Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

River boats art

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

River boats art

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

 

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.

 

I hope you will too.

 

 

 

Continuing with the present theme of Swedish proverbs, I found this thought provoking proverb. Why would a good man cope better?  Would not a devious, conniving man, or woman, succeed too?  But, of course, there is a price to pay for ill – gotten gains, isn’t there?  Is this what the proverb refers to, do you think?

 

“Bra karl reder sig själv ” – 

(A) good man will cope on his own ~ Swedish Proverb

 

sweden torg

 

Coping and being self-reliant is a goal many of us have, but failing to cope or, at least, being unhappy might also provide us with opportunities to learn, according to Bill Gates.

 

“Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning.”Bill Gates

 

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CC0 Creative Commons

 

Do you agree with the Microsoft wiz?

 

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment below.

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Proverbial Friday – Surely something to ponder about.

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Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

raindrops

 

“When it rains soup, the poor man has no spoon.”

– Swedish Proverb

 

 

 

Dalahest - Traditional horses

 

 

 

Storytelling is the most powerful way to put ideas into the world today.”

– Robert McKee

 

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Robert McKee, A Fulbright Scholar, is the most sought after screenwriting lecturer around the globe. He has dedicated the last 30 years to educating and mentoring screenwriters, novelists, playwrights, poets, documentary makers, producers, and directors internationally. However, McKee has been criticized for teaching screenwriting without ever having a script of his made into a film.

 

Thinking about the Swedish proverb, does it seem a little shallow or simplistic, to you? Poor communities can after all, have a very rich life, albeit not in materialistic or monetary terms. Is the proverb referring only to financial matters ?

And what do you make of Robert McKee’s words? Media can be used as a propaganda tool but is the media capable of suggestions of thought? Storytelling can teach us lessons in allegorical form, but can it also lead to misconceptions  by the reader or viewer? Take, for example, teenage girls who think they should look and act a certain way, based on watching mainstream TV? Do you think that media is purely entertainment value for the discerning viewer and that entertainment value can be separated from unrealistic impressions that relationships should be always be blissful, and an institutions such as marriage is always just a walk in the park. If this is true, could storytelling still be conducive or counterproductive to happiness?

I would be pleased to hear your thoughts.

 

 

Proverbial Friday – Something to ponder deeply about

~ Amanda

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Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too.

Departing from the African proverbs, this week we have some wise words from Sweden.

Swedish house
Swedish house

 

The house that is built after every man’s advice seldom gets a roof

– Swedish proverb

and from one of the greatest minds, of all time, a quote :

“Contentment is natural wealth, luxury is artificial poverty.”

– Socrates

 

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My thoughts on the Proverbs and Quotes –

Many of us give, and indeed, receive advice from all quarters in our lives, yet it isn’t always successful in implementation. When we tell others our problems, do we even want to hear their advice? At times it is most helpful, and yet, is it not better to discover the solution for ourselves? For it is about ourselves, and we know that person far better than anyone else, and in that process of problem-solving, become more accomplished at handling life’s future blindsides?

For contentment is what we all seek, in many and various forms.

Despite the Swedes best efforts, we do need a roof over our heads, and we do also need food in our bellies and fellow companions. But how much more do we realistically need to survive, given we can’t take material possessions with us, when we pass. 

How clever was Socrates to know that if we are not happy with our what we have today, we won’t be happier when what you have is doubled?

Do you agree?

Join in the discussion. I would be glad to hear your thoughts.

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Something to Ponder About

Røros – A Walk back in ‘Mine’

Røros

 

At latitude of 62 degrees North, in the Sør-Trondelag region of Norway, 620 – 675 metres above sea level, lies the copper mining town of Røros  – a UNESCO World Heritage site and a must see for tourists.

 

 

The town, itself, comprises traditional Norwegian wooden buildings from the 18th and 19th centuries, that are still owned and occupied by businesses and residents today.

The smelting house “Smeltehytta,” (now the Røros Museum), forms the major part of the world heritage site, and is surrounded by black slag heaps.

