’ is a style of post I’d read once, but hardly another in the same vein. It is becoming a trite and hackneyed format, short on meatier content, and meatier content is what I personally seek, as a reader.

Photo by Nataliya Vaitkevich on Pexels.com

It seems that if we want, (or for monetizing bloggers, – need), people to read our blogs, we might write in this way early on in our blogging life, to filter and find our blog tribe; our community; those few like-minded souls who follow us and begin to comment regularly so that a fulsome discussion, or blogging friendship might develop. Without a few of those list style of posts to begin with, how can we build that community so many of us enjoy? Would we still find a tribe of like-minded blog readers another way?

Don’t we want any or all varieties of readers? Diversity dictates that we need differing opinions and readers from all walks of life.

Blogging Stats and SEO

Whilst I don’t read list posts anymore, I do try to use headings when writing a blog post, supposedly it is good SEO. I don’t understand a whole lot about SEO and SEO tips seems to change rapidly. Once upon a time we were told to use 10 tags, for good SEO, now it is not more than 5. It is hard to keep up with so fickle a technological beast.

Are we all getting sucked into looking at stats and levels of engagement? I remember a blogger who posted about getting back to the real reason why she blogged and not looking at stats, or checking for new followers. Great, I thought. To my surprise, she stopped blogging shortly after! I never found out why.

Likes and Comments

I dislike the thought that someone would write to receive likes alone. Fixating on that, to the detriment of our mental health, could render our blogging platform meaningless. You’d do better to mutter a few grudge sentences on Facebook – that will give you ‘likes,’ and save yourself some time.

What would change if I disabled the like button on my posts?

Nothing? Less signs of engagement?

This begs the question: would I still be blogging if I had not received any comments? Perhaps. I hazard a guess I would still write, but not be posting as frequently.

The Blogging Audience

Diarist bloggers who inform about the week that was, without crafting a story, are perhaps still learning to make writing interesting. That level of self-expression, in Marie Kondo style, must bring them joy and could be all they need from writing? We’re all different and we all seek out and write different sorts of posts.

One Blogger [Manja], said she seeks friends in blogging, not an audience. Another thought all bloggers are looking for an audience for without it, they reach no one. This highlights a divide between the intentions of bloggers.

Some bloggers are out to make money and need that audience to do that. That is not always art. Others – those who have an urge to write or tell stories, through photos or words, enjoy their art, interact with their audience and along the way, make friends.

Monetizing a Blog

Am I interested in making money off my blog?

No, not really. If a few dollars come my way, I’d be silly to knock it back, but I also won’t put my focus in this direction and spend time and effort chasing it. Already I am slightly embarrassed about reviewing places for some small kick-back, such as a free sample. I wonder how I can write impartially when I receive a kickback from the thing you are writing about? However, I am told of certain readers that do value and appreciate reading product reviews, so I relent a little and try to tap my inner Buddha and again seek the middle path.

Becoming a Writer

Photo by Suzy Hazelwood on Pexels.com

Many bloggers have the goal to publish a book, but that’s not on my to do list either. I do have a book idea, or two, rather lofty ones, but writing my blog posts with that intention does not form part of the reason I am here.

Writing a blog post feels innate, it’s in my blood. For around four centuries that I know of, there’s been writers in my family, not famous, nor polished, but writers nonetheless. I could say it’s tradition, but my writing doesn’t come from any sense of historical obligation.

For me, writing just happens when the mood hits or I should do so. It might come out as rubbish, but it is my rubbish and not contrived just to receive ‘likes.’ I once tried to write like that and the result was bland and boring.

Writing comes from both my heart and my head. I write when I feel inclined to do so, but more often than not, as I sit at the keyboard, words erupt like the melt water in a glacial stream at Springtime. Words come tumbling and running out, splashing around obstacles in their path, anxious to appear on the computer screen lest they be washed downstream and away, (ie. before I forget what I was intending to say).

Poppy, Hellesylt, Norway

Finding More Readers for a Blog.

But aren’t we skirting around the crux of this issue? If we only write for ourselves and from our hearts and heads, why do we want more exposure and more readers? Only to find more like-minds and interesting conversation via comments? Surely there is more to it, than that?

For me, the reward of blogging is the joy that comes from robust self-expression.

Any friendship that arises, from that, is a bonus and the result of two people connecting. The internet is not constraining of geographic boundaries – connection is what blogging gives back to us.

Fundamentally, I am here to learn, and to express, with a little bit of entertainment thrown in. I might find an interesting blogger to read or follow and if I wasn’t here, I’d miss that opportunity to further my knowledge and discuss topics via the readers’ comments.

Blogging is not wasting anyone’s time, it is the best classroom in the world, and the sky is the limits. I ‘like’ that.

stpa logo

With much thanks to Snow for initiating this post.

378 thoughts on “Why Write a Blog? Is a Blog a Waste of Time?”

    1. My blog is for my personal growth and it is based on the foundation of learning from the past and to be thankful for the present. As I learn to enjoy and value each day with gratitude and kindness, writing is a way for me to pause and reflect; and act on areas where I can keep improving on. It is my hope that by my simple sharing of my life’s journey in my blog, I can bring some joy and inspiration to the hearts of my readers 🌻😊.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I think that blogging and connecting with others allows us to expand as people. We learn and grow in many areas, not just how to minimize or where to vacation, but the heart and soul of people who live and believe differently.

    Liked by 19 people

    1. Expanding, learning and growing are worthwhile goals and I do think that blogging brings that to you. Importantly, Rebecca, you mentioned the heart and soul of people who live differently. Without hearing different opinions and stories, how could we develop our thinking and find that balanced perspective that we all aim for, in life?

      Liked by 12 people

      1. Which is very true. I can’t begin to share how much I have learned over the course of the past few months. I know it has made a difference in my way of thinking and understanding. I realize, I’m not as knowledgeable as I thought.

        Liked by 5 people

        1. We are only as knowledgeable as what is on offer to you in our little corner of the world. That niche might be limiting in certain ways and blogging gives us an opportunity to tap into other opinions and perspectives and in doing so, we DO learn and grow. That is the priceless gift of blogging!

          Liked by 9 people

          1. How right you are. Sitting out here where I live is actually secluded compared to other areas. The learning is limited which is one of the many reasons I enjoy blogging. Because as you said,the learning is one of the priceless gifts.

            Liked by 7 people

            1. Have you always lived away from the city areas, Rebecca? I wonder if you were like I was, when I was young, interested in communicating with others via penfriendships? Many who did that and yearn to connect with the wider world turned to blogging.

              Liked by 7 people

              1. I grew up here in this house. We are close to small town but the biggest isn’t all that far away. I did for a while live in the shadow of Lake Charles, LA. But that was nearly 40 years ago so I’m sure its a different place now. But I did have several penfriendships over the course of time. But I’ve always been writing something since I was able to hold a pencil. Of course up until I learned to actually spell words it mostly appeared to be in some sort of code…

                Liked by 6 people

              1. I’ve been blogging for months now and it has broadened my view as regards to the way I see things now. Making me more enlightened in other niches apart from mine.

                Liked by 1 person

  2. I loved reading about how you write, the words erupting like a stream. That’s easy to relate to. I’ve told people that words whirl about in my head, and I have to get them out before they drive me crazy. Blogging is an extension of writing letters, basically telling family members what is going on and hoping to get news in return.

