Soender Felding, Denmark
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Poetry Challenge – OctPoWriMo

The following poem is the one I have always liked and I wrote it so quickly – it must be that writing from the heart, makes a difference.

I am submitting it for the October poetry month challenge. A little late but I have been occupied with hosting my own poetry challenge, which ends this month, well, last month, now that today is officially November.

You can check out another of my poems here/2018/11/01/poetry-challenge-october-prompt-2/

architecture boats buildings canal
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

‘Still in my Heart’

Home Sweet Home afar from me,
At least 10 hours over sky and sea,

A fairy tale land of red and white,
of rain, and wind, and winter nights.

Yet still you send my heart a flutter,
And here, I can but get your butter,

Cos’ when I’m sad and feeling down,
You can lift my spirits like a children’s clown.

What is this strange longing and connection,
I feel for such warm and fuzzy introspection?

Of land and family long dead and passed,
Would they think me to be completely daft?

Yet I am of them, and they are of me,
This continual spreading of the family tree.

The branches are like the ancient Birch
Resilient, pervasive til one drops off the Perch.

If only I could stay or perhaps visit more often,
But my responsibilities and circumstances rarely soften.

So I must dream and wish and be ever so frugal,
And if I can’t afford to travel there, there is always Google!

~ The Sunshine Elves

Andrea Heiberg
Poetry Dedication:

In memory and thanks for a great friend, Andrea Heiberg.

You are watching now from another place, I place I cannot yet go.

Just what are you thinking, I do wonder.

~Amanda

Stpa

Community

Poetry Challenge – October Reminder

October Prompt:

~ Write a poem to, or about, your future self.

How might you see yourself, or your life, in ten years time.

 

ask blackboard chalk board chalkboard
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

This prompt is merely a suggestion and you may choose a topic of your liking and still be included in the challenge.

Remember to add the tag A and I Poetry Challenge, to your post, so that I can link to your blog in the final end of month round up of contributors.

FINAL  MONTH FOR THE POETRY CHALLENGE

POST BEFORE 31ST OCTOBER to be INCLUDED in the CHALLENGE ROUND UP POST.

The challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will include writing tips and link backs for contributors. Beginner poet, hobbyist or Advanced writer We hope you will join in.

You can write in either language, however, please post a link back, and comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge. 

In this way, we can find you and read your poetry.

 

Have fun!

A and I Poetry Challenge

Something poetic to ponder About

Scrapydo2

Community

Poetry Challenge – September Round up

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

The Prompt for September was to write a Limerick or humorous poem.

Only five lines long, limerick poems have an ‘AABBA’ rhyme scheme.

 

Featured Poets – Colonialist’s Blog

 

 

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I do suppose that each season
Does come with a kind of a reason,
And most are quite fine,
But I draw the line
At seasons that have my toes freezin’!

 

~The Colonialist

 

 

Find more about the Colonialist here

 

 

Hester writes a real cracker, really capturing the essence of the limerick’s humor:

 

An OLD bird who LIVES at the COAST

Lied DOWN in the SUN and she DOZED

She THOUGHT a light TAN

Would CATCH her a MAN

But NOW she’s burnt CRISP as dry TOAST

 

~Hester

This is a really awesome limerick!!! I love it, and it has that memory making sing-song quality so that it sticks in one’s head for quite a while!!

 

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I invite you to read this month’s submissions for the A and I Poetry challenge   who have all done a fantastic job.

 

Poetry Challenge Contributors for September

 

Ju- Lyn  varied the theme of seasons in refashioning-rules  but also decided to give the limerick form a go, here. And I am very glad she did. The limerick is deceptively easy to write but difficult to convey a message in such few words. Ju-Lyn nailed it.

Manjamexi  – penned a cheeky limerick with beautiful illustrations of mouth-watering photographs of a Cypress field many incarnations through the seasons.

Ineke’s delightful limerick on the seasonal changes in New Zealand – Scrapydo2.wordpress.com

Abrie Joubert – writes in Afrikaans but copy paste this into google Translate or use the translator button and you will find some wonderful words.

Abrie’s post on the A and I Poetry Challenge inspired two other Afrikaans writers to write limericks in the comments of Abrie’s post:

Hesterleynel  – she is at it again! Well done, Hester.

