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Lavender

Farming and rural communities are doing it tough in these times. Most of us recognize that.

You will be be delighted and surprised at the hidden gems found in many country towns and rural areas that were formerly overlooked by the overseas obsessed traveling public. Amandine Lavender is one such gem near the central Queensland coastal town of Bargara.

Those seeking a safer alternative to traveling overseas can not only support farming communities by making a day trip but also include rural towns, as holiday destinations.

Amandine Lavender Farm, Seaview Road, Bargara.

Around four hours drive north of Brisbane, Australia, or five minutes from the famous Turtle Rookery at Mon Repos, you will find Amandine Lavender farm, along Seaview Road at Bargara. See how the lavender is grown and utilized into a vast array of therapeutic and beauty products on sale at Amandine’s gift shop. Online ordering is coming soon.

Formerly a family sugarcane farm dating back 3 generations, the falling price of sugar encouraged the owners to diversify into growing lavender and developing a new business venture. The owners have transformed a pretty potting shed and garden into a flowering lavender paradise.

Amandine Lavender Products

The lavender product range includes soaps or oils, sprays and creams as well as soothing lavender sleep and relaxation balm, excellent for tension headaches, which I carry in my handbag at all times. Old favorites like sachets of dried lavender for pillows, wheat packs, or to hang in the wardrobe to keep pesky moths away from one’s clothes, are also on offer.

At Amandine farm, you are encouraged to pick as much lavender as you can carry in your hands, to take home with you. Enjoy the relaxing scent of freshly cut lavender in your own home for days after your visit.

Then when the flowers started to droop, cut them and hang them upside down to dry out. They can them be used as dried flowers or sprinkled in sachets for the wardrobe or undies drawer. Lavender foliage can be trimmed and used for propagating new lavender plants.

How to Grow Your Own Lavender

Amandine has self-guided propagation activities in their garden potting shed but you can always grab an information leaflet and try cultivating lavender, at home.

When to Pick and Trim Lavender

Spring flowering lavender should be cut in Spring whilst the winter flowering forms should be picked in autumn in order to take advantage of the best time to grow lavender from existing plants.

Cultivation of Lavender

Cut a leaf tip of lavender, about two inches, or 5 -8 cms long, dip the end in a rooting powder (available from nurseries or larger supermarkets), and place in a good quality potting mix. Water it in, then cover and seal with a plastic bag, setting it aside for a few months.

After several months, you will be delighted to find you have created new lavender plants of your own, at no cost.

Lavender plants do prefer a dry soil; they don’t like to moist ground for too long. That is why they prefer coastal climates and have not problem tolerating windy conditions.

Conveniently, these are the conditions we have at the home by the sea. I will be potting out some more of these hardy and highly perfumed beauties soon.

Lavender is the plant the keeps on giving.

Amandinelavender.com.au

Opening hours may vary due to Covid. Ring ahead to check.

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54 thoughts on “Lavender”

      1. She was actually a pampered elderly lady. Have been for her married life too. My grandfather was well off and she could afford to be the lady of the manor, so to speak. The one that you had afternoon tea with.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Lol @Keith. So pleased that my post had the desired effect! I am not generally a fan of purple as a colour, but there is something so attractive in the harmonious hues of the lavender plants and the red volcanic soil they were growing in was an intense contrast.

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    1. The smell of lavender in that shop is strong, Dorothy, but not overpowering. Just beautiful, and I have to admit to taking a few deep breaths myself. The owner I think must be very relaxed!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. What a beautiful way to promote our rural communities, there is so much right on our back doorstep that sometimes we miss or due to our hectic lives haven’t had time. I love exploring our town & its outer communities, we have met some beautiful people in the process.
    We grow lavender i have it hanging in on the back of the toilet door, depending on the deposit left, all that is needed is a little pat on the lavender & depository odour gone & the sweet aroma of lavender fills the hall.

    Liked by 1 person

        1. Wonderful mental imagery! Keukenhof, is fantastic in bloom. I have never been, but a friend lived in The Hague, for a few years and used to visit the gardens sending me the most breath-taking photos. I imagine your memories of France to be similar, going by your description.

          Liked by 1 person

  2. I bought a couple of 4″ lavender pots years ago and transplanted them close together in our backyard. Now their about a 5ft by 3ft bush. (Would’ve been a couple of feet wider, but I had to trim away from the house for a termite treatment.) Took part of a cutting and put into an 18″ pot on the side of our house. Been to a lavender farm, where they also sold creams, soaps, etc made from lavender. The bloomer plants are pollinated by bees. Twice a year I trim the brown flower tops, in order to insure continued growth and new flowering.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You have the kavender game all sewn up, so to speak. Well done on growing such a healthy sounding bush and propagating from it as well.
      Have you posted about the lavender farm ?

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