    Liked by 17 people

    1. Anne, you definitely get what I mean by those words. Seldom do they make that much sense in my head, and it is only when I get them down on paper/the screen that they are intelligible. I think the concept that blogging is an extension of journal or letter writing is correct. Many bloggers had penfriends and so there is that innate desire to connect, build networks, hear news and learn from others. It is a wonderful world to be a part of. Exciting isn’t it?

      Liked by 8 people

  3. Haven’t used ‘like’ buttons since I can remember. I blog because I need to feel the connection to the Web world. As my dear friend (yes, friend !) Maggie tells me, there are those who will always read my posts but rarely comment. Then there are the Amandas of the world who will always comment ..
    Love ’em both.

    Liked by 12 people

    1. Good on you for abstaining from pressing that like button, M-R. But that would be just as I imagine you. A strong, independent, avant-gardist, trailblazer, unfazed by populist b.s. I am chuffed to know that both Maggie and I have a place in your world!

      Liked by 3 people

          1. It’s my favourite critical utterance. Stringer used to put on a ‘hurt’ face and say “You just called me an idiot ..”
            You should be honoured.

            Liked by 2 people

  4. Amanda, Thank you for sharing an excellent and engaging post! I believe there are as many blog styles as there are bloggers. I learned early on about ‘no rules’ to blogging. I was very surprised about the kind, thoughtful, generous, smart, diverse blogging community.

    The phrase that resonates with me “…those who have an urge to write or tell stories, through photos or words, enjoy their art, interact with their audience and along the way, make friends.”

    You are obviously a natural, candid, thoughtful and thought-provoking writer. I extra “like” how you ended this post!💕

    Liked by 11 people

    1. Hello dear Eric/ka, you make a good point about there being as many blog styles as bloggers. I suppose that’s the liberating aspect of blogging – no rules. And why should there be rules? It is free expression – on any subject. It is also very sweet of you to say such positive things about my writing – but without my blog, I doubt I would be one-third as good as you credit me to be. It has been a great education. I agree with you on the surprise of finding that bloggers are diverse, generous, smart, kind and thoughtful. Many other realms in the web world are not as gentle to the spirit. ❤

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Interesting post! Although I follow a few blogs for the writers’ expertise (fashion, photography, or cooking, for example), I seldom read posts by bloggers who give life advice as I find that most have no formal background in their subject (the self-proclaimed “experts” that Snow mentioned). But, their blog, their rules and I am happy that they have found their niche and a following. I much prefer to read entertaining and engaging blog posts that are well-written and not too wordy. When I started my blog almost eight years ago, I had no idea that it would bring so many friends into my life that I wouldn’t have otherwise. How great is that!?

    Liked by 14 people

    1. Hi Janis, Thanks for your comment. It is great that blogging brings so many people into our lives. Connecting through words alone, gives blogging friends a unique bond and sometimes, more of a basis for friendship than a casual conversation irl.
      Your comment about ‘advice,’ posts has made me think more about that genre of bloggers giving advice, without any formal background. It can be risky. At times, I may even be one of them? I hope not, as any advice I give is something given by re-telling my experiences and asking questions, or referencing a text I found valuable. Does the way it is told make a difference to the advisory posts that you read?
      I tend to shy away from very long posts too – I suppose our concentration span diminishes as we age, and reading posts that are heavy on factual details, whilst commendable, loses the reader it if is not engaging. Blogging is not the school classroom where we get extra marks for mentioning certain points in our essays!

      Liked by 3 people

  6. Although I’m still not sure what my original reasons for blogging were, the reason that I have remained is connecting with others. I am incredibly grateful for the meaningful connections that blogging has brought to me. I have met several bloggers in real life, and see or chat with some of them regularly. I never realized that this was even an option when I first pressed “publish”! Even when I quit blogging I know that several of these relationships will remain. 😀

    Liked by 13 people

    1. Indeed, Donna, it is a deep connection that we have with other bloggers who sync with us. I wonder if bloggers who connect in this are the ones who are prepared to bare their soul a little more, in their writing? Disclosing our lives in a public way makes us vulnerable, but the payoff of a deep and fulfilling friendship is definitely worth it.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I started blogging to have a record of my elopement plans. Then we quickly moved to Australia for a year and I thought I would never be able to return the emails asking me about my time there. So I put it down in a blog, pictures and all. As the years went on, it became my habit to record our travels and adventures. It was meant for sharing with close friends mostly, as a narrative, not expecting comments.

    Later on, I tried my hand at blogging for a magazine and was taught that list formula as a sure-fire way to attract readers. I’ve resisted monetizing my blog because I cannot stand how so many blogs are so filled with ads and video feed that I can barely read the text in the post. Allowing such an intrusion into my own journal of events would never work for me.

    So 12 yrs later, my blog sits, a bit neglected, as I have gone on to using my blogging and web skills to promote an association I currently work for. It’s their adventures and events I promote through my writing. In a small way, I am able to add my own flavour through an editorial in the monthly newsletter I publish. And very much like blogging, I have made a lot of new friends, to the extent that we don’t always talk about work. We (husband and I) tease people by saying I spend more time in conversations, both written and via videoconference, with men in the Artillery than my husband (the actual Gunner) does.

    Anyway, long winded comment. I guess I had lots to say after all. And that, my dear, is what your blog accomplishes. Whether or not it was its original intended purpose.

    Thank you for the thoughtful and intelligent blogging. You do, always, give me something to ponder.

    Liked by 12 people

    1. Oh Catherine, I am deeply touched by your kind words. Even though your blogging has taken you in a different direction, I like that you have kept up writing, and I can see that there are lots of thoughts whirling around in your head wanting to get out. As has been mentioned, blogging is never static, but an evolving entity. Changing shape, direction, lying dormant at times, allowing us to learn and develop. It sounds like blogging has been helping you all along to channel and facilitate your next writing adventure. I am so chuffed that I am able to give someone, something to ponder about!

      Liked by 3 people

    2. I relate, I have started blogging to share my knowledge about technology, but that was not very nice. I got many hits, but it felt cold in blog world. Then we moved to Kazakhstan for a while, from my home country South Africa. I was alone, knew nobody who can speak my own language, and no more than ten people in our city – Oskemen (Ust’-Kamanogorsk) could speak English. So I started writing about it, to remember when I am old.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. A bold move to go to a place where the language and presumably, customs are so very different. A blog is a perfect way for you to connect with the English speaking world I think. Many exchange students start blogs for the same reason. And to update folks at home on what is happening. Were you able to pick up the native language?

        Liked by 3 people

        1. I tried my best, but was unsuccessful. They are speaking Russian – which have words almost exactly as Afrikaans (my mother tongue, such as teatr (teater Afrikaans and theatre English). But they count differently, have rules for changing verbs (male/female etc) such as German. And then – their mother tonge us Kazakh – a very difficult language, so Russian is actually their second language. We used translation apps to communicate – and most of the time the translations were good enough.

          Liked by 3 people

          1. If it is anything like Polish, forget it. I tried to learn that and realized that one had to grow up immersed in the language in order to make your tongue and mouth form the correct sounds!

            Liked by 3 people

  8. You make a very good point about blogging for likes, I agree you could definitely get more attention by posting some negative comments on Facebook or Instagram. But that’s not a particularly fulfilling endeavour.

