New Zealand
Australia, History & Traditions, Travel

Australia Speaks – Yeh Nah!

Australians are renowned for a laconic, self-deprecating sense of humour that is, to a large extent, the sort of mockery that is not meant to offend.

new_zealand_2013_160

Australia – New Zealand Relations

We love to tease the New Zealanders about their accent and habits, like their habit of calling all and sundry, ‘bro.’ The Kiwis, in turn, mock us about our own ‘Straylan‘ accent, about who really invented pavlova, or whether Russell Crowe is an Aussie or Kiwi.

[Although after the phone-throwing incident, there was a debate as to whether anyone would claim Russell, at all].

Mocking each other can be a sign of feeling secure enough with the friendship that each may ‘have a go,’ or tease someone, in a gentle way, hopefully without it being taken personally, or causing offence. And so it is between New Zealanders and Australians.

Teasing aside, our countries do have a fairly similar culture, at least historically in the Anglo-Saxon sense. Many of us have relatives in both countries.

house

We understand each other and visit all the time, prior to Corona, of course. It is quicker to travel to New Zealand than to travel to the other side of Australia, for goodness sake. When every second or third New Zealand Teenager moved to Australia in search of work, in the 1980s, the popular joke here, was:

“So you moved here from New Zealand? Did you leave the light on?”

New Zealanders are very welcome in Australia and are treated as one of us. Well, except when it comes to welfare payments, perhaps. ‘Nuff’ said.

Aussie Vernacular Idioms

My Kiwi cousins enjoy teasing me about the way Aussies say, “Yeh, nah,” or ‘yes,’ then ‘no’ in the one breath or sentence. And we do say it. No doubt.

All the time!

So why was this T-shirt found in a souvenir shop, in New Zealand, with a kiwi as part of the logo? “Hey, bro?

yeahnah

Are New Zealanders saying it, as well?

In defence of my fellow Aussies, this confusing phrase is used when we want to make two points, relative to one another, presumably to save time. As you may know, Aussies like to shorten everything to save time, especially when it comes to conversation and slang. As this video confirms:

In saying Yeh. Nah, we are agreeing with our conversational partner before further disagreeing on a smaller, less significant related point. Hence:

“Yeh, meaning you are right, (it looks like it might rain, but) “nah” meaning in reality, it probably won’t rain this afternoon – hence “Yeh, Nah, I don’t think it’s going to rain!”  Clear as mud?

It seems this confusing idiom that makes no literal sense has traversed the Tasman Sea, into New Zealand to the point that it’s now New Zealand speak, if only because it has the word, ‘bro’, after it!!

Aussies will NOT disagree with this, will they? Yeh…. nah!

And if you are ready for some more Aussie humour, Carl might give you a laugh.

Something for linguists to ponder about.

Community

Poetry Challenge – September Round up

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

The Prompt for September was to write a Limerick or humorous poem.

Only five lines long, limerick poems have an ‘AABBA’ rhyme scheme.

 

Featured Poets – Colonialist’s Blog

 

 

20171118_190220.jpg

I do suppose that each season
Does come with a kind of a reason,
And most are quite fine,
But I draw the line
At seasons that have my toes freezin’!

 

~The Colonialist

 

 

Find more about the Colonialist here

 

 

Hester writes a real cracker, really capturing the essence of the limerick’s humor:

 

An OLD bird who LIVES at the COAST

Lied DOWN in the SUN and she DOZED

She THOUGHT a light TAN

Would CATCH her a MAN

But NOW she’s burnt CRISP as dry TOAST

 

~Hester

This is a really awesome limerick!!! I love it, and it has that memory making sing-song quality so that it sticks in one’s head for quite a while!!

 

1295_happy_pencil_with_folder_049_tnb

I invite you to read this month’s submissions for the A and I Poetry challenge   who have all done a fantastic job.

 

Poetry Challenge Contributors for September

 

Ju- Lyn  varied the theme of seasons in refashioning-rules  but also decided to give the limerick form a go, here. And I am very glad she did. The limerick is deceptively easy to write but difficult to convey a message in such few words. Ju-Lyn nailed it.

Manjamexi  – penned a cheeky limerick with beautiful illustrations of mouth-watering photographs of a Cypress field many incarnations through the seasons.