Furthermore, it lies adjacent to the iconic, picture postcard, white-washed masonry church dating from 1784, that stands as a sentinel overlooking the town and countryside. (See more about the church in a later post)

 

 

The landscape surrounding Røros, is one of great scenic beauty – snow capped mountains, alpine flora, log cabins. This photo was taken in early summer and there was still ice in the lake, yet it was a gorgeous, warm summer day.

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Lake Aursund

The largest lake, Aursund, which you will circumnavigate if you travel to Røros from Trondheim, (the nearest city) –a drive of about 2-3 hours, or 5-6 hours if you choose to  travel by train.

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Forbidding high country on the Norwegian Swedish border

 

History

Lying close to the Swedish border,  military action between Norwegians and Swedish forces was a common historical event in Røros, culminating in the Swedish forces burning the town in 1678 and 79.

The Norwegians rebuilt and a revenge, of sorts, was exacted by nature, in the winter of 1718, when 3000 Swedish soldiers died attempting to cross the border, into Sweden, via the mountain range near Røros.

 

 

The first traces of copper,  in the area, had been discovered at Rauhåmmåren, and by 1646, the first smelting shed had been constructed in Røros.  The same copper-mining company, ‘Røros Kobberverk’, operated the copper-works for 333 years from 1644 until it went bankrupt in 1977.

Museum

Røros Copper Mine
Smelting house

Today, 300 years of mining history is depicted in the Rørosmuseet Smelthytta (Røros Museum Smelting House). It was awarded the Best New Museum in Europe in 1990 and consists primarily, of a large permanent exhibit with full scale 1:10 models showing each part of the copper mining and production process, as well as family and cultural life, in this frontier style town.

English language audiotapes are available. Tours of the mine are also available.

If visiting, allow, at least, a good hour at least to see all the museum has to offer.

 

Artists Mecca

The mine may have closed, but tourists has another reason to visit Røros. Not only will they experience the authentic flavour and atmosphere of a 17th century mining town, but the town has re-invented itself as an meccas for artists and of all kinds and specialist food.

More about the some of the unusual creatives of Røros in the next post. Til then, Røros’ long history is Something to Ponder About

Linking to Restless Jo’s Monday Walks

 

 

Proverbial Thursday – Global Words of Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Valuable life lessons.  Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

So, with that in mind, each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying, and a Quote from different cultures and parts of the world, that I have found thought-provoking. I hope you think so too. I invite you to comment on your thoughts behind the meaning of these, often enigmatic, words.

You are very welcome to join in the discussion!

You can find previous Proverbial Thursday Quotes here – some of the discussions are fascinating.

city hall stockholm

In calm water, every ship has a good captain ~

Swedish Proverb

VAsa Museum

Although the proverb’s words did not help the ship:’Vasa’ on its maiden voyage, from Stockholm, in 1628! Read more about visiting Stockholm and what happened to the King’s ship here.

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The quote I have chosen this week, does not necessarily apply only to school students, but also to workers, and all who interact with others, or reside in a community. The student’s  words struck me as profound, especially for someone with much of her life ahead of her.

“It wasn’t the friendship, fights and drifts that broke us; it was if we allowed that to fester into deep grudges and acts of revenge.  It wasn’t completing the assessment pieces that made us; it was feeling stressed or so over them after Term 1 and yet repeating that process in Term 2, then Term 3, then Term 4.  And it wasn’t the embarrassment or judgment from people that broke us; it was whether we allowed that to shatter our confidence and self-belief.”

J Tinn – School Student 2016

The student’s words made me think it is not the misfortune or good news in itself, that affects our mood, it is how we perceive the words relative to our own sphere, how we individually interpret, accept or reject the words; how much we let the words get under our skin, or soak them up; how much we react to the words and what that reaction looks like. We can choose whether the words help or hinder us.

pulling out hair

Is this true? We always have a personal, inner choice on how we react, even when there seems no other option? I believe so.  For whilst we cannot control what others might or might not do, we can always control how we act and – react. Do you agree?

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And do you think the Swedish proverb has any relevance in today’s world or is it applicable only, to times gone by?

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Something to Ponder About

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