    Liked by 9 people

    1. Trevvie – isn’t that what the internet trolls are so good at doing. Sparking a debate for nefarious reasons – just because they can. The creators of the like button found similarly that:- according to the documentary Snow mentioned, they thought they’d invented a functionality that was going to spread positivity and harmony but ironically has led to so much unhappiness and unrealized expectations especially teenagers. Not as fulfilling an invention as first thought.

      Liked by 4 people

  9. 🙂 Now, that is a lovely topic.

    For starters, writing blog posts are not a waste of time (People read them for various reasons).

    My advice-related posts are entertaining (My style of writing is useful information that is written in a highly entertaining manner).

    In my case, I value comments more than likes. The truth is that anyone can press the “Like” button without ever reading a word that we published in our blog posts.

    And, blogging is certainly a fabulous way of expressing ourselves.

    Liked by 9 people

    1. Hey Renard, Great Point. Someone could scroll through the entire reader and hit like on every post, and not read any of it. I can think of one blogger who seemed to do just that and has a huge following now. He has never made a single comment but seconds after I posted, he would send a like! He can’t have read any of it. So do I follow and engage with his blog. No.
      I love hearing that you write in an entertaining way. We are writers! After all!
      Comments and community are the reward for the writing effort! Are they not?

      Liked by 6 people

  10. My pet dislike is bloggers that over self promote on each and every post, not to mention those who preach on health. You’re right that most are not qualified. I enjoy following bloggers who write blog posts in a humourous way, walks around their local area or general thoughts on life. I enjoy popping over to your blog for a good read; this post made me think, why did I begin blogging. Initially, it was to do with travel and housesitting. Now, it is life in New Zealand.

    Liked by 10 people

    1. I appreciate your comment, Suzanne, and it is so nice to hear that you come over here for a good read. That has made my day!
      Sounds like your blog has gone through some different iterations too. New Zealand is close to my heart, having family there.

      Liked by 4 people

  11. I was stunned when I realised that complete strangers may have an interest in anything I write. It took me quite some time to deal with what I thought of originally as an intrusion into my space. My writing started as a travel journal for my friends and family to be able to keep with where we were, and what we were doing. Now it’s just a place I store my best photos, and record a bit about me, and my life. It’s basically now just a diary, and people can follow along if they choose.

    Liked by 12 people

  12. Why write a blog? Hm…several reasons for me, but primarily I wanted an outlet for my creative aspirations. And I found it with blogging! In the 9 years since I started my blog, I’ve felt more free. People who have known me now see a side they didn’t know existed. As with journaling, blogging has been therapeutic and inspirational. But unlike journaling – which is a purely solitary endeavor – I get to connect with countless new personalities from all walks of life.

    It’s been an incredible experience for me!

    Liked by 9 people

    1. Excellent, Alejandro. I failed to highlight the difference between the therapeutic benefits of journalling versus blogging so thank you for that. One is public and the other private. One connects and the other is solitary. I love that you have noticed a positive change since you started blogging. Blogs are a great place to hone our writing skills. Perhaps the ‘likes’ have a certain role to play after all, in terms of drawing some conclusions or feedback, for our own improvement as a writer? If we think of those comments in the right way; we don’t want to preach to and only receive comments from the converted; for then we fail to grow. Neither do we want all the comments to be negative. Some of one and the other kind, is the optimum as long as the negative comments maintain respect.
      It has been wonderful to have you join me in this blogging journey for as long as you have. I just went to look up the date I followed your site but wordpress have changed the format and I need to scroll through all the pages – darn it. Anyways, I know our chats have extended for years. It is always fun to see a comment and you are correct, we have met some interesting personalities over the years.

      Liked by 5 people

  13. I like blogging because it connects me to a range of very different people. Also I love to write about the places I visit. I value very much all the comments I receive. I like a blog that tells a story about someone’s life. I’m not keen on the top ten places to visit. I do like blogging tips on how to make your blog more easier to read as well.
    You write a great post as well 🙂

    Liked by 12 people

    1. Recipes are always welcome and informative. Your travel posts especially those to unusual destinations are most helpful to those contemplating travel in that area. Perfectly helpful and needed.

      Liked by 4 people

  14. Thanks for such an interesting response, Amanda! 🙂 I do agree with what you’re saying. So many things to say, maybe I’ll make a list! (pun intended! btw, I love to-do-lists)
    -I gather headings are still good for SEO and I like your use of them as well as the highlight boxes and quotes. That’s something I’ve often thought of improving on in my posts, byt haven’t gotten round to it
    -Diversity is good, and my work persona actually seeks advice posts quite often! 😀 At work, I might do a quick search on “LinkedIn target audiences” and end up with 7 articles titled “How to create segmented audiences in LinkedIn”… and I scroll through them all, only reading the best ones
    -I’m not saying all blogs should be entertaining and not informative, I’m merely trying to encourage people to step out of the mould, think outside the box, and to dare to try another approach and be creative
    -Also, the blogger who I quoted is actually one of the world’s leading authorities on growing from an ordinary blogger to a millionaire (dare I mention his name here, I’m sure his advice has helped many monetary bloggers who want an “influencer” lifestyle). Since his words are read/listened to by many, I wish he’d at least be aware of the fact that some bloggers don’t want to become an advice site, but still would like to grow –> any advice for that angle woulld be appreciated! 😀 (Although I do know the basics: leave comments on popular posts, network, use tags and categories, link your blog to blog lists, etc. All things I did as a newbie. I think I also wrote a few advice posts at some point! Like you said, as newbies we try it all – if we are the ambitious type, and I am)
    -As a side note, accepting a freebie is taxable here, in my country, although I’m sure not all bloggers or youtubers declare their free gifts. So that already makes me say no to even trying that approach, because making an extra tax declaration is too much work (being employed at a company means my employer declares my taxes for me and so I have no experience in doing that. I’d basically have to be a freelancer or entrepreneur to accept anything free for my blog posts)
    -Self-expression is one of my main kicks I get out of blogging, too. I always say that my blog is an art gallery, not a place where I sell ads. (And I do ads for a living, so I have nothing against that per se. These are just two very different things and the big blogging names seem to never have heard of hobby bloggers)
    Cheers and thanks for a great post, Amanda! I love thought-provoking posts! 🙂

    Liked by 10 people

    1. Thanks for the lengthy comment – that alone could have made another follow up post!
      I know that you are, “trying to encourage people to step out of the mould, think outside the box, and to dare to try another approach and be creative,” and I love and applaud that! However, other bloggers may level that – criticism of list-style posts, and sometimes it is a legitimate concern for readers, as some have alluded to in the comments here.
      Declaring free samples on your tax – woah. I have lived in Australia for too long to think this is not harsh. But then, I am aware tax is viewed differently in the Scandi region. I don’t think any influencers here declare any gifts!
      I am quite cynical of these millionaire bloggers. They leave me cold, but good luck to them if they can make a living out of it.
      Here’s to creative self-expression. Thanks for making me think more about blogging.

