shadows
blogging

Friendly Friday Challenge – Shadows

Sandy’s prompt for Friendly Friday reminded me of a visit to the Skansen Museum in Stockholm,where I felt the presence of old world shadows.

In the midst of a Swedish winter, the shadowy silhouette of the bell tower in Stockholm’s Skansen Museum was an imposing and slightly daunting sight set against the crepuscular morning light.

Swedish farm houses were dark and the winters bitterly cold. Many families lived in the same house for generations and the darkest corners of the room echoed with imagined shadows of the past.

Skansen’s Farm labourers cottage

Taking refuge inside, farmers and their labourers would enjoy consuming a hearty meal, particularly at Christmas.

For those who have Swedish heritage, visiting Skansen is a way to bring history alive and feel more of a connection with the past.

Linking to Friendly Friday- Shadows

shadows

Sandy is hosting the blogging challenge which runs until Thursday, this week.

A new prompt will be released here at StPA, next Friday.

Traditional Art, Travel

Swedish Skansen Museum

Overlooking Stockholm, Skansen Open Air Museum is a walk back in history that every visitor should make when visiting Sweden.

Skansen is the first open-air museum and zoo in Sweden and is located on the island Djurgården in Stockholm, Sweden. It was opened on 11 October 1891 by Artur Hazelius to show the way of life in the different parts of Sweden before the industrial era.

In a few hours, oner can stroll back through time to pre-industrial Sweden and imagine life in the beautifully preserved collection of traditional buildings.

All levels of society are featured here from the humble bonded farmer to the wealthy Corn Chandler, a dealer in grains, whose quaint summerhouse is a postcard-worthy.

Summerhouse cottage of the Corn chandler

If you are visiting at Christmas and through early January, there are extra activities organized with attendants in period costume singing Christmas songs and dancing around the tree as well as reindeer sled rides for the children.

history
Head coverings for.both men and women, were a practical and significant feature of life

The Old Church in Skansen is reminiscent of a turbulent period in religious history. The Church in Sweden was heavily influenced by the traditions of Martin Luther whose idea was not to start a new religion, but rather to reform Christianity. He extolled the virtues of finding, “Salvation through Faith.” Although there are very old Swedish Churches dating back to the end of the Viking era with heavily decorated ceilings, later buildings were more austere in decoration.

Photography is encouraged throughout the museum, but the interiors of many buildings are quite dark and in order to preserve any painted objects, such as a splendid Swedish Mora clock, the use of a camera flash is prohibited. The clock at Skansen was painted in Swedish folk art style similar to the one below and dated back to 1799.

In years gone by, it was customary for art students to travel to Stockholm in order to learn to paint and later, return to the countryside to decorate household items and furniture for wealthy farmers, in typical folk art style.

sverige museet i vinter
Farmers cottage

Accompanying the collection of historic buildings is a small zoo, which would delight the younger members of the family, and features arctic animals such as reindeer, moose, lynx, bear and grey wolves.

Don’t forget to snap your panoramic shot, as the view from Skansen gives you an opportunity to capture the Stockholm skyline and city centre.

sweden
Stockholm and Sami Hutsami Tepee

I recommend the various lunch options nearby. You could easily spend the afternoon here visiting other attractions such as Grona Lund Amusement Park, Vasa or the ABBA museums and the Art Gallery.

Lunch options in the area range from cafes to a la carte restaurants. One of which claimed to serve the best salmon in the world so I just had to try it. Served with potato and dill it was definitely a ‘melt-in-the-mouth,’ flavour and the freshest salmon I have eaten. In archetypal Swedish style, a simple dessert of fresh raspberries with ice cream and raspberry sauce was a fitting complement to the meal.

sweden Malmø
Travel

Virtual Travel to Sweden

I wrote a guest post some years ago, for a travel blogger, about a favourite place that I had visited. As we cannot travel irl, virtual travel will have to do today. there is some formatting errors as it is written with the old editor. (Who uses that now?)

Choosing a topic for my favourite holiday destination, was both easy and difficult. Easy because I knew it would be somewhere in Scandinavia, (for those who know me, I hear you mumbling an audible, “of course,”) but difficult because I could only pick one Scandinavian country.