Toortsie

Perdebytjie

Very well done to all of you!  The translations were a lot of fun to read! One word translated to diarrhoea!! Not sure that it was meant as such, but it certainly was humorous!!

Hester’s post inspired Vuurklip to contribute in Afrikaans,on Hester blog post here

Tafuzul  – submitted a surpise poem.  He asked me to choose his best poem for his entry this month. Find it here

If you have written a poem in September and would like a linkback included here, please comment below.

Host bloggers Amanda  from Australia at Something to Ponder About and

Ineke from New Zealand at scrapydo2.wordpress.com  jointly host the challenge.

Ineke mostly does the poetry in Afrikaans, while Amanda uses English.

The challenge is open to all, from first-timers up to well-advanced poets. Be sure to comment here so that we can find your poem for October and add you to the link up post at the end of this month.

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October is the final month for the Poetry Challenge.

Community

Poetry Challenge – October Prompt

A and I Poetry Challenge Hosts are a Blogger and Writer, from New Zealand, Ineke, of Scrapydo2 and Blogger from Australia, Amanda, of  Something to Ponder About.

Amanda and Ineke

Amanda’s Poetry challenge is  in English and Ineke’s Poetry Challenge is in Afrikaans, (with many translations in English). Everyone is welcome to join in. October is the final month of this challenge! Please do join in!

You can write in either language, however, please post a link back, and comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge.

For Full guidelines on joining in, click here.

 

October Prompt:

~ Write a poem to, or about, your future self.

How might you see yourself, or your life, in ten years time.

 

ask blackboard chalk board chalkboard
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

This prompt is merely a suggestion and you may choose a topic of your liking and still be included in the challenge.

Remember to add the tag A and I Poetry Challenge, to your post, so that I can link to your blog in the final end of month round up of contributors.

 

The challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will include writing tips and link backs for contributors. Beginner poet, hobbyist or Advanced writer We hope you will join in.

You can write in either language, however, please post a link back, and comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge. 

In this way, we can find you and read your poetry.

 

Have fun!

A and I Poetry Challenge

Something poetic to ponder About

Scrapydo2

Community

Poetry Challenge – September Prompt

Rothenburg wall
Rothenburg, Germany

September Poetry Prompt – Seasons

 

Write a limerick poem on the change of the season and post on your blog before 28th September. If you live in the Northern hemisphere, write about the onset of Autumn. Those living in the South, including Ineke and Amanda, write about the onset of Spring.

A Limerick is a humorous poem wherein the first line sets up the character(s) and setting, so the reader knows right away who/what the story is about.

Only five lines long, limerick poems have an ‘AABBA’ rhyme scheme.

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

Hosts Blogger and writer from New Zealand, Ineke fromscrapydo2.wordpress.com and Blogger, Amanda from Something to Ponder About, are jointly hosting a Poetry Challenge.

Amanda’s challenge is  in English and Ineke’s is in Afrikaans, (translations in English).

The challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will run from March to October, 2018 and will include writing tips and link backs for contributors. Beginner poet, hobbyist or Advanced writer We hope you will join in.

You can write in either language, however, please post a link back, and comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge. 

In this way, we can find you and read your poetry.

Here are last month’s contributors.

For Full guidelines on joining in with the A and I Poetry Challenge, click here.

Stpa

Community

Poetry Challenge – August Heart Poems

A and I Poetry Challenge Hosts are a Blogger and Writer, from New Zealand, Ineke, of Scrapydo2 and Blogger from Australia, Amanda, of  Something to Ponder About.

Amanda and Ineke

Amanda’s Poetry challenge is  in English and Ineke’s Poetry Challenge is in Afrikaans, (with many translations in English). Everyone is welcome to join in.

You can write in either language, however, please post a link back, and comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge.

For Full guidelines on joining in, click here.

Hearts on waterfeature (Small)
August – Heart Poem

 

Feature Poem for August

 

This month’s feature poet is Steph, from the blog, Stories and Things Like That.  I really like the repetition Steph uses in this poem and how the shape reinforces and emphasizes the touching memories of a loved one.

 

heart

 

 

Blogger Submissions for August

 

The prompt in August was to write a poem or format a poem with a Heart theme.

We had some wonderful interpretations of this theme, so please do hop around and check them all out.

  • Hesterleynel  writes in both Afrikaans and English, which is no easy feat and cleverly uses a heart format to communicate her words.