      Liked by 6 people

      1. My main intention was to criticise the advice to give advice, and not to hurt the feelings of anyone doing lists. But then again, every time you voice an opinion, someone is always going to disagree. The option is to not say anything at all, of course.
        Anyway, I’ll keep this comment shorter – and yes, here’s to creative self-expression! 🙂

        Liked by 4 people

        1. That is the interesting thing about writing. We don’t have a tone or facial expressions to hear the sentiment behind the written words. It is little wonder that we sometimes have misunderstandings and why I guess (I am finding out), writers can be sued, personally, for the words that they write. Hence the restraint by journos to write cutting edge stuff and instead, toe the company line.
          Sometimes any writer may write provocatively, but other times, their words are inadvertently misconstrued or taken out of context. I feel that personal blogging hasn’t gotten into that litigation area, but perhaps it has in some places? I don’t know. What is the legal situation with writers in Finland? Can they be personally sued for opinion pieces?

          Liked by 5 people

  15. Amanda, a superb post all about blogging and it encapsulates all the various reasons so many of us set out on this road! As a newbie I wanted to share about my first novel … as I was writing it! 😀 My blog quickly morphed into so much more and along the way I’ve learnt so much about writing, social media but most of all made wonderful and enriching friendships around the globe! Wishing you a wonderful weekend! Xx 😀❤️

    Liked by 10 people

    1. It is so cool that you expanded your initial goal, in blogging, Annika. A blog is almost a living thing, taking us in directions we had not anticipated. Sometimes giving us more back in terms of frienships, learning and community. I love that I can keep up with grass roots life on the other side of the world. I hope your weekend is similarly enriching. 😄

      Liked by 5 people

      1. Exactly so! 😀 Even now, I’m finding it is taking me in new surprising directions! Thank you, I’m having a wonderful weekend with my son home for three weeks – the longest time I’ve seen him this year! 😀

        Liked by 3 people

  16. I’m trying to write in a range of different ways and think this makes blogging abit fun. It’s so hard not to be sucked into writing “those posts” for views. I imagine each medium has it (eg youtube) I enjoy reading listicles sometimes and from writing some, it can be quite challenging! I would agree with you there that blogging is 100% self-expression and that’s the beauty that it should be. Even if it can be hard not to be swayed at times.

    Liked by 9 people

  17. Wonderful post and the thoughts you expressed are interesting.

    Many times I wonder, each one is to his own or her own.

    Selecting a general topic is a better option as compared to a particular niche, where the readers number is limited.

    Follows and likes are nothing but a ‘feel good factor’

    The real happiness and joy comes when somebody interacts with the blog author via meaningful comments in response to that particular topic.

    Unlike in most of the blogs, In the photography related blogs….there is not much to say other than expressing words like, fantastic, beautiful, fabulous etc.

    Of course those who are really into photography can discuss technical details.

    To be frank..when I added ‘philosophy’ to my bog title I was so sure that, none will go through my blog, (since philosophy is a boring stuff)…leave alone …photography part.

    Checking the statistics, number of likes, number of follows, and getting all these bloggers awards, viewership count etc….in my opinion is childish.

    All that SEO stuff etc…..better leave it to the experts…..rather than…we breaking our heads.

    To be precise blogging is much tougher than most other alternates that are available, most importantly one must have passion, time and energy to sustain.

    Added to the confusion is the number of words in a post supposed to be. 100 or 500 or 1000 or more the better…?

    Personally I feel it depends on the content and the style of the author in hooking the audience. Since majority lack patience to read the entire tire content, I feel better to restrict the number of words.

    Somewhere I read total number of words should be less than 150 so that all are pleased to read the topic fast. But can the author be restrained this way?
    I don’t know.

    It’s a known fact that readers usually scroll when the blog is lengthy.

    The bogs which exclusively cover ‘advices’ ….They bring smile on my face and I did a blog post on this topic in Renard’s world.

    My apologies for this lengthy comment.

    Thank you Amanda for the thought provoking post.

    Liked by 7 people

    1. There is no need at all to apologise for a lengthy comment, Ptp. Long comments are very welcome here. You responded to all the points thoroughly. Many techy aspects of
      blogging can be left to the experts unless we choose to upskill in that area. Each to their own, as you say. It is not obligatory.
      Perhaps the preferred word totals for posts is country specific?
      I agree though it depends on the topic and word count is not something I think about when I write unless the post gets too long, then I break it into two parts.

      Liked by 4 people

    2. I can’t be restrained, maybe because I actually write my blog to my older self to remember life at a younger age. I often write thousands of words, and then I am kind of shocked when I get comments, which says that somebody was willing to read all of those words. Personally, I do not like reading long blogs as I kind of peep in blog world when I have a moment to spare. But I do start reading, and often I read long blogs – especially when they tell a story.

      Liked by 6 people

  18. An excellent analysis of our activity. Mine began as a diary to keep in touch with my children, and has developed into what it is today by paying attention to the comments of the such good friends it has brought me.

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  19. Interesting. I have started my blog as a way of remembering my life in Kazakhstan when I am an old woman who can’t remember things that have happened years ago. So, I do not care about likes or comments, although I sometimes say something that I would like to start a conversation. Following this route, I have gathered a small group of followers, of whom I would say 10% engage in my posts. I am in awe because they found my stories interesting enough to strat following me. But I do not write for them, I write for the older version of me. Maybe she will understand myself better than I do due to the self reflections …

    Liked by 7 people

    1. A lovely idea to record memories that you may re-visit at a later date. Perhaps we are all doing consciously, or inadvertently. As long as WordPress keeps our platform going. I once had a website that was archived as the platform was shut down. I can still see it if I search in the old internet archives but can no longer edit it. Do you intend to print off the stories in hard copy?

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    2. I would love to be part of the conversation , learning to me is universal and it is the universality that we redeem ourselves and share our insights through our experiences to the world.

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  20. Amanda, keep writing my friend. I learn things, am reminded of things, and get to see the perspective of others on things. Or, I may just enjoy a melancholy reflection like a just did, where the author wrote a loving tribute to a best friend from childhood who left us early. Keith

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        1. Recipes are great and I do enjoy finding new things to create via cooking blogs. I guess that fits into the information and advice genre? So glad you made and enjoyed the cake. That I, an average person sitting at home in Australia, can have a positive effect on a family in the other half of the world, still amazes me.
          As an aside, I have just received a lovely tea that would be the perfect accompaniment. I might just have to make another cake now. Cheers, have a great Sunday.

          Liked by 1 person

  21. I blog because I like writing about everyday things. I also like reading about everyday things from folks around the world. The differences are fascinating to me, and the similarities are heartening. A wonderful community that truly was a lifeline during the pandemic.

    Liked by 8 people

    1. That is a good angle, Laurie. I remember reading, “it is the differences and similarities that define us.” Of course, but it is always interesting to compare and contrast and again – along the way we learn things and become more cognizant of diversity!
      I noticed that blog stats amongst other things went up during the pandemic. Stands to reason. We are just going through a snap lockdown and I have spent more time at the computer desk. Less distractions = more time to blog!

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  22. I like blogging because it’s a creative way to communicate with the world. I do it simply because I want to and it allows me to dump the contents of my brain somewhere else other than the garbage can.

    Liked by 7 people

    1. Good on you, Krista. I do agree ‘dumping the contents of my brain’ can be cathartic. It is better to get it out than repress them and lock them down. Otherwise they fester and find a different way to emerge.

      Like

  23. I blog because as an ex-professional feature writer I feel the urge to write about things and to make contact with readers. Blogging is the only way to do this. I also write short stories but I use these for competitions as they are not what’s needed for today’s mainstream readership. I still do some editing and I’m a firm believer that everyone needs editing, myself included, as every time I refer back to one of my posts I find that needs changing. In my case it also allows me to play around with my photography which otherwise will languish on my hard drive never seeing the light of day. I think I get more pleasure from the exposure of these images than I do from the writing – quite a change for me.
    Your post certainly made me thing of why I write.