Each region of Scandinavia has its own beauty, personality and appeal and it is hard to choose one over them all. In today’s case, Sweden won out. Tomorrow I am sure it will be Denmark, and the next: Norway……

Sweden, or ‘Sverige’ (pronounced in Swedish svair-ri-ah), is one of my all-time favourites to visit because it is full of Nordic vitality, culture and unique sights.

Don’t let the threat of a harsh winter put you off a winter vacation in Sweden, because the warmer jet stream ensures that the winters in Scandinavia are no worse, and even sometimes better, than the American or Canadian version.

 

IMG_8896

I enjoyed “fika” ( Swedish coffee and cake ) in a traditional Swedish cafe

In southern Sweden, you’ll find a fast-paced modernity in the large, cosmopolitan cities, like Stockholm and Malmø, but you will delight in finding they are also peppered with ‘old world’ charm.

The central area of the country is where rural Sweden and the philosophy of  ‘Ikea’ at its best, with rolling green hills, a dusting of snow in Winter and a countryside dotted with ‘Falun’ red cottages, barns, medieval farms and quaint churches, some with amazing, intricately-painted ceilings dating back to medieval times.

You’ll also see age-old Swedish traditions alive and kicking, from one end of the country all the way to the other.

From painted horses in Dalarna to summers with wild ‘surstromming,’ (fermented fish), or Crayfish parties, or relaxing lazily on the west coast resorts, where a tourist-driven, laid back lifestyle predominates. A local beach on the Bohuslan coast might be a lump of bare sun-soaked rock, striking, attractive, yet it is appealing and extremely popular to visitors and Swedes alike.

And don’t forget the far north, where a Swedish winter adventure might include viewing the northern lights, going dog sledding, snowmobiling or experiencing a mix of arctic and Sami culture that transforms a cold, dark winter into a snowy, white wonderland one might associate more with Santa Claus and his elves.

Dalahest - Traditional horses
Traditional painted horses from Dalarna in Sweden

You might ask:What made this place so memorable?’

The Swedish people themselves have a proud and varied history, are gregarious, hard-working and cannot go for more than a few hours without ‘Fika’: coffee and cake.

Just my kind of people!

You will find cafes and bakery everywhere serving Fika, and this experience coupled with a kanelbolle, or cinnamon bun, made my Swedish experience memorable.

So what are the top ten sights/activities for this destination?

1. Vasa MuseumStockholm:

See the ill-fated, triple-decked centuries old galleon that sank on its maiden voyage in the Stockholm harbour, replete with cannons, crew and gold-encrusted decorations.   Nearby is the Nordic Museum that is also worth a look.    

                                                            

Vasa Museum
Vasa Museum

Nordic Museum
Nordic Museum

IMG_02392. Skansen/Liseberg – Stockholm: an open-air museum with vintage Swedish houses, barns, dancing demonstrations and delicious traditional food. Stockholm’s Zoo is also located there, so if you yearn to see moose, reindeer, or a bear, you can do that when you visit Skansen.  Then, burn off the extra calories on the rides at neighbouring Liseberg, Stockholm’s oldest amusement park.

Skansen
Skansen – open air museum – Stockholm

         

 3. Gamla StanStockholm’s Old Town: a mecca for foodies. Commencing at the Royal palace, the “Old Town” consists of narrow alleyways, cute cafes, oh- so photogenic painted terrace houses, and shops full of traditional souvenirs to take home. Money exchanges/plenty of ATM’s are conveniently located here to help you on your mission!

Gamla Stan
Gamla Stan

 

 

  1. Radhuset Stockholm’s Town Hall: like a ‘mentos sweet’: plain and dull on the outside, magnificent on the inside. The Town Hall, built in the 1930s, is not only the venue for the Nobel Prize ceremonies; it has a Council chamber with a unique roof. The roof’s design was inspired by an upturned and decorated hull of a Viking longboat and the Town Hall also has a third reception room that is equivalent to an ancient Egyptian Pharoah’s temple. Surprising, and a definite ‘must-see’. Guided tours usually operate daily.town hall stockholmcity hall stockholm

 

  1. Stockholm archipelago – A leisurely boat trip past idyllic islands, the occasional fortress and stunningly beautiful nature. A photographer’s dream on a good day. Departs from Stockholm or Stromstad. Alternatively, if you are not a water baby:  the sites mentioned in the Stieg Larsson’s ‘Millenium’ trilogy are a great way to see more of Stockholm. There is an easy D.I.Y. walking tour of Stockholm. Maps available at the tourist office.