 

 

  • Ju- Lyn writes an exquisite Somonka.  Just as two souls are intwined in love, Ju-Lyn has intwined Two Tanka poems about the power of Love.

 

  • Yvette at priorhouse.blog delights us with eye -pleasing photographs  and a fun heart shaped format to accompany her writing.

 

  • Ineke at  scrapydo2 writes a touching poem about love, loss and forgiveness

    (Insert into Google translate for English)

 

  • Amanda  aused a heart graphic and rhyme to enhance this love poem here

 

  • Mammasquirrel presents a poem honoring her faith and love of the Divine.

 

  • Manja writes a poetic story of love, separation, and what’s more, it comes beautifully illustrated  with photographs.

 

  • Tafazul writes with honesty and directness in his poem for August.

 

 

Please let me know if you submitted a poem during August, and the link is not listed here.

Sometimes pingbacks do not work as they should.

~ Amanda

cropped-stpa1.jpg

 

 

Community

Poetry Challenge – August Prompt and Writing Resources

A and I Poetry Challenge-  Tips on Writing and Prompt for August – see below

Hosts Blogger and writer from New Zealand, Ineke from scrapydo2.wordpress.com and Blogger, Amanda from Something to Ponder About, are jointly hosting the A and I Poetry Challenge in English and in Afrikaans, in the WordPress community.

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The challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will run from March to October, 2018.

You can write in either language but please post a link back or comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge.

Each month we will post poetry writing tips, (see this month’s below) and link-backs to those who contributed by posting a poem with the Tag  A and I Poetry Challenge. on their blog.

Beginner poet, hobbyist or Advanced writer – we hope you will join in with us.

For Full guidelines click here.

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

August PromptWrite a Heart poem

 

This might be a poem with lines written in the shape of a heart, or a poem about love, getting to the heart of a problem, about  folks wearing their hearts on their sleeves, or someone showing a lot of heart in competitions.

Post on your blog on or before 30th August, 2018 to be included in the link-backs for August.  The prompt is merely a suggestion and any topic is welcome.

Hearts on waterfeature (Small)
Write a Heart Poem in August

August Poetry Writing Tips

Finding inspiration to write poetry isn’t always easy or may not come automatically to many of us. Sometimes, our minds just get stuck for the right word. Or you can feel the word on the tip of your tongue but cannot get it out?

There are loads of tools on the net to help you in this sticky situation.

This month we look at some sites to help us find inspiration and words for our Poetry.

RhymeZone

The most popular rhyming dictionary is RhymeZone. Enter the word you need a rhyme for and Rhymezone returns multiple words that rhyme. RhymeZone also has some useful advanced features. If you want to find words that rhyme with love, just enter “love” at Rhymezone and you will get responses for one syllable and multi-syllable rhyming words. You can also search for synonyms or even definitions with this site.

Rhymes Lexemic

This site gives you options to vary the number of syllables and use a pronunciation search as opposed to one that searches on correct spelling alone.

Rhymebrain

This site gives you options in other languages

www.festisite.com/

allows you to search by tag, rhyme and submit your creation online so you can read others’ poems for inspiration.

www.b-rhymes.com/

This site gives you words that sound good together even if don’t technically rhyme.

More Rhyming Dictionary Sites

 

St P A

Community

Poetry Challenge Roundup for July

July is a month where many in both hemispheres take holidays, the temperate south freezes a little, while the subtropical south basks in dry warm daytime temps, and the temperate north experiences its long daylight hours of summertime. Great for relaxing and taking it easy. Perhaps some of our other contributors are also on holiday.

So I invite you to take a look at this month’s submissions who join in with the

A and I Poetry challenge for this month.

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

The Prompt for July was to: –

Turn on the radio to any channel.

Write a poem inspired by the first thing you hear

(lyrics to a song, a commercial, etc.)

 

sound speaker radio microphone
Photo by Gratisography on Pexels.com

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Featured Poet – Tafazul Mattoo

Tafazul is an engineering student from Kashmir who loves to draw and write. His poetry is so very interesting to read. You can find more of his work at his blog, here.

Not sure if he should begin,
frightened about the endings.
He dipped his brush in the air filled with melancholy,
painting his chaos on her heart.
She followed the chaos.