    Liked by 7 people

    1. It is intriguing that you find more joy from photography given that you have a background in professional writing, Mari. Although, is that because writing is associated with the notion of work, perhaps?
      I can relate to your desire to use your photographs. As I was taking a photo of a beautiful sunrise recently, someone asked me, I often wonder what people do with all these photos of sunrises? I should preface that with saying I am always taking photos. I told her that I used them on my blog or to share with friends overseas, edit them, and hopefully entertain others as well as keeping a visual diary for myself. Like you, it gives me pleasure.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I think I miss the phone call from an editor who wants something in a hurry and having to get my brain switched on and into action and then seeing that work in a glossy mag or newspaper. Photography replaces some of that excitement as it is new. Incidentally, my editing of my last comment wasn’t very thorough, one left out word and one typo! That would never do for publication so I shall have to pull my socks up!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Were you typing on a phone keypad, Mari? I can relate to typos on that medium, if so. Interesting you say you miss the adrenaline rush to deadlines. I think that would stress me out, but make me get it done asap. We shall see, soon, as I am about to do some freelance jobs.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. No, I was typing on a 27″ computer with a keyboard with extra large symbols! I have severe macular degeneration which has deteriorated a lot over the last year (that’s why I had to give up writing) so it’s easy for me to miss things. That’s no excuse though!

            Liked by 1 person

              1. I don’t think I need this just yet, it will come I expect, but as long as I can enlarge the script on the screen I prefer to see the words than have them spoken by someone in an accent that isn’t like the voice in my head! Meantime, monthly eye injections keep one eye stable and things like blogging keep me stable!

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  24. You have obviously asked some very good questions here by all the comments. I love it when I can start a conversation and you always do an excellent job of it. There are so many reasons to blog and each one is right for that individual. I’ve had people suggest I sell something on my blog to make a little extra money. I think that would take the pleasure right out of it for me. I am also not interested in statistics. If I can get a good conversation going, I’m thrilled. I started writing almost 11 years ago when I was confined to my bed most of the time. I couldn’t even watch television. I was trying to see if I could find anyone in the world that had experience what I was going through. Still haven’t found one. Since I couldn’t get out, I found blogging brought the world to me and gave me a community right from my bedroom. It’s helped me to heal and keep putting one foot in front of the other while continuing to grow my mind. I had a cheering section with each new achievement. I have learned so much from so many that no matter what, I keep trying to stay connected here. So many bloggers that I followed have stopped writing. I miss them like an old friend. Some I still connect with on other platforms, even snail mail. As usual, this time of year, I find myself pulled to other chores outside which gives me less time for blogging (and it does take a lot of time) but I just keep trying to keep in tough. Keep up the good work here, Amanda. We need your stimulating mind to keep us on our toes.

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    1. You have encapsulated the thought that permeates most of the readers and commenters here, Marlene: each way of blogging is right for that individual. I love that blogging gave you a lifeline in a difficult situation, a way to interact with the world. Isn’t that the best reason of all to blog?

      Liked by 1 person

    2. I agree with all you say. I would miss the ‘friends’ I’ve made here and without them blogging would be much less interesting. It’s so good to write something with certain people in mind and be able to look forward to their comments.

      Liked by 1 person

    3. And I hope you keep on too, as blogging is such a help when one is suffering any sort of confinement whether it’s physical or mental. In this non-judgmental place (one hopes) one can be free to moan about life’s vicissitudes, express joy in nature, family life or pets, or just add one’s serious and not so serious thoughts on world affairs. Bloggers come and go but there are always others to take their place.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Always others to take their place, that is true. And in so doing, the newbies bring different ideas and thoughts to this medium, which keeps it alive and growing.

        Like

  25. Thanks for your thought provoking post. It is something I often think and write about, when it all gets too much for my head and I have to get it out. Blogging is something I do for the fun of it, it gives me a purpose, I love sharing stories, photos, information, ideas and I enjoy learning from others. I’m not into niche blogging or making money but I do like engaging with others from around the world and hearing their different perspectives. Everyone has their own way of doing things and I have long since given up following too many ‘advice about blogging’ posts. It’s always interesting to read the thoughts of others. As to whether I would give up blogging if I didn’t have any readers or much engagement, I’m not sure. Take care and thanks again.

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  26. Hi Amanda, Lots of food for thought about blogging. I’m amazed by the vast interests and talents in the blogging world, and I find inspiration – certainly in photography – but in other areas, too. I enjoy the blogging friendships that develop over the years. On another note, I think a lot about artistic motivation and social media and try to keep that in check as best I can. Creating for likes is a soulless endeavor. Thought-provoking post, thanks.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Keeping social media in check is so important. Time slips away far too quickly as it is, let alone when our attention is diverted by mostly meaningless updates. A soulless endeavour is an excellent way to describe the practice of liking something without ever commenting.
      I imagine your blog with its stunning photography has amassed some followers from distant parts of the world?

      Liked by 1 person

  27. Amanda, you write in an intriguing, thoughtful way and get well thought out responses in return. I have thought and written a lot on this topic, but apparently not enough to get people to comment much about it. For the past year I’ve been in what I consider a more mature phase of blogging. Your word “innate” struck a cord with me. I’m writing for fun, to provide a service, of sorts, to learn, to make friends. The only thing I don’t do is sell anything. I tried it, but was super unsuccessful. I enjoy looking at stats, but I’m not obsessed like I was as a new blogger. My big goal is not to miss anyone or fail to visit people who visit me. I’m not frantic to get out more and more posts, but I am posting a lot. Since I started interviewing challenge hosts, that has guided my own posting because I want to support them. I am not always consistent, but I try.

    So thanks for posting this and drawing people out of their shells to comment. Well done, Amanda. Have a great week. 🙂

    Liked by 6 people

    1. I love that you are writing for fun, to provide a service of sorts, to learn and to make friends, Marsha. Your journey through blogging has gone through a few incarnations but you have learnt so much and built your profile along the way. Your intentions are pure so that will bring you a beautiful community.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I do have a wonderful community. I had a nice community nine years ago, and many of them are now close friends. Others have slipped away, but I’m much more intentional about my blogging now, and much more collaborative. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  28. Hi Amanda / wow / there were lots of little layers here in the various sections –
    – the word friendship is a bit ambiguous and whew / it can be mean different things to different people – and so I like how you mention “connections”
    I am a little tired of the word “tribe” as it just feels overused in my circle – and I would say that the reason I blog is 1) I blog to connect (with who and how deep will vary each season; 2) I blog to creatively express and share 3) I also blog because sometimes I like being able to have a place to have a voice on an issue and a place to share that opinion
    And I think bloggers can still be genuine and bring something great to the blogosphere even if they run ads or get perks for reviews
    With that said, a couple years ago I stopped following many bloggers that always had friggin affiliate links – and I still tend to stay away from bloggers that are here to make money – only because it does change their essence
    And closing thought – my least favorite thing about the blogging world is when bloggers become competitive – it does not happen a lot but I see it creep in with a few bloggers and (yawn) it gets me so fatigued 😴

    Liked by 7 people

    1. Friendship and its ambiguity is a topic that could spawn several posts, Yvette. Interesting that the word tribe has been overused in your area. I don’t hear it much here, but I think it aptly describes your closest knit friendship group. If you have one. Not everyone does and that is okay but it does place expectations and I am sorry for that.
      Great point about blogging to have a voice on an issue! That is an excellent reason for anyone to blog, and shows the value of the platform in an independent news source. Thanks so much for mentioning it.
      I don’t know anything about affiliate links and it seems like a very hard way to gain an income from your blog. Competitive bloggers is something I have not come across at all. Can you give me an example?