 

Stockholm
Stockholm

 

  1. Malmø – Skane, Southern Sweden: see the impressive “Turning torso” building, a feat of modern engineering; and Malmohus, a renaissance castle; as well as historic buildings in the Malmø Town Square including the Town Hall from 1547, Hotel Kramer and the old pharmacy: Apoteket. If you still have breath or run out of things to do, take a thirty-minute train ride and you are in Copenhagen, Denmark.

 

Malmø
Malmøhus

 

  1. Ystad –Skane, Southern Sweden: trace Detective Kurt Wallander’s footsteps, (from Henning Mankell’s famous novels and TV series). There’s loads of half-timbered cottages with thatch roofs too.

 

  1. Stromstad –Bohuslan, a beachside town on the west coast – see the Town Hall with its quirky history, take in drop-dead gorgeous views out to the archipelago,  and try the must-have Buffet lunch at Lalaholmen hotel.  You SO don’t want to miss the dessert. But you may want to skip the ‘surstromming’, (a fermented very smelly fish)and just party in the lively atmosphere and long hours of daylight hours in summer, or use Stromstad as a launchpad, for a high-speed boat trip to spend a day in Norway. 

    Stromstad
    Stromstad
  1. Lappland: Skellefteaa – track and hunt wild reindeer in their native habitat, go sledding, skiing or snowmobiling, or see Sweden’s oldest wooden bridge, and an utterly impressive Domkirke Cathedral, (a place of pilgrimage for centuries) and the pilgrim’s traditional cottages nearby.

 reindeer tracking

Skellefteå

Skellefteå Domkirke
Skellefteaa Domkirke

 10. Catch a glimpse of the mysterious Northern lights, or ski from February to June at Riksgransen, where, if you are lucky you may see the testing of pre-production European model cars that occurs in spring on the, still frozen, Arctic lakes.

frozen lake sweden

 If I could go again I would…

Spend more time relaxing on the Bohuslan coast, on a long summer night, visit Gotland to see the Viking relics and feast on Swedish delicacies such as reindeer, cloudberries, salmon, ‘Vasterbotten’ cheese and ‘Filmjolk.’

IMG_0175 unter - swedish supermarket

Is a Swedish holiday for you? Something for you to ponder about?

Community, Philosophy

Sunday Sayings – Contentment

Bättre en fågel i handen än tio i skogen.

Better a bird in hand then 10 in the forest.

Swedish Proverb
bird

“Be thankful for what you have; you’ll end up having more.

If you concentrate on what you don’t have, you will never, ever have enough”

― Oprah Winfrey

Are you constantly seeking contentment?

Marc and Angel stated that there are two variations of contentment in life – fleeting and enduring. 

“The fleeting type is derived from instants of material comfort, while the enduring type is attained through the gradual growth of your mind.  At a glimpse it might be difficult to decipher one from the other, but as time rolls on it becomes vividly obvious that the latter is far superior.

Enduring contentment sustains itself through life’s ups and downs, because through them your mind remains confident and at peace.  On the other hand, when life’s fleeting changes have the ability to ruffle your mind into a frenzy, even the most elaborate physical comforts won’t make you any happier for very long. “

“We are not rich by what we possess but by what we can do without.”

― Immanuel Kant

Several years ago, I created ‘Proverbial Friday’ on my blog, which morphed into Sunday Sayings.
I became fascinated with traditional proverbs and sayings, their metaphorical layers and the many different interpretations found within just a few, succinct words. I marveled at their ability to transcend race, religion, opinions and age.
They offer us knowledge; knowledge that is passed to us in much the same way relay runners might pass a baton. Once it’s handed over, it is up to us what we do with it and how we pass it on.

Something to Ponder About this sunday.

iceland
Book review

The Darkest Room – Johan Theorin

Imagine a bitterly cold Swedish winter, on the bleak treeless coastal island, in an old manor house built from the wood of a wrecked ship in which scores of sailors drowned, where one’s only neighbours are 2 lighthouses, one of which no longer works and is haunted. Is there any better location for a thriller/murder mystery?