Lucerne lights

its a labyrinth

that is what she thought
only frightened about the beginnings,
but they both were stuck in a maze

at different dead ends.

_Tafazul Mattoo

 

I am including another link to a poem of Tafazul’s here as it is definitely worth a read!

tafazulsblog.wordpress.com/2018/06/25/nail-in-the-coffin

Ju – Lyn is celebrating with lots of luscious imagery here – purplepumpernickelblog.wordpress.com/

Manja took us on a trip to Trieste – manjameximovie3.wordpress.com/

Amanda at Penpunt writes bilingually in Afrikaans and English, with her poem that  makes readers think more deeply about the back story of conflict in her submission. A must read.

Jolene from So much to Tell you shines a light amongst the shadows with her poem here

 

If you have written a poem in July and would like a link included here, please leave a comment.

August Poetry Prompt posted next week here and on scrapydo2.wordpress.com

 

 

St P A

Trondheim
Community

Poetry Challenge for July

The A and I Bilingual Poetry Challenge runs each month until October.

The prompt for July is:

Turn on the radio to any channel.

Write a poem inspired by the first thing you hear

(lyrics to a song, a commercial, etc.)

This is my contribution.

 

A Mother’s Lament

So innocent, and vital, that smiley young boy,

With giggles and laughs, so charmingly coy.

Growing so tall after you donned that uniform;

Jumping so eagerly at war, which the suited men had spawned.

At home here we hear of the deathly horror you’ve seen,

It seems like everything turned black, when you turned 19.

Half a man returned home; as your soul is still there.

Seeing you broken is more than a mother can bear.

Each day, the gulf between us slowly widening,

as you keep running from the shadows, there’s no denying.

No more giggles, no smiles and never a laugh;

I don’t understand why you avoid photographs.

You close down any talk, you’re consumed with hate,

War’s legacy sinks down on us all, like a lead plate.

But my clock’s running down as time’s marching on,

I  only hope for small reconciliations, before I’m long gone.

I see that smiley young face in the photo on the bureau,

realizing sadly, he’s a stranger, I once used to know.

Amanda – July 2018

For the Afrikaans version of the Poetry Challenge – Visit Ineke at   scrapydo2.wordpress.com

 


 

 

Instructions for Joining the Poetry Challenge:

Sign up by leaving a comment on this post, so we know you are interested.

Ineke and I will post a poetry prompt and writing tips and links, around 1st day of each month.

You might need to follow our blogs so that the posts show up in your WP reader.

  • Using your own idea,  or the monthly prompt supplied, write a post with a poem, either fun or serious and post before the 27th day of that month.
  • Include in your post a link or pingback to both:

  scrapydo2.wordpress.com

 Something to Ponder About – forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com

  • Please add the tag A and I Poetry Challenge on YOUR BLOG POST.
  • As ping backs sometimes don’t work, please also leave a comment at Ineke’s blog, scrapydo2.wordpress.com and Amanda’s blog, Something to Ponder About, with the url link to YOUR blog post on the challenge post for that month.   N.B. If you do this, others can find their way to your challenge post and create a supportive community too.
  • Include the Poetry Challenge badge in your post, if you so wish. (optional)

Community

Poetry Writing Tips and May Challenge

Poetry Writing Tips included below:-

Time is almost up for posting poems for the A and I Poetry Challenge for the month of  May. Have you written your poem, yet?

Post a poem with a linkback to my blog and Ineke’s before the 28th May, so I can easily find it and include it in the next monthly Poetry Challenge post.

 Poetry Challenge –  May Prompt

*Write a poem using this photograph or one of your own as inspiration.

 

N.B. If you choose to use your own photo, please post the photo along with the poem.

 

You will find the full post on the May prompt and guidelines here

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

Poetry Writing Tips

I will discuss more about using concrete language in poetry next month but here is a taste to get you thinking and writing in a more concrete way.

Tip: Use concrete language instead of abstract language

The key to writing great poetry is to write focused, concrete poetry. But many beginning poets write poetry based around wide themes such as love, life, and anger, generalizing their writing.

By using strong language, active verbs instead of passive verbs and concrete language instead of abstract, you can capture a reader’s interest and captivate a reader’s imagination. Poetry, as something others read, should be at its best interactive, and at its worse, straight forward and clear.

Here is an example:

Abstract vs concrete Example 1

 

Concrete words describe things that people experience with their senses.

