Poetry Challenge – September Round up

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

The Prompt for September was to write a Limerick or humorous poem.

Only five lines long, limerick poems have an ‘AABBA’ rhyme scheme.

 

Featured Poets – Colonialist’s Blog

 

 

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I do suppose that each season
Does come with a kind of a reason,
And most are quite fine,
But I draw the line
At seasons that have my toes freezin’!

 

~The Colonialist

 

 

Find more about the Colonialist here

 

 

Hester writes a real cracker, really capturing the essence of the limerick’s humor:

 

An OLD bird who LIVES at the COAST

Lied DOWN in the SUN and she DOZED

She THOUGHT a light TAN

Would CATCH her a MAN

But NOW she’s burnt CRISP as dry TOAST

 

~Hester

This is a really awesome limerick!!! I love it, and it has that memory making sing-song quality so that it sticks in one’s head for quite a while!!

 

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I invite you to read this month’s submissions for the A and I Poetry challenge   who have all done a fantastic job.

 

Poetry Challenge Contributors for September

 

Ju- Lyn  varied the theme of seasons in refashioning-rules  but also decided to give the limerick form a go, here. And I am very glad she did. The limerick is deceptively easy to write but difficult to convey a message in such few words. Ju-Lyn nailed it.

Manjamexi  – penned a cheeky limerick with beautiful illustrations of mouth-watering photographs of a Cypress field many incarnations through the seasons.

Ineke’s delightful limerick on the seasonal changes in New Zealand – Scrapydo2.wordpress.com

Abrie Joubert – writes in Afrikaans but copy paste this into google Translate or use the translator button and you will find some wonderful words.

Abrie’s post on the A and I Poetry Challenge inspired two other Afrikaans writers to write limericks in the comments of Abrie’s post:

Hesterleynel  – she is at it again! Well done, Hester.

Toortsie

Perdebytjie

Very well done to all of you!  The translations were a lot of fun to read! One word translated to diarrhoea!! Not sure that it was meant as such, but it certainly was humorous!!

Hester’s post inspired Vuurklip to contribute in Afrikaans,on Hester blog post here

Tafuzul  – submitted a surpise poem.  He asked me to choose his best poem for his entry this month. Find it here

If you have written a poem in September and would like a linkback included here, please comment below.

Host bloggers Amanda  from Australia at Something to Ponder About and

Ineke from New Zealand at scrapydo2.wordpress.com  jointly host the challenge.

Ineke mostly does the poetry in Afrikaans, while Amanda uses English.

The challenge is open to all, from first-timers up to well-advanced poets. Be sure to comment here so that we can find your poem for October and add you to the link up post at the end of this month.

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October is the final month for the Poetry Challenge.

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Poetry Writing Tips and May Challenge

Poetry Writing Tips included below:-

Time is almost up for posting poems for the A and I Poetry Challenge for the month of  May. Have you written your poem, yet?

Post a poem with a linkback to my blog and Ineke’s before the 28th May, so I can easily find it and include it in the next monthly Poetry Challenge post.

 Poetry Challenge –  May Prompt

*Write a poem using this photograph or one of your own as inspiration.

 

N.B. If you choose to use your own photo, please post the photo along with the poem.

 

You will find the full post on the May prompt and guidelines here

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

Poetry Writing Tips

I will discuss more about using concrete language in poetry next month but here is a taste to get you thinking and writing in a more concrete way.

Tip: Use concrete language instead of abstract language

The key to writing great poetry is to write focused, concrete poetry. But many beginning poets write poetry based around wide themes such as love, life, and anger, generalizing their writing.

By using strong language, active verbs instead of passive verbs and concrete language instead of abstract, you can capture a reader’s interest and captivate a reader’s imagination. Poetry, as something others read, should be at its best interactive, and at its worse, straight forward and clear.

Here is an example:

Abstract vs concrete Example 1

 

Concrete words describe things that people experience with their senses.

  • orange
  • warm
  • cat

A person can see orange, feel warm, or hear a cat.

Poets use concrete words help the reader get a “picture” of what the poem is talking about. When the reader has a “picture” of what the poem is talking about, he/she can better understand what the poet is talking about.

Abstract words refer to concepts or feelings.

  • liberty
  • happy
  • love

“Liberty” is a concept, “happy” is a feeling, and no one can agree on whether “love” is a feeling, a concept or an action.

A person can’t see, touch, or taste any of these things. As a result, when used in poetry, these words might simply fly over the reader’s head, without triggering any sensory response. Further, “liberty,” “happy,” and “love” can mean different things to different people. Therefore, if the poet uses such a word, the reader may take a different meaning from it than the poet intended.

Change Abstract Words Into Concrete Words

To avoid problems caused by using abstract words, use concrete words.

Example: “She felt happy.”

This line uses the abstract word “happy.” To improve this line, change the abstract word to a concrete image. One way to achieve this is to think of an object or a scene that evokes feelings of happiness to represent the happy feeling.

Improvement: “Her smile spread like red tint on ripening tomatoes.”

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

Writing poetry is something to ponder about

Proverbial Thursday – Global Words of Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

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“A thousand workers, a thousand plans” – Chinese Proverb

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You do the thing you’re scared shitless of and then you get your courage. Not before. That’s the way it works. Three Kings, (Movie)

What do you make of the saying and the Proverb? Do you agree?

If not, why not?

(Oh! I sound like one of those dreadful surveys asking you to rate things between 1 and 10 then asking you to justify your answers…. please let me know your thoughts anyway).

Something to Ponder About this Thursday*

  • for past discussions on Proverbial Thursday, use the Search bar and enter Proverbial Thursday

Proverbial Thursday – Global Proverbs

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Proverbial thursdfly sml 3932

“Eplet faller ikke langt fra stammen”

‘The apple does not fall far from the tree’

Norwegian Proverb

The Confucian series continues this week:

“Our greatest glory is not in never falling,

but in rising every time we fall” ― Confucius

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Something Proverbial to Ponder About

Proverbial Thursday – Global Proverbs

Moffat Beach

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures.They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned.

Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Proverbial thursdfly sml 3932

‘You are part of something bigger than yourself’

–  Afghani proverb 

Khaled Hosseini   

In Afghanistan, you don’t understand yourself solely as an individual. You understand yourself as a son, a brother, a cousin to somebody, an uncle to somebody. [Source: http://stevemccurry.wordpress.com ]

My series on Confucian sayings continues:

“To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous.”
― Confucius

Something Proverbial to Ponder About