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ANZAC Poem

The Ode

They went with songs to the battle, they were young.
Straight of limb, true of eyes, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

Lest We Forget

ceremony
A Dawn Anzac Ceremony – a strong Tradition in Australia

What is an ANZAC?

“ANZACS,”  is an acronym for the Australian and New Zealand Army Core, a group of troops renowned as courageous fighters who fought agains the Turks in the battlefields of WW I, far away from their own shores. Members on both sides of my family were injured and died at this gory battlefield.

Each year on April 25, Australia and New Zealand remember the Anzacs and broadly all the casualties of war. With ceremonies and services, the Anzac day traditions continue to grow in popularity, even though the last “digger” or Anzac soldier has passed away. Ceremonies are attended in every town, large and small, and attended by young people who proudly wear Grandfather’s medals and older ex-servicemen alike.

This year, Australians will honour them by standing on our driveway in a line of honour at 5.55am.

Gympie

The sacrifice and valour of the original soldiers created the ANZAC legend and constituted a turning point in Australian history and the formulation of Australia’s identity. After this battle and war, Australians seemed no longer satisfied to be part of a British outpost in the Pacific. As a nation, we had grown up. We wanted to be a country and identity, in our own right, not a mere vassal. The Anzac legend fortified this belief.

The Anzac story of the Gallipoli battle has now become legendary. The Gallipoli battalions were sent into battle, under-resourced, and ordered to positions impossible to defend; vertical cliffs with enemy positioned at the top.

They were headed for a level of bloodshed on all sides, previously unknown in the annals of modern history. Actor Mel Gibson immortalized the Anzac soldier’s spirit in the 1981 film “Gallipoli”. It makes me cry every single time I watch it, for the men, their families and the loss of Australia’s best young men.

So every April 25, we will always remember them.

Lest We Forget

A snippet from 1981 of a surpringly nervous Mel Gibson as he talks about the film.

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Do you Remember an Inn?

Have you ever found yourself reciting a poem you learnt many, years ago at school? One that you were tasked to learn by rote and recite out loud in front of the class?

Why do these words stick like Super Glue to our permanent memory cells?

When so much else fails to the memory wayside?

Is it because rote learning is a little like brainwashing?

On the way to Cromwell.....the Lindis pass

After reading Margaret’s post today, the poem ‘Tarantella’ came to mind. I love the use of onomatopoeia in that poem, and I like that the poem is factual, apparently.

I cannot reproduce the whole of the poem below for copyright reasons, so I have redacted some lines. Which sort of spoils the effect, so I have redacted minimal amounts and cited the author, of course.

Where am I

All it needs is a semi-related trigger and I’ll robotically begin to articulate those words from the poem, learnt word for word, so very long ago.

School years where chanting and rote learning was commonplace

If it is a type of rote learning, then for goodness sake why do we spend hours teaching our kids complicated strategies to work out their times tables, when a few weeks of chanting would translate to a life long skill without need for any mental refreshment, ever.

Equally concerning is what other values or words might be ingrained in our memory banks at a tender age by chanting brainwashing?

Luckily for me, this brainwashing is nothing more sinister than my times tables and a Hilaire Belloc poem with a bouncy repetitive rhyme. But as a gift to Miranda, that poem has a conclusion filled with doom, albeit twenty years later, (when it was written), and the memory of the inn may have faded?

The Miranda of Hilaire Belloc’s “Tarantella” is Miranda Mackintosh whom Belloc met at an inn in the Pyrenean hamlet of Canranc on the River Aragon in 1909. The poem, written twenty years later, was a New Year’s present to the Scottish Miranda. The holograph copy is inscribed: “For Miranda: New Year’s 1929.”

http://www.poetrybyheart.org.uk/poems/tarantella/

Tarantella by Hiliare Belloc

Do you remember an Inn, Miranda?

Do you remember an Inn?

And the fleas that tease in the High Pyrenees,
And the wine that tasted of tar?
And the cheers and the jeers of the young muleteers
(Under the vine of the dark veranda)?
****************** ?
******************?
And the cheers and the jeers of the young muleteers
Who hadn’t got a penny,
And who weren’t paying any,
And the hammer at the doors and the din?
And the hip! hop! hap!
Of the clap
Of the hands to the swirl and the twirl
Of the girl gone chancing,
Glancing,
Dancing,
Backing and advancing,
Snapping of the clapper to the spin
Out and in–
And the ting, tong, tang of the guitar!
Do you remember an Inn,
Miranda?
Do you remember an Inn?

Never more;
Miranda,
Never more.
Only the ****************;
And Aragon a torrent at the door.
No sound
In the walls of the halls where falls
The tread
Of the feet of the dead to the ground,
No sound:

************
Of the far waterfall like doom.

The ting, tong, tang of the guitar

Do you have an poem that has become an earworm over time?