Ineke’s delightful limerick on the seasonal changes in New Zealand – Scrapydo2.wordpress.com

Abrie Joubert – writes in Afrikaans but copy paste this into google Translate or use the translator button and you will find some wonderful words.

Abrie’s post on the A and I Poetry Challenge inspired two other Afrikaans writers to write limericks in the comments of Abrie’s post:

Hesterleynel  – she is at it again! Well done, Hester.

Toortsie

Perdebytjie

Very well done to all of you!  The translations were a lot of fun to read! One word translated to diarrhoea!! Not sure that it was meant as such, but it certainly was humorous!!

Hester’s post inspired Vuurklip to contribute in Afrikaans,on Hester blog post here

Tafuzul  – submitted a surpise poem.  He asked me to choose his best poem for his entry this month. Find it here

If you have written a poem in September and would like a linkback included here, please comment below.

Host bloggers Amanda  from Australia at Something to Ponder About and

Ineke from New Zealand at scrapydo2.wordpress.com  jointly host the challenge.

Ineke mostly does the poetry in Afrikaans, while Amanda uses English.

The challenge is open to all, from first-timers up to well-advanced poets. Be sure to comment here so that we can find your poem for October and add you to the link up post at the end of this month.

1295_happy_pencil_with_folder_049_tnb

October is the final month for the Poetry Challenge.

Community

Poetry Writing Tips and May Challenge

Poetry Writing Tips included below:-

Time is almost up for posting poems for the A and I Poetry Challenge for the month of  May. Have you written your poem, yet?

Post a poem with a linkback to my blog and Ineke’s before the 28th May, so I can easily find it and include it in the next monthly Poetry Challenge post.

 Poetry Challenge –  May Prompt

*Write a poem using this photograph or one of your own as inspiration.

 

N.B. If you choose to use your own photo, please post the photo along with the poem.

 

You will find the full post on the May prompt and guidelines here

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

Poetry Writing Tips

I will discuss more about using concrete language in poetry next month but here is a taste to get you thinking and writing in a more concrete way.

Tip: Use concrete language instead of abstract language

The key to writing great poetry is to write focused, concrete poetry. But many beginning poets write poetry based around wide themes such as love, life, and anger, generalizing their writing.

By using strong language, active verbs instead of passive verbs and concrete language instead of abstract, you can capture a reader’s interest and captivate a reader’s imagination. Poetry, as something others read, should be at its best interactive, and at its worse, straight forward and clear.

Here is an example:

Abstract vs concrete Example 1

 

Concrete words describe things that people experience with their senses.

  • orange
  • warm
  • cat

A person can see orange, feel warm, or hear a cat.

Poets use concrete words help the reader get a “picture” of what the poem is talking about. When the reader has a “picture” of what the poem is talking about, he/she can better understand what the poet is talking about.

Abstract words refer to concepts or feelings.

  • liberty
  • happy
  • love

“Liberty” is a concept, “happy” is a feeling, and no one can agree on whether “love” is a feeling, a concept or an action.

A person can’t see, touch, or taste any of these things. As a result, when used in poetry, these words might simply fly over the reader’s head, without triggering any sensory response. Further, “liberty,” “happy,” and “love” can mean different things to different people. Therefore, if the poet uses such a word, the reader may take a different meaning from it than the poet intended.

Change Abstract Words Into Concrete Words

To avoid problems caused by using abstract words, use concrete words.

Example: “She felt happy.”

This line uses the abstract word “happy.” To improve this line, change the abstract word to a concrete image. One way to achieve this is to think of an object or a scene that evokes feelings of happiness to represent the happy feeling.

Improvement: “Her smile spread like red tint on ripening tomatoes.”

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

Writing poetry is something to ponder about

Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Words of Wisdom

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

Proverbial sml

“A thousand workers, a thousand plans” – Chinese Proverb

pulling-out-hair

You do the thing you’re scared shitless of and then you get your courage. Not before. That’s the way it works. Three Kings, (Movie)

What do you make of the saying and the Proverb? Do you agree?

If not, why not?

(Oh! I sound like one of those dreadful surveys asking you to rate things between 1 and 10 then asking you to justify your answers…. please let me know your thoughts anyway).