  • orange
  • warm
  • cat

A person can see orange, feel warm, or hear a cat.

Poets use concrete words help the reader get a “picture” of what the poem is talking about. When the reader has a “picture” of what the poem is talking about, he/she can better understand what the poet is talking about.

Abstract words refer to concepts or feelings.

  • liberty
  • happy
  • love

“Liberty” is a concept, “happy” is a feeling, and no one can agree on whether “love” is a feeling, a concept or an action.

A person can’t see, touch, or taste any of these things. As a result, when used in poetry, these words might simply fly over the reader’s head, without triggering any sensory response. Further, “liberty,” “happy,” and “love” can mean different things to different people. Therefore, if the poet uses such a word, the reader may take a different meaning from it than the poet intended.

Change Abstract Words Into Concrete Words

To avoid problems caused by using abstract words, use concrete words.

Example: “She felt happy.”

This line uses the abstract word “happy.” To improve this line, change the abstract word to a concrete image. One way to achieve this is to think of an object or a scene that evokes feelings of happiness to represent the happy feeling.

Improvement: “Her smile spread like red tint on ripening tomatoes.”

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

Writing poetry is something to ponder about

Community

Poetry Writing tips and Challenge for April

A and I Poetry Challenge

The A and I Poetry challenge is jointly hosted by Amanda and Ineke and is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will run from March to October, 2018.  We will share tips, offer a monthly prompt and post link backs to your published Poetry posts.

Please scroll down to see April’s poetry writing tips.

Instructions for joining are on the Poetry Challenge Page. You are very welcome to enter.

You can write any kind of poem that you like, as the prompt is merely a suggestion. Write in any language you like; it certainly doesn’t have to be in English. As this is a joint challenge with Ineke, she will also post the challenge in Afrikaans on her blog, so if that language suits you better, visit her here.

N.B. Please leave a comment here if you wish to be included in the Ping backs for this month.

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Poetry Challenge – April Prompt:

Write a poem that begins with the last thing you can remember someone saying to you yesterday. So if you can use that line two to three times throughout your poem.

 

Here is my Poem for April, inspired by Anie, who is one of my lovely readers: –

raindrops

 

Anie’s Rain

Like raindrops falling on to glass, I can not fight this force

that propels me forward to the end.

Like raindrops falling on to glass, it is fruitless to fight

what I cannot control.

Like raindrops falling on to glass, each journey individual, different from another.

Some hurry, sliding past, more sort of slow and steady,

one might falter at the start, coalesce or lose identity in groups,

Softly seductive, their lifetime short, imprint merely temporary,

All one substance.

One end.

~ Amanda

 

I can’t wait to read what you come up with this month. Don’t forget to link back to this post, on your poetry submission post, and leave a link and comment here so Ineke, Amanda and others can find your post.

 

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Poetry Tips

  • Write poetry as often as you can.
  • Designate a special notebook (or space in your notebook) for poetry writing.
  • Embrace metaphors but stay away from clichés ( I find this especially difficult!)
  • Don’t be afraid to write a bad poem. You can write a better one later.
  • Don’t back away from your thoughts or feelings. Express them!

 

Poetry Techniques –  Metaphor and Simile

Whilst there are many different styles for writing poetry, you may find one or more works for you. No matter what style or techniques you use, a poem can reach people in ways that other text can’t. It might be abstract or concrete but often it conveys strong emotions. Some common techniques used in poetry are onomatopoeia, alliteration, assonance, rhyming, simile and metaphor. Using metaphor and similes will bring imagery and concrete words into your writing.

The difference between simile and metaphor is explained here:

A metaphor is a statement that pretends one thing is really something else:

Example: “The lead singer is an elusive salamander.”

This phrase does not mean that the lead singer is literally a salamander. Rather, it takes an abstract characteristic of a salamander (elusiveness) and projects it onto the person. By using metaphor to describe the lead singer, the poet creates a much more vivid picture of him/her than if the poet had simply said “The lead singer’s voice is hard to pick out.”

Simile

A simile is a statement where you say one object is similar to another object. Similes use the words “like” or “as.”

Example: “He was curious as a caterpillar” or “He was curious, like a caterpillar”

This phrase takes one quality of a caterpillar and projects it onto a person. It is an easy way to attach concrete images to feelings and character traits that might usually be described with abstract words.