Something that sticks?

Inspired by Margaret‘s photos of the Pyrenees.

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Proverbial Friday

Several years ago, I created ‘Proverbial Friday’ on my blog. I became fascinated with traditional proverbs and sayings, their metaphorical layers and the many different interpretations found within just a few, succinct words. I marveled at their ability to transcend race, religion, opinions and age. Mostly anonymous, proverbs are a portal through time to generations past and echo a diverse range of cultures. They speak, to me, of the experiences of many lessons learnt and the wisdom from thousands of lives already lived. Not only that, but they offer us knowledge; knowledge that is passed to us in much the same way relay runners might pass a baton. Once it’s handed over, it is up to us what we do with it and how we pass it on.

 

Weekly Quotes –  On Learning

 

 

The more I awaken, the less I desire to fit in

– Unknown

 

This quote appears to encourage individuality, but then I read this which contradicts the first in some way…..

 

“People who are truly effective,

didn’t get there by chilling out.”

 

Hallingdal Golfjellet

 

The first quote praises inventiveness, initiative and creativity, sullying the notion of collaboration and conformity.

The second quote gives us a reference to hard work and not quitting?

I suppose it depends on what you consider “effective” might be.

What do you think?

Are these sayings too subjective to be constructive suggestions for us?

 

Weekly Proverb – On Learning

Quotes, like proverbs, make us think more deeply about something.

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Keep learning because knowledge is the key to power ~ Polish Proverb  
 

I invite you to join in the discussion, by leaving a comment.

Because everyone’s opinion is important.

What is yours?

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Proverbial Friday – Something to Ponder About

Soender Felding, Denmark
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Poetry Challenge – OctPoWriMo

The following poem is the one I have always liked and I wrote it so quickly – it must be that writing from the heart, makes a difference.

I am submitting it for the October poetry month challenge. A little late but I have been occupied with hosting my own poetry challenge, which ends this month, well, last month, now that today is officially November.

You can check out another of my poems here/2018/11/01/poetry-challenge-october-prompt-2/

architecture boats buildings canal
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

‘Still in my Heart’

Home Sweet Home afar from me,
At least 10 hours over sky and sea,

A fairy tale land of red and white,
of rain, and wind, and winter nights.

Yet still you send my heart a flutter,
And here, I can but get your butter,

Cos’ when I’m sad and feeling down,
You can lift my spirits like a children’s clown.

What is this strange longing and connection,
I feel for such warm and fuzzy introspection?

Of land and family long dead and passed,
Would they think me to be completely daft?

Yet I am of them, and they are of me,
This continual spreading of the family tree.

The branches are like the ancient Birch
Resilient, pervasive til one drops off the Perch.

If only I could stay or perhaps visit more often,
But my responsibilities and circumstances rarely soften.

So I must dream and wish and be ever so frugal,
And if I can’t afford to travel there, there is always Google!

~ The Sunshine Elves

Andrea Heiberg
Poetry Dedication:

In memory and thanks for a great friend, Andrea Heiberg.

You are watching now from another place, I place I cannot yet go.

Just what are you thinking, I do wonder.

~Amanda

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Poetry Challenge – October Reminder

October Prompt:

~ Write a poem to, or about, your future self.

How might you see yourself, or your life, in ten years time.

 

ask blackboard chalk board chalkboard
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

This prompt is merely a suggestion and you may choose a topic of your liking and still be included in the challenge.

Remember to add the tag A and I Poetry Challenge, to your post, so that I can link to your blog in the final end of month round up of contributors.

FINAL  MONTH FOR THE POETRY CHALLENGE

POST BEFORE 31ST OCTOBER to be INCLUDED in the CHALLENGE ROUND UP POST.

The challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will include writing tips and link backs for contributors. Beginner poet, hobbyist or Advanced writer We hope you will join in.

You can write in either language, however, please post a link back, and comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge. 

In this way, we can find you and read your poetry.

 

Have fun!

A and I Poetry Challenge

Something poetic to ponder About

Scrapydo2

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Poetry Challenge – September Prompt

A little late but here is my contribution to the A and I Poetry Challenge for September.

I am not the girl in the poem, rather I am the one living in the tropics yearning for some cooler weather.

Thingvellir

 

 

In Iceland, a girl yearned for some heat,

to soothe her aching, chill-blained feet.

With her savings she gained,

A ticket on a plane,

Soon stepping her toes on the beach.

 

 

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September Prompt

Write a limerick poem on the change of the season and post on your blog before 28th September. If you live in the Northern hemisphere, write about the onset of Autumn. Those living in the South, including Ineke and Amanda, write about the onset of Spring.