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Hi Amanda / only two bloggers come to mind right now for the competitive Angle and I don’t want to mention their names or give too much away – but there is a certain angst feeling I ha e gotten from them and only at certain seasons did I really see (or perceive on my end) this “one upping” or this kind of aggressive vibe – and one example was just when a lady was promoting her Indie book and Then bragging about a few things – sigh – it wasn’t the deep pride we have encountered with some folks – but there was a layer of that (and not all pride is bad – as we both know- because confidence and a Sense of personal pride can be beautiful – but this seemed like that pride of cockiness – it is not easy to fully explain but I have also observed that blogger with a few other behaviors / and so hey – let them be who they are but I keep my distance)

        Re: affiliate links – I see them less and less and it seems like years ago it was a bigger thing

        And the tribe word – first heard it years ago in a sociology book – then I think Seth Godin made it more popular
        And I was counseling someone this last winter (informally) and she was all upset that she did not have a tribe for support system – we talked through different angles of it came o with strategies for connecting and for developing support systems
        But it reminded me of a few things
        First – how we define words can vary – like friendship – like love – and maybe even tribe – because tribe can be inner inner circle of close friends – it can be many layers of circles to include acquaintances- it can refer to like minded folks or shared demographics – but ambiguous in definition and then ambiguous in how that tribe functions or unfolds in real life
        Second, I noticed that some people dee it as one more thing their sucky life doesn’t offer them
        Because when you say “close knit group” not everyone has that and it can be quite normal
        You know how you said a friendship topic could span several posts – whew I agree – and I recall church swindoll saying that if you have one or two true friends consider it lucky or blessed (then it depends on the depth and how we define his version) but I see the word tribe mentioned and then folks feel “less than” or assume it is one more thing they don’t have

        In a Monk episode – Mr Monk meets his dad and they drive in a semi truck together – they pass a father and his boys loading a Christmas tree onto a statin wagon
        mr Monk’s dad says “they”re not as happy as they look”
        And there was a nice pause,
        One of the takeaways I took from that astute little scene was that so often folks are always feeling like they miss out or look out to assume this or see that (with normal skewed perceptions)
        And so for my friend – I reminded her that her wonderful older daughter was part of her tribe – that I was too – even in a distant way – and then she could begin to build it (etc)
        — but that word bothers me and I am still chewing on why… maybe because it also could be exclusive in time – this health coach guy we know was always tossing around this word and when he said “part of my tribe” I imagined a closed off group and saw him in this country club kind of feel
        I like your definition
        But also see important social connections as non-tribe like
        Like years ago – women might have talked and connected at the watering hole (well or River) and men were known in the “gates”
        Or little towns and cities were the social circle for everyone that lived there
        And maybe with this world that has cars – we can drive to any area in town that we want – and even the global reach with technology – we can connect with so many folks
        And so our social support systems are less defined and maybe even feel absent for many –

        Like

        1. I love your lengthy comment! Excellent, Yvette. Thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to elaborate on what we were discussing. Isn’t it awesome we can discuss things this way, given we have never met and live on the other side of the big old world?
          I can see where you are coming from, with the word tribe, particularly if it is heard a lot and I like the way you described tribe to your client. Another like-minded soul who gets you could be a tribe member too. We could have financial, emotional, social, or physical tribes too, or we could remain tribeless, and that is okay if we want to. I think the word is exclusive so that connotation just adds to the feeling of isolation for those who feel they never quite fit in to any tribe, or don’t have a support system. We don’t have to have a tribe. That is an expectation that we place on others and that a person might place upon themselves, do you think?
          Competitive bloggers? Well that is part of a diverse society, but I would not be comfortable reading someone involved in putting down others, or propping themselves up. I like to read diverse blogs but that would certainly be one I would find hard to stomach.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. I lived your comment replies too
            And enjoyed the way you wrote this
            “We could have financial, emotional, social, or physical tribes too, or we could remain tribeless, and that is okay ”

            And yes / we are so far Across the globe I couldn’t even send you a cheap little used book (- it turned out to be a not so great book anyhow so I am glad it didnt work out!)
            Hope you have a great rest do your day ☀️🤍

            Liked by 1 person

  29. Thank you for the mention, Amanda. As a journalist I hated writing about I was told to and in the way I was forced. On my blog I can do or don’t do exactly what I please and choose. Such freedom! Any visitor is like having a friend who gives you a listen as you ramble or complain or rejoice or sing or dance or reminisce or tell stories or show holiday photos. And they are from all over the world, and they show and tell you what they want as well. Just great. Happy blogging!

    Liked by 3 people

  30. Many friends ask me Why do I write a Blog?
    then I just simply amswer them ” It´s like, why do I paint? or why do I love drawing,or my artwork?”Just like why certain people do acting, cross stitch or cook.
    It all boils down to your passion.
    It´s a simple answer but it sums up what fuels me from writing, taking photos and writing my expat experiences. It is definitely not something that I do just to get likes and praises from people. I love writing, it´s the best honest way of exporting from your mind the experience you had and transcribe it for others to relate, or to inspire at least.

    I guess everyone has it´s own forte. I also respect people who monetize their Blog because probably that´s how they want it to be. Or for Influences who fueled their Blog by millions of followers and contacts. That is just their own thing.It is the same as well with other fields.
    For me, as long as I enjoy and having fun writing, then I would continue to do so, for me, that is blogging with passion and not bragging.
    Audience & readers inspires and complement us through what we write, but it should not be alone to drive us to Blog.

    I´d like to thank you for this very engaging and relatable subject.Well done!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks ever so much for your kind words. I can see that you are a passionate writer and also have a very balanced view of other people’s reasons and style of blogging! Very Zen. I guess as personal bloggers we can be accepting of all others. We are not in a competition with them, are we? There is no boss wielding Key Performance Indicators at us!
      Everyone has their forte, passion and aspirations. Absolutely! There is space here for them all. Yay for blogging!

      Liked by 1 person

  31. That is so interesting to read. I personally believe everyone has some untold stories and perspectives that fade with the passage of time, and there is no better anguish than bearing an untold story within you.
    Therefore, writing blog is best. Writing perfectly synchronizes your heart and mind. Writing is such a creative outlet to broaden your senses. 

    I know how much Ive learned, its a never ending learning process.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Ritish, you have highlighted the reason some people turn to blogging. They like that it is anonymous and it can be a venue for telling that story that they cannot tell anyone else. Leaving aside comments, for a minute, they can unload via a post and not have the judgement of those who know them. But in the unloading they are releasing the burden on their heart or mind.
      “Writing perfectly synchronizes your heart and mind.” – Well said!