Iceland

I’d not heard of this author before, but I have had more opportunity to read lately and picked up this Swedish novel, set on the very real Swedish island of Oland, in mythical locations. This is the world that the character, Joakim Westin has recently moved to, with his family of wife and two small children. The grand plans to renovate and rejuvunate the manor house is destroyed when shortly after their move, one of the family drowns not far from the house.

Joakim struggles to come to terms with the death, while others on the island become immersed in a struggle of their own. One is a young female police officer finding her feet in a new beat, and another is a young man involved in petty crimes, who becomes haunted by his the results of his misdemeanors. As Christmas approaches, a sageful relative of the police officer tells of an old Swedish folk tale where the dead come back to visit the living on the darkest night of the year. What does this mean for Joakim, and his family, isolated in the manor house during one of the worst blizzard’s of the decade?

Atmosphere by the bucketload is what you get from Theorin’s spine- tingling novel. Whilst it remains a murder mystery, those who like supernatural touches or ghostly happenings would get their kicks from the story. Theorin weaves a mystery into believable occurrences, yet manages to get the reader to sympathize with the bereaved man and remain hungry for the next chapter.

Theorin also gets into the head of the protaganist and takes the reader on a psychological journey of grief. Themes of retribution/karma also simmer under the surface when it becomes clear what happened to Ethel.

emotion

Despite a head splitting migraine, I was determined to finish the book, such was the effect this story had on me. Be warned….

The good: Dark windswept landscape expertly described. You are there in the blinding snow along with the characters.

The bad:   Would a father leave his children alone?

The ugly:  Depiction of alcoholic tarts…….

Rating out of 10: 9

Community

Sunday Sayings – Love

snow cottage sweden sverige skellefteaa
Skellefteå – Sweden

Mostly anonymous, proverbs are a portal through time to generations past and echo a diverse range of cultures.

They speak of the experiences of many lessons learned and the wisdom from thousands of lives already lived.

They offer us knowledge; knowledge that is passed to us in much the same way relay runners might pass a baton. Once it’s handed over, it is up to us what we do with it and how we pass it on.

weekly proverb

“Love me when I least deserve it,

because that’s when I really need it”

~Swedish Proverb

heart love affection care


weekly quote

They say a person needs three things in life

in order to be truly happy:

someone to love,

something to do

and something to hope for –

Tom Bodett

heart light

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment.

Everyone’s opinion is important. What is yours?

~Amanda

sunday sayings at something to ponder about
Community

Sunday Sayings – Worrying

Weekly Proverb

“Worry often gives a small thing a big shadow”

~Swedish Proverb
emotion

Weekly Quotes

Worry does not empty tomorrow of its sorrow. It empties today of its strength.

~Corrie Ten Boom
lonely

How something ends up never depends on how much you worry about it

~ Unknown

Worrying can become a habitual way of responding to triggers.

  • Some of us feel safer if we worry about something.
  • Others feel worrying is a way of caring about someone dear.
  • We might think we get better at solving problems or become motivated by worry.
  • Worrying helps us to feel prepared for potential outcomes.

None of these are very accurate!  Worrying does not prepare us for anything. 

pensive thoughful looking upward

What do you make of this week’s sayings.

Are you a worrier?

How do you overcome worry?

Do you think worry have a beneficial use in our lives?

Everyone’s opinion is valid.
What is yours?

I invite you to leave a comment or share your views on Sunday Sayings.

Words of Wisdom

Several years ago, I created ‘Proverbial Friday’ on my blog.

I became fascinated with traditional proverbs, quotes and sayings, their metaphorical layers and the many different interpretations found within just a few, succinct words. I marveled at their ability to transcend race, religion, opinions and age.

They offer us knowledge; knowledge that is passed to us in much the same way relay runners might pass a baton. Once it’s handed over, it is up to us what we do with it and how we pass it on.

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Community

Proverbial Friday – Judging

Weekly Quote

Peace of Mind comes from a change in Attitude, NOT a change in circumstances
- Anon


When we judge or criticize others, we create distance between us, but if we stop judging and analyzing people, we get closer to them.