Something to Ponder About this Thursday*

  • for past discussions on Proverbial Thursday, use the Search bar and enter Proverbial Thursday
Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Proverbs

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

“Eplet faller ikke langt fra stammen”

‘The apple does not fall far from the tree’

Norwegian Proverb

The Confucian series continues this week:

“Our greatest glory is not in never falling,

but in rising every time we fall” ― Confucius

waterlilly - Copy

Something Proverbial to Ponder About

Moffat Beach
Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Proverbs

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures.They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned.

Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Proverbial thursdfly sml 3932

‘You are part of something bigger than yourself’

–  Afghani proverb 

Khaled Hosseini   

In Afghanistan, you don’t understand yourself solely as an individual. You understand yourself as a son, a brother, a cousin to somebody, an uncle to somebody. [Source: http://stevemccurry.wordpress.com ]

My series on Confucian sayings continues:

“To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous.”
― Confucius

Something Proverbial to Ponder About

Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Proverbs

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct, in communicating messages, to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.Proverbial thursdfly sml 3932

“Liten tue kan velte stort lass”–Little strokes fell great oaks.

Norwegian proverb

“It is more shameful to distrust our friends than to be deceived by them.”
― Confucius

 

Something proverbial to ponder about

Community

Five Minutes of Summer – Free Writing Day 24 Silence

This challenge encourages to write freely for five minutes on a given topic, each day for the months of October, without major re-writing or corrections. I have at times, corrected spelling errors at times, because the proof reading control freak in me will not let the WordPress editing fairies down….but otherwise, free Writing it is….

You will find more topics here

wpid-wp-1443948548820.jpeg

2.52 pm

Silence – it can be deafening and sometimes, can roar like a 747 on landing. Silence can scar!

In that awkward moment when you slowly realize you have said something terribly wrong in front of a group, and the faces of your acquaintances, would-be friends or work colleagues respond with either incredulous gapes or curious, hard to interpret, facial expressions, and a multitude of body contortions that are quickly followed by convulsive sobs of silent laughter. – That is Silence!

In that split second, the brain has reacted, sending powerful impulses to the hormones and nerves. Blood rushes to the cheeks, nausea creeps up the throat and the thought processes descend into a spiralling whorl, that fills the mind with impulsive death wishes that typically involve some kind of underworld chasm opening up, (in what was moments ago, a solid floor), into which you would slip, leading ever downward to a murky, subterranean land of ‘faux pas’  never to immerse unmarked again……..

2.57pm

Silence – Day 24 FMFW

Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Proverbs and Sayings

Proverbial sml

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

“A family tie is like a tree, it can bend but it cannot break.” – African Proverb

”A threat from outside refines the arts” – Sibelius

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking. 

I hope you will too.

Something proverbial to Ponder About

Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Proverbs and Sayings

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something. Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.  I hope you will too.

This week, I have an Afrikaans proverb to share with you from a lovely blogger, in my community. The delightful Sonel, from Sonel’s World  has contributed the following proverb that relates to the notion of Trust and a discussion on this issue that stemmed from a post in the 31 days of Free Writing Challenge.

“We always say in Afrikaans:

‘Kyk die kat uit die boom’ (Check the cat out in the tree).”Source: Sonel

One good friend is worth many acquaintances – Source: Unknown

Proverbial thursdfly sml 3932Something to Ponder About

Community

Five Minutes of Summer – October Online Blogging Challenge

The 31 Days Free Writing Challenge, dictates that bloggers pick one topic and write a post for five minutes or thereabouts, (I confess to being verbose!), on that topic each day in October.

Day 11 – Storm

“There’s a storm brewing” –

The word “Storm” evokes thoughts of threatening and damaging forces out of our control. We have storms in summertime only. Winter is dry and dusty. Summer thunderstorms  mean a sub-tropical venting of nature’s spleen, which has filled to bursting with rapidly rising temperatures and high humidity, in the tropical areas of the world. The Storm bird, known as the ‘Koel’, knows the Storm is coming, even before the weather man knows, and it sings its unique call, early in the morning or the days prior to a storm. But how does it know?