      Liked by 1 person

  32. A bit of advice that my favourite YouTuber gave me, is how important it is to put yourself out there on the Internet. When we engage, network, and talk with more new people, we’re essentially increasing our chances for ‘serendipity’ to happen, i.e we’re exposing ourselves more to exciting opportunities, and increasing our chances for lucky events to happen to us.

    This is what I always try and remember when blogging. Even if there’s no engagement or likes or follows right now, I’m in this game for the long term, and I trust in the process that patience and consistency should bring good results 🙂

    Liked by 6 people

    1. I like your dedication to the blogging craft, Rebellious Student. (Love your username too!) It sounds like you are familiar with these advice style posts that we have been discussing. For serendipity to happen, we do have to engage with the internet and other bloggers. You are right; we don’t know the sorts of opportunities out there if we don’t stick our neck out.
      And yet, an engaged blogger community does take time to build. I believe you also need sincerity and integrity to achieve this. The blogger community will sniff out shallow bloggers in an eye blink. I had very little expectations of blogging when I first started and knew that it would take 12 months to see any kind of growth. In that time, I read many, many other blogs, learnt heaps and along the way, friendships formed with othe bloggers. That would not have been possible if I was merely focused on the number of followers I had. So empathy, and altruism will hold you in good stead – when that comes, serendipity will follow.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Thank you for your add on! Yes, sincerity and integrity are also values I hold important, not just in blogging but life in general haha.
        I appreciate that we hold these same views, love engaging with other bloggers with the same mindset and values!

        Liked by 2 people

  33. I love the aspect of earning from blogging which was actually the reason why I was introduced to it in the first place. However, I immediately fell in love with it the moment I started writing my first blog post. I wouldn’t even mind failing as long as I keep having fun. I think it’s even more fun than my other hobby which is writing novels.

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  34. Interesting blog – I always ask to myself the same question? Well , to me more than finding friends and connecting with someone, which is not very easy with growing number of bloggers everyday – to me blogging pacifies my own mind from wandering thoughts , as I settle some debates running inside my mind – it gives a kind of meditative relaxing effect 🙂 Does it make sense ?

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Besides making friends and increasing connections via blogging, I get what you mean when you say your blog pacifies your mind. Writing in itself can be cathartic and calming. Am I getting what you mean, Lavarnya?

      Liked by 2 people

  35. I don’t agree with other people views I chose to listen to you, we have to resonate in other people’s experiences and culture’s,the world has become a global village, it’s through this platforms that we can learn, encourage one another and bring healing ,inspire and bring up a new generation with pride, the right community will always come ,give your best ,better is yet to come.

    Liked by 3 people

  36. I write blog so that I can express my views and let my views reach to other people. Even though I started blogging recently, but I used to write earlier too. Some take blogging just as a way to earn money but it should be taken as a platform to spread positivity and love by those who are passionate about writing not money! Nice post!

    Liked by 3 people

        1. I usually don’t ask or tell people to follow me as that is up to them to decide if they like my blog or not. This blog has over 6000 followers so I would not be able to do every one of them justice if I followed them all.

          Like

  37. Lately, Ave been wondering about the future in blogging with all this talk on ” become an expert ” … like I just want to express myself like I journal but to my Web friends for a quick recap after a month like can we still have this realistic type of style too in blogging . I don’t always have the advice to give much less to be assumed as an expert

    Like

        1. Thank you for asking. Of course you may re-blog this post and I like that you will write your own contribution to go with it. Just add a pingback or credit me as author, please.

          Like

  38. This is amazing 👏. Read my blog nofiltersattached.com/2021/07/introspection-of-individuality-and-happiness/” rel=”nofollow ugc”/nofiltersattached.com/2021/07/introspection-of-individuality-and-happiness/ as well. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  39. I’m glad there are different types of blogs. I chose to write one to connect with other people who have the same health problems and positivity ✨. New Blogger would love a follow back 😊

    Liked by 2 people

  40. Nice post, being new at blogging, I question all things you have mentioned above and realized that may be it’s how it is with everyone here. It has clarified me that blogging is more about the connect then anything else. It’s the sanctuary you create for yourself with your words and creativity. Making it trite helps no one, so better it be about your soul.🙂

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  41. This is a thoughtful post that stirred my own thinking—which is one of many reasons that I love blogging. As a retired professional writer, I revel in having the freedom to write what I choose, and I follow my curiosity wherever it takes me. But I was unprepared for the joys of finding a like-minded, supportive community. We learn from one another, and that’s a source of constant enrichment for me. The fact that I am reaching people on five continents—and they are reaching me—has expanded my world. I am so very grateful!

    Like

    1. Isn’t blogging amazing for expanding the world in our computer desk. We read independent opinions straight from the horses mouth, unfettered by corporate or nefarious interests. Connection, freedom of self-expression and community – that is what blogging is all about. A lot of people are suprised about the community aspect. That is the social media side of blogging, yet it appears much more PC, altruistic and generous than other platforms where short, clipped and often controversial thoughts and opinions are force feed to readers.
      So pleased to meet you Annie. Where are you based? I am in Australia.

      Like

  42. I a hundred percent agree with you. I just started a blog and whilst I’m still struggling to understand how WordPress works, I’m stuck as to why I want to blog. I love to write quite alright, but should I expect something in return cos I’m giving something out.
    After reading this post, I realize again the real reason I want to blog and that’s its something I want to do, for me, not for anybody else.
    Thank you for a wonderful post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. If you feel strongly that you need to write, you are well and truely in the right space and are well on your way. Do perservere. It is worth it. I tried to check your blog but the setting says it doesn’t exist. This sometimes happens with the settings. Have you published it yet? I would love to check it out.

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  43. Hi Amanda, this is a fabulous post! I appreciate you shining a light, your light, on the topic of blogging from so many different angles. I started my blog as a mere form of self-expression and to document my years in Australia back in 2012 (gasp). As writing and journalism is my profession, well one of my professions, and I got a paid gig as a travel expert for Google/ Google’s incubator project Touring Bird back in 2018, I decided to take blogging more seriously back in 2018. My aim is/ was to create a passive income from it while meeting fab people and making new friends. It’s definitely been a lot of work and it’s key to learn lots on marketing (and implement it haha) to create an income. Much slower than I thought for sure, so it definitely takes a lot of perseverance and patience in my experience to make some decent money from blogging. Hugs and thanks for this great post! ✨✨✨

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks ever so much for an informative and kind comment.
      It is marvellous that you started a blog as a kind of journal and it has morphed into a paid gig. There must only be a handful of millionaire bloggers and the line between marketing and writing seems to become blurred if a writer is going to rely on it for income without having the passion for self-expression. I suspect the time it takes to write good content doesn’t always correlate with the payments?
      The post content, of the moneymaking bloggers, doesn’t even seem particularly long, well written or interesting. So is their income more to do with the advertisers they are snared? Once the number of followers and engagement rises, there are a lot of new bloggers who follow along for a bit of exposure that might rub off on their own new blog.
      That is a bit frustrating, for those who spend a lot of time on good content. But do these bloggers stick around for long? I don’t think they do. Have you found that?
      Keep writing and keep blogging!

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  44. What an incredible post! You have covered so much ground! As a novice blogger you have given me a lot to think about. Thank you so much (and also to the blogger who shared your post😊)

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you for wishing me well on my journey. I started sporadically posting in March, but am increasingly drawn into it, mostly by reading other blogs. It is like discovering a whole new universe and I feel the need/urge to contribute in order to be part of it.