The Taoists say, ” it is possible to appreciate people for their uniqueness – like you might enjoy a certain song.

You don’t have to analyse and pull it apart.”

Criticism and judging is hammered into us at school, and is particularly good for analyzing literature and scientific thought; however, is much less useful in our everyday life and creates unwanted tension.

If we judge people and situations and complain about others, we sabotage our own peace of mind in that we allow ourselves to be disturbed that things are not as they “should be.” The resultant tension often means we search for a way to control external uncontrollable circumstances. Nurturing  flexibility and acceptance makes it easier to just let things be.

Dalahest - Traditional horses
Traditional painted horses from Dalarna in Sweden

Weekly Proverb – Sweden

sweden snow
sweden snow

När man talar om trollen!… (så står de i farstun)

– Swedish Proverb

Translation: When you talk about trolls!… (they stand in the hall).

(When the subject of a conversation unexpectedly shows up/happens.)

What do you think about critical opinion and the Swedish proverb.

Is it relevant to our daily life?

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment below.

Everyone’s opinion is valid.

What is yours?


Proverbial Friday – always Something to Ponder About
Community

Proverbial Friday

 

I find River boats artthere to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned.

Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Weekly Proverb

 

“Man ska inte köpa grisen i säcken”

One shouldn’t buy the pig in the sack

 Swedish Proverb

 

Is this proverb a caution similar to suggesting that a ‘buyer beware?” A warning against buying items, sight unseen? Or could there be a deeper hidden layer of meaning?

Weekly Quotes

“If you don’t stick to your values when they’re being tested, they’re not values:

they’re just hobbies”

-Jon Stewart

 

and this:

Social comparison is the thief of happiness. 

You could spend a lifetime worrying about what others have,

but it wouldn’t get you anything

~ Marc and Angel

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment.

Everyone’s opinion is important. What is yours?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

~ Amanda from Something to Ponder About

 

Community

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader.

River boats art

Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

 

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.

 

I hope you will too.

 

 

 

Continuing with the present theme of Swedish proverbs, I found this thought provoking proverb. Why would a good man cope better?  Would not a devious, conniving man, or woman, succeed too?  But, of course, there is a price to pay for ill – gotten gains, isn’t there?  Is this what the proverb refers to, do you think?

 

“Bra karl reder sig själv ” – 

(A) good man will cope on his own ~ Swedish Proverb

 

sweden torg

 

Coping and being self-reliant is a goal many of us have, but failing to cope or, at least, being unhappy might also provide us with opportunities to learn, according to Bill Gates.

 

“Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning.”Bill Gates

 

window-1231892_1280
CC0 Creative Commons

 

Do you agree with the Microsoft wiz?

 

Join in the discussion by leaving a comment below.

seagull-sky-holiday-bird-56618.jpeg

Proverbial Friday – Surely something to ponder about.

Community

Proverbial Friday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Friday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

raindrops

 

“When it rains soup, the poor man has no spoon.”

– Swedish Proverb

 

 

 

Dalahest - Traditional horses

 

 

 

Storytelling is the most powerful way to put ideas into the world today.”

– Robert McKee

 

guitar art

 

Robert McKee, A Fulbright Scholar, is the most sought after screenwriting lecturer around the globe. He has dedicated the last 30 years to educating and mentoring screenwriters, novelists, playwrights, poets, documentary makers, producers, and directors internationally. However, McKee has been criticized for teaching screenwriting without ever having a script of his made into a film.

 

Thinking about the Swedish proverb, does it seem a little shallow or simplistic, to you? Poor communities can after all, have a very rich life, albeit not in materialistic or monetary terms. Is the proverb referring only to financial matters ?

And what do you make of Robert McKee’s words? Media can be used as a propaganda tool but is the media capable of suggestions of thought? Storytelling can teach us lessons in allegorical form, but can it also lead to misconceptions  by the reader or viewer? Take, for example, teenage girls who think they should look and act a certain way, based on watching mainstream TV? Do you think that media is purely entertainment value for the discerning viewer and that entertainment value can be separated from unrealistic impressions that relationships should be always be blissful, and an institutions such as marriage is always just a walk in the park. If this is true, could storytelling still be conducive or counterproductive to happiness?