The ants also pick up the ominous signs and move to higher ground, and invade my kitchen as well! (I guess that is where the good stuff is)… This pisses off my temper which has already been pushed to the limits by my lack of tolerance for hot weather and humidity.[You can see why I like snow and the cold]

Here is a typical day for a storm:

First, we need a blistering day with mercury soaring above 29 degrees and a rapid rise in night time humidity that ensures a stickiness in the air that would challenge Scotchtape! By early next morning, the crickets signal it is time to get up from soaked, sweat – ridden bed -sheets; by morning tea, dare to step outside in the sun and you will burn in just 10 minutes, by lunchtime, the asphalt road surface shimmers with a mirage- like heat haze, and folk start to complain loudly and vociferously about “the heat,” whilst dripping with sweat, and then around 3pm, invariably when the children have to be picked up from school, the storm will break- heralded by huge raindrops the size of tennis ball that render raincoats next to useless  and ferocious wind gusts that turn umbrellas into some kind of frilly flying javelin ready to impale some unsuspecting citizen.

The summer Storm is vicious and nasty and hits with a thundering force accompanied by spectacular lightning and occasionally damaging hail.I like to see the lightning, especially the forked lightning, so spectacular, unless you are out on the sporting field. The rain is torrential, enough to fill a large water tank in minutes. It often rains vertically upwards at my place in a summer storm, as the rain lashing at my house’s guttering fails to cope with the deluge and is then directed upwards! The storm can un-roof houses, turn a paddling brook into a gushing torrent in minutes, marooning kids on pushbikes and cars alike. “If it is flooded, forget it”, is now the motto from the Road Safety Authority due to way too many cars attempting to cross flooded creeks in the midst of a storm. {At times, resulting in drownings!}

For children, storms are fun. As a child, we lived in a street with a natural gully or dip where the rainwater would collect during the summer downpours, and this invariably came close to Christmas school holidays. For an hour or two, during or after a storm, this street’s drainage systems would struggle to cope with the volume of water meaning the children of the street welcomed the instant, albeit, muddy-co loured, ad-hoc swimming pool and the odd car was left floating until the water subsided.

If the storm comes at nighttime, my dog panics! But this year, she won’t worry, as she is so old, she has gone deaf.  When I was 5 years old, I used to panic, like my faithful canine companion, when the storms came. My mother used to tell me it was fine, it was just Santa dragging his sack of Christmas presents across the sky, in readiness to give to the children on Dec 25th.[She didn’t explain the rain or the wind gusts, but thinking about Santa and wind is probably an area she did not want to broach, for good reason! ] The thought that this cataclysmic natural event was Santa’s doing certainly gave me plenty of comfort and was one of the most thoughtful things my mother said to me.  This challenge has brought that memory flooding back. Which also reminds me of this Gangajang song which I associate with summer in Australia and the word, “Storm” –

Out on the patio we sit,

And the humidity we breathe,

We watch the lightning crack over the cane-fields

Laugh and think, that this is Australia

Summer storm season is almost upon us, and that is something we need to prepare for, not just ponder about.

Other days in this writing challenge are found here

Community

Proverbial Thursday – Global Proverbs and Quotes

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something. Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.  I hope you will too.

The first proverb is a little obscure, so I am hoping readers may share their thoughts about what the real meaning of this proverb could be? The second, the quotation, was chosen after hearing of reports of increased conflict in the Syrian region.

“Frog likes water, but not hot water”Swahili Proverb

“In the practice of tolerance, one’s enemy is the best teacher” – The Dalai Lama

Proverbial thursdfly sml 3932Something to Ponder About Today

Community

Proverbial Thursday – Proverbs and Sayings from Around the World

I find there to be profound wisdom in proverbs, sayings and quotes and I marvel at the way they are so succinct in communicating messages to the reader. Mostly anonymous, they come to us from past generations and from across cultures. They speak of the experiences of lives lived and lessons learned. Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

Each Thursday, I post a Proverb or Saying and a Quote that I find thought-provoking.  I hope you will too.

A life without love is like a year without summer“ – Swedish proverb

Sometimes the things you really want sneak in the back door. Notice! – Mary Anne Radmacher

 

Proverbial sml

Something to ponder about this Thursday