        Liked by 1 person

  45. Why did I start my blog? I can express my thoughts without interruption. I can be heard if a reader wants to listen. I think my voice is too soft and easily lost to those whom feel a need to dominate the conversation. My blog topics always provide me with new knowledge. I’m learning to tell a story and take better pictures, I think. :). Most people I know don’t even know I do this. It’s my thing and that’s ok.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Kevin, I can relate to everything you said. You may not think so, but I am also one who has lived with the burden of having a soft toned voice that many others cannot or choose not to hear.The older I get, the more it becomes a problem in social circles as my peers age and become hard of hearing. My mother can never hear me, my husband vacillates between either enjoying or hating not being able to hear what I say and in group situations where there is a very dominant speaker, I could easily interpret rudeness, dismissiveness or dislike of me on their part, when it is often my own lack of volume that causes them to react in a rude way.
      Blog topics are a better read than the mashed up bolus they still call news, served up for digestion on mainstream media channels. Blogging improves your story and recount skills and there are tips on every activity in life if we look. People are knowledgeable and provide real life experience. It is the perfect medium and you will find a supportive community who listens here. Maybe it grabs us more because of those reasons. I have been blogging for almost ten years and only the last year or so did I start to speak about my blogging, and only to known friends that I trust.
      You have a voice and it will be heard far and wide here.

      Like

  46. I had similar feeling about blogging. But once I started writing my blog, I became aware that it more than time pass. It teaches you so many things, importantly it allows to express oneself.

    Like

  47. I never understood the purpose of blogs. So I thought writing one would obviously be difficult. But after reading content from other bloggers I realized there is no right or wrong answer. You just write. And that’s where I’m starting from. I write stories so I can connect with all of these brilliant bloggers who have much to teach me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. No right or wrong answer. That is true. This platform gives us enormous freedom to write what we think, unrestrained from corporate interests. Reading a broad cross-section of blogs gives us knowledge and understanding of others. A good place from which to write! All the best to you, Kevin. Have you been writing stories your whole life?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. No I haven’t, I actually just started a couple of months ago. As of recently I kept thinking about it, and asking my friends if I should do it. I thought it could be a way for me to control my thoughts & channel them into like minded communities.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I have found blogging is a good way to chanell thoughts and get feedback from loke minds. Controlling thoughts though is difficult and near impossible in certain situations. Observing and accepting them is the key to moving towards letting them go.

          Liked by 1 person

  48. I am new to blogging. It is a technical word for me…I actually wanted to write, and I feel what you said is correct, writing comes automatically when you are in. Your emotions find words and an outcome is seen.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hey Divya, “Your emotions find words.” That is so accurate. Emotions of all things spur me to write. I need to drive the emotion out through words with help the healing and processing of strong feelings. That way I find equilibrium again. You know what I mean, I suspect, by your comment?

      Like

    2. Good luck with your blogging life, Divya. Be reciprocal and read more than you write to begin with. Read and post comments. Don’t ask or direct people to “follow me” and you will make more connections at a faster rate.

      Like

  49. Blogging provides one of the best platform to interact with like minded creative people from the world over.
    You are right we all want friends or audiences though it us not the likes but the real engagement which actually matters. People who read and add value are the ones I look for.
    It is a place to learn and grow. Variety is what makes it more appealing.
    Stay blessed always
    🙂🌹🙏

    Liked by 1 person

    1. “Variety in blogging makes it more appealing.” Yes this is important to point out. Very rarely does one blogger write exactly the same thing, unless it is a specific challenge or they have re-blogged someone else’s post. Does that happen to you?

      Like

  50. I have only been writing on my blog for a month or so. I initially started because I felt the need to share my thoughts and perhaps reach someone who needs to hear what I say. I would love to write a story, but lack the confidence at the moment to try. As for making money from it, I have no idea if I am good enough to do that. I love writing and that’s good enough a reason to keep doing it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. A good enough reason indeed, Yumarlin. Keep writing. Forget about the money to begin with. You can also find that later, or if you are really good, the money will find you!

      Like

  51. Writing a blog for me is very helpful, it helps me to spread my message of health and fitness. Build connections and develop an online presence.

    And best of all, it’s a nice relief from my usual hours spent studying for school

    Like

    1. So you are still at school and you have started a blog. Good on you. Keep writing. Many teens start a blog and then give up. You must persevere for at least a year to get going with a blogging community. It is not like facebook with instant likes.

      Like

      1. Thank you so much for your encouragement, yes I will stay motivated and keep writing. I read the book “the compound effect” and I realise that things don’t grow linearly, all the popular blogs today got only one or two page views in their early days🔥 so I just plan to keep putting out content for atleast 2 years while paying low attention to the views.
        And thank you, getting advise from an experienced blogger encourages me alot

        Liked by 1 person

  52. Blogging is a way to share what you’ve leaned with others. Like human we have such tendency to share our passion and anything we love with the world around us.
    I will appreciate any support from us to our new blog at : computergecko.com

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for writing a comment and not just adding your ping. I delete pings that don’t bother to comment! I think blogging is definitely about sharing. Humans do like to share information to others. How long have you been blogging?

      Like

  53. I have to emphasize that blogging provides another avenue for people to express their opinions about any particular subject. We writers and bloggers are true adherents and supporters of the right of free speech and freedom of expression; thus, we value any means to allow that. Humanity has always moved forward when people can express themselves honestly and without fear of reprisal.

    With a personal journal – which I’ve maintained since 1983 – anyone can feel free and safe. But blogging permits many of those same thoughts to be shared with everyone. True freedom, indeed, sails through the universe on the promise of spoken and written words!

    Liked by 1 person

  54. Blogging connects our thoughts and help us to express in front of world😊
    But the problem is in schools students think writing is boring thats why we are experincing lack of writers but i hope still all is good.
    Bye the way your blogs are great😊😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Learning simultaneously. Yes indeed, aemrat. Language translators do benefit us in many ways so we can access words and knowledge previously locked away from us.

      Like

  55. Needed this blog of yours. It’s just some months since I started blogging. And just before a year is over I had already started asking myself what am I doing this for apart from loving it. Thank you

    Liked by 1 person

  56. Blogging is such an amazing corner of the internet, especially for the one of us who grew up without internet and witness it explode. But I’m always struggling with blogging for the fun of it and blogging for the stats. Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

  57. I loved your article! I thought I started blogging to make money but as I got into it a little more I realized that being able to express myself and help lighten someone’s mood became more important. You can feel the difference between a blog intent on building an email base and generating income and one that’s being written for the love of the craft. I would like to understand how to get more comments because I really like connecting with people.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Marcie, How long have you been blogging? If it is only a short while, you have to give yourself a little more time to build your community. It will happen, though. If you want to speed up the process, visit as many blogs as you can in your genre of interest, using the reader and tags, comment on their blogs and get to know them. They will more than likely visit your blog to find out what kind of blogger you are and if your blog is interesting for them.
      Another tip is to participate in challenges, be that photo/poem/story/recipe/coffee shares about your weekly happenings, or whatever challenge you might be interested in. Search in the reader using the tag challenge. I hope that helps!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you for the encouragement. It means a lot. I’ve been doing this particular blog since May, but I had a previous blog several years ago that taught me a lot, through hindsight, about how to interact with my readers. I like the idea of participating in challenges. Thanks!

        Liked by 1 person

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