I would be pleased to hear your thoughts.

 

 

Proverbial Friday – Something to ponder deeply about

~ Amanda

cropped-somethingto-ponderabout.jpg

 

daisy
Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you think so too.

Departing from the African proverbs, this week we have some wise words from Sweden.

Swedish house
Swedish house

 

The house that is built after every man’s advice seldom gets a roof

– Swedish proverb

and from one of the greatest minds, of all time, a quote :

“Contentment is natural wealth, luxury is artificial poverty.”

– Socrates

 

IMAG0692

 

My thoughts on the Proverbs and Quotes –

Many of us give, and indeed, receive advice from all quarters in our lives, yet it isn’t always successful in implementation. When we tell others our problems, do we even want to hear their advice? At times it is most helpful, and yet, is it not better to discover the solution for ourselves? For it is about ourselves, and we know that person far better than anyone else, and in that process of problem-solving, become more accomplished at handling life’s future blindsides?

For contentment is what we all seek, in many and various forms.

Despite the Swedes best efforts, we do need a roof over our heads, and we do also need food in our bellies and fellow companions. But how much more do we realistically need to survive, given we can’t take material possessions with us, when we pass. 

How clever was Socrates to know that if we are not happy with our what we have today, we won’t be happier when what you have is doubled?

Do you agree?

Join in the discussion. I would be glad to hear your thoughts.

Blog

Something to Ponder About

Røros
Community

Røros – A Walk back in ‘Mine’

 

At latitude of 62 degrees North, in the Sør-Trondelag region of Norway, 620 – 675 metres above sea level, lies the copper mining town of Røros  – a UNESCO World Heritage site and a must see for tourists.

 

 

The town, itself, comprises traditional Norwegian wooden buildings from the 18th and 19th centuries, that are still owned and occupied by businesses and residents today.

The smelting house “Smeltehytta,” (now the Røros Museum), forms the major part of the world heritage site, and is surrounded by black slag heaps.

Furthermore, it lies adjacent to the iconic, picture postcard, white-washed masonry church dating from 1784, that stands as a sentinel overlooking the town and countryside. (See more about the church in a later post)

 

 

The landscape surrounding Røros, is one of great scenic beauty – snow capped mountains, alpine flora, log cabins. This photo was taken in early summer and there was still ice in the lake, yet it was a gorgeous, warm summer day.

aursund
Lake Aursund

The largest lake, Aursund, which you will circumnavigate if you travel to Røros from Trondheim, (the nearest city) –a drive of about 2-3 hours, or 5-6 hours if you choose to  travel by train.

Norway sweden
Forbidding high country on the Norwegian Swedish border

 

History

Lying close to the Swedish border,  military action between Norwegians and Swedish forces was a common historical event in Røros, culminating in the Swedish forces burning the town in 1678 and 79.

The Norwegians rebuilt and a revenge, of sorts, was exacted by nature, in the winter of 1718, when 3000 Swedish soldiers died attempting to cross the border, into Sweden, via the mountain range near Røros.

 

 

The first traces of copper,  in the area, had been discovered at Rauhåmmåren, and by 1646, the first smelting shed had been constructed in Røros.  The same copper-mining company, ‘Røros Kobberverk’, operated the copper-works for 333 years from 1644 until it went bankrupt in 1977.

Museum

Røros Copper Mine
Smelting house

Today, 300 years of mining history is depicted in the Rørosmuseet Smelthytta (Røros Museum Smelting House). It was awarded the Best New Museum in Europe in 1990 and consists primarily, of a large permanent exhibit with full scale 1:10 models showing each part of the copper mining and production process, as well as family and cultural life, in this frontier style town.

English language audiotapes are available. Tours of the mine are also available.

If visiting, allow, at least, a good hour at least to see all the museum has to offer.

 

Artists Mecca

The mine may have closed, but tourists has another reason to visit Røros. Not only will they experience the authentic flavour and atmosphere of a 17th century mining town, but the town has re-invented itself as an meccas for artists and of all kinds and specialist food.

More about the some of the unusual creatives of Røros in the next post. Til then, Røros’ long history is Something to Ponder About

Linking to Restless Jo’s Monday Walks