[Credit: Relo Pakistan]

Note: A simile is not any better or worse than a metaphor. The point to remember is that comparison, inference, and suggestion are all important tools of poetry; similes and metaphors are merely one of the tools in your poetry writing toolbox that will help.

Somethingto PonderAbout

Amanda ~

Something to Ponder About

 

Cylinders Beach Stradbroke Island
Community

Poetry Challenge and Entries for March

Fellow blogger and writer from New Zealand, Ineke from scrapydo2.wordpress.com and myself, Amanda from Something to Ponder About, are jointly hosting a poetry challenge in English and in Afrikaans, in the WordPress community.

The challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will run from March to October, 2018.  We will share tips, offer a monthly prompt and post link backs to your published Poetry posts.

Below are links and snippets of March’s wonderful Poetry entries. If I’ve missed anything, or anyone, please let me know. Pingbacks have been known to fail, so it is always helpful if you leave a comment on this post, to flag that you are joining in with the challenge.

 

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Poetry Entries for March

Take a trip through Poetry around the World. Browsing the entries will take you to Australia, South Africa, Slovenia, Denmark, India and Pakistan to read this month’s contributions to the A and I Bilingual Poetry Challenge.

  1. Ineke’s poem whispers in the mist – scrapydo2.wordpress.com
  2. Hester has written a beautiful Haiku of transient moments – hesterleynel.co.za
  3. Gerard from oosterman.wordpress.com/  writes about politics and war. You will find it posted in the comments of my challenge poetry challenge post.
  4. Eliza gave us a lovely reminder to be more accepting of our dearest ones – anitaelise.com/
  5. Amanda has a different take on friendship in hard times – wordpress.com/post/penpunt.wordpress.com
  6. Manja celebrated World Poetry Day with a poem about belonging and love –manjameximovie3.wordpress.com
  7. My contribution is about the potentials in life  – forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com
  8. For a young poet, Tanya has some salient words for everyone – https://pandapoet96.wordpress.com/
  9. Melvin tells us about the way surprising strength in everyday things –  https://melvinoommen.wordpress.com/2018/03/18/it-was/

 

“You told me not to be sad three times.

Does sea-sick mean to be sick of the sea?” – ManjaMexi

 

Would you like to join in this month?

  • Write and post a poem in any language you wish, during the month of April, adding the Tag: A and I Poetry Challenge to your post.
  • Leave a comment on Amanda’s and Ineke’s blog letting us know you are participating.
  • Please link back to this post, so we can find your entry.
  • The topic can be one of your choosing, however if you want to try a fun prompt, the suggestion for April will be posted on Something to Ponder About,  tomorrow, Monday 2nd April, 2018.

     

    Remember, you do not have to use this prompt, at all. The prompt is only there if you feel you want a topic to work from, or you find it hard to come up with an initial idea.

     

    A and I Poetry Challenge
    Ineke and I have created the above logo for the Poetry Challenge and you are very welcome to paste this onto your blog post or sidebar, so that others can also find out about the challenge, if you so wish.

    That is it!

    Oh and have fun writing!!

    N.B. Ineke and I will post link backs to the blogs who have joined in with the challenge in the poetry challenge post in the following month, so that you can all find each other’s blog posts and build a new poet’s community!

    Let us build a Poetry Community in WordPress.

    And if you haven’t had enough poetry yet, there is NaPoWriMo 

    StPA

    Something to ponder about

     

     
     
     
Community

Poetry Writing tips and Challenge #1

You don’t think you are a poet?

I don’t believe it! Writing poetry is something everyone can do.

Poetry is putting your own thoughts down on paper, so how can that be wrong?

Benefits of a Poetry Challenge

Poetry writing can be a great way to express deep-seated emotions in a constructive way, helping us to process their inner meanings and significance.

Then again, your poetry might just be a little bit of fun. Rhyming poetry for instance.

Fellow blogger and writer, Ineke from scrapydo2.wordpress.com and myself, Amanda from Something to Ponder About , are jointly hosting an upcoming poetry challenge in English and in Afrikaans, in the WordPress community.

You are invited to join in. See instructions below.

A and I Poetry Challenge

Poetry Writing Tips

 

Honour the miraculousness of the ordinary. What we very badly need to remember is that the things right under our noses are extraordinary, fascinating, irreplaceable, profound and just kind of marvellous.

Look at the things in the foreground and relish stuff that can lose its glow by being familiar. In fact, re-estranging ourselves to familiar things seems to be a very important part of what poetry can do. [Source: From http://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-29538180:]

On Using Rhyme: https://www.creative-writing-now.com/rhyme-schemes.html

Tips on Getting Started:

“The first step in any poem is coming up with something to write about. Don’t feel that you have to choose profound or “poetic” material. It’s easiest to write a good poem about something you know well, that you have experienced first-hand, or that you have nearby so that you can observe it carefully. This is because what makes the poem profound and interesting will be the hidden details or qualities you discover, or what the subject reminds you of, your unique perspective. With poems, as with other things (or so I hear), it’s not the size that matters, it’s what you do with it.In the beginning, you don’t have to worry about “style,” about writing in a “beautiful” or a “poetic” way. In fact, if you start to think about “being poetic,” it can distract you from what you’re actually writing about and hurt your poem.”

 

Challenge Hosts Amanda and Ineke

 

Why a Poetry Challenge?

Read more here here

 

What is it?

The Poetry challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers, and will run from March to October in 2018.

Each month we will post a prompt and helpful sites to getting started in poetry.

You can write in any language, it certainly doesn’t have to be in English.

Ineke will post the challenge in Afrikaans on her blog, so if that language suits you better, visit her here.

You Can write any kind of poem that you like. If you need inspiration to get you started:

The March Prompt:

Grab the closest book. Go to page 29. Write down 7 words that catch your eye. Use 5 of the words in a poem.

 

Here is my Poem for March.

 

ChristchurchPerhaps!

Perhaps, I will grow up to be a movie star or a nurse.

Perhaps, I’ll travel the world – when I’m all grown up –

Perhaps!

So perhaps, I will walk to school, run wild in the streets at weekends, have few time limits and even fewer parental eyes.

Perhaps, life will be simple and there will only ever be friends and enemies –

Perhaps!

But then, perhaps I will live a carefree life aboard a yacht floating the waterways  –

Perhaps, I will have a husband and five children and be up to my ears in snotty noses and wet nappies.

Perhaps!

Then, again, perhaps I will have an abusive spouse, end up penniless or in a hospital Emergency room,

losing my confidence and self esteem.

Perhaps, I will slowly rebuild my life and my identity, whilst forever remembering the scars.-

Perhaps!

And then perhaps, I will find a kindred soul, a kind family and be content.

Perhaps, I’ll find my passion in life that takes me places I never dreamed –

Perhaps!

So perhaps, it will be that I’ll face the sun so the shadows will fall behind me.

Perhaps, I will find that expectations and disappointment go hand in hand –

Perhaps!

Or perhaps, I’ll find that dementia steals away memories as I sit in an aged care facility, living out fantasies that won’t come to pass.

Perhaps, when my time is over,  I’ll make terms with the next journey –

Perhaps!

Or perhaps the mysteries and purpose of life will always be elusive.

Perhaps, just perhaps, there’s no certainty, only Perhaps.


Amanda

Now it is your turn to write –

Instructions for Joining the Poetry Challenge:

Sign up by leaving a comment on this post, so we know you are interested.

Ineke and I will post a poetry prompt and writing tips and links, around 1st day of each month.

You might need to follow our blogs so that the posts show up in your WP reader.

  • Using your own idea,  or the monthly prompt supplied, write a post with a poem, either fun or serious and post before the 27th day of that month.
  • Include in your post a link or pingback to both:

  scrapydo2.wordpress.com

 Something to Ponder About – forestwoodfolkart.wordpress.com

  • Add the tag A and I Poetry Challenge to your post.
  • As ping backs sometimes don’t work, please also leave a comment at Ineke’s blog, scrapydo2.wordpress.com and Amanda’s blog, Something to Ponder About, with the url link to YOUR blog post on the challenge post for that month.   N.B. If you do this, others can find their way to your challenge post and create a supportive community too.
  • Include the Poetry Challenge badge in your post, if you so wish. (optional)

 

That is it!

Oh, and have fun writing!! Any questions? Just ask.

Ineke and I will post link backs to the blogs who have joined in with the challenge in the poetry challenge post in the following month, so that you can all find each other’s blog posts and build a new poet’s community!!