A Limerick is a humorous poem wherein the first line sets up the character(s) and setting, so the reader knows right away who/what the story is about.

Only five lines long, limerick poems have an ‘AABBA’ rhyme scheme.

If you wish to join in with the final month of the challenge, click on the link below:

 

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Poetry Challenge – September Round up

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

The Prompt for September was to write a Limerick or humorous poem.

Only five lines long, limerick poems have an ‘AABBA’ rhyme scheme.

 

Featured Poets – Colonialist’s Blog

 

 

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I do suppose that each season
Does come with a kind of a reason,
And most are quite fine,
But I draw the line
At seasons that have my toes freezin’!

 

~The Colonialist

 

 

Find more about the Colonialist here

 

 

Hester writes a real cracker, really capturing the essence of the limerick’s humor:

 

An OLD bird who LIVES at the COAST

Lied DOWN in the SUN and she DOZED

She THOUGHT a light TAN

Would CATCH her a MAN

But NOW she’s burnt CRISP as dry TOAST

 

~Hester

This is a really awesome limerick!!! I love it, and it has that memory making sing-song quality so that it sticks in one’s head for quite a while!!

 

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I invite you to read this month’s submissions for the A and I Poetry challenge   who have all done a fantastic job.

 

Poetry Challenge Contributors for September

 

Ju- Lyn  varied the theme of seasons in refashioning-rules  but also decided to give the limerick form a go, here. And I am very glad she did. The limerick is deceptively easy to write but difficult to convey a message in such few words. Ju-Lyn nailed it.

Manjamexi  – penned a cheeky limerick with beautiful illustrations of mouth-watering photographs of a Cypress field many incarnations through the seasons.

Ineke’s delightful limerick on the seasonal changes in New Zealand – Scrapydo2.wordpress.com

Abrie Joubert – writes in Afrikaans but copy paste this into google Translate or use the translator button and you will find some wonderful words.

Abrie’s post on the A and I Poetry Challenge inspired two other Afrikaans writers to write limericks in the comments of Abrie’s post:

Hesterleynel  – she is at it again! Well done, Hester.

Toortsie

Perdebytjie

Very well done to all of you!  The translations were a lot of fun to read! One word translated to diarrhoea!! Not sure that it was meant as such, but it certainly was humorous!!

Hester’s post inspired Vuurklip to contribute in Afrikaans,on Hester blog post here

Tafuzul  – submitted a surpise poem.  He asked me to choose his best poem for his entry this month. Find it here

If you have written a poem in September and would like a linkback included here, please comment below.

Host bloggers Amanda  from Australia at Something to Ponder About and

Ineke from New Zealand at scrapydo2.wordpress.com  jointly host the challenge.

Ineke mostly does the poetry in Afrikaans, while Amanda uses English.

The challenge is open to all, from first-timers up to well-advanced poets. Be sure to comment here so that we can find your poem for October and add you to the link up post at the end of this month.

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October is the final month for the Poetry Challenge.

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Poetry Challenge – October Prompt

A and I Poetry Challenge Hosts are a Blogger and Writer, from New Zealand, Ineke, of Scrapydo2 and Blogger from Australia, Amanda, of  Something to Ponder About.

Amanda and Ineke

Amanda’s Poetry challenge is  in English and Ineke’s Poetry Challenge is in Afrikaans, (with many translations in English). Everyone is welcome to join in. October is the final month of this challenge! Please do join in!

You can write in either language, however, please post a link back, and comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge.

For Full guidelines on joining in, click here.

 

October Prompt:

~ Write a poem to, or about, your future self.

How might you see yourself, or your life, in ten years time.

 

ask blackboard chalk board chalkboard
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

 

This prompt is merely a suggestion and you may choose a topic of your liking and still be included in the challenge.

Remember to add the tag A and I Poetry Challenge, to your post, so that I can link to your blog in the final end of month round up of contributors.

 

The challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will include writing tips and link backs for contributors. Beginner poet, hobbyist or Advanced writer We hope you will join in.

You can write in either language, however, please post a link back, and comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge. 

In this way, we can find you and read your poetry.

 

Have fun!

A and I Poetry Challenge

Something poetic to ponder About

Scrapydo2

Community

Poetry Challenge – September Prompt

Rothenburg wall
Rothenburg, Germany

September Poetry Prompt – Seasons

 

Write a limerick poem on the change of the season and post on your blog before 28th September. If you live in the Northern hemisphere, write about the onset of Autumn. Those living in the South, including Ineke and Amanda, write about the onset of Spring.

A Limerick is a humorous poem wherein the first line sets up the character(s) and setting, so the reader knows right away who/what the story is about.

Only five lines long, limerick poems have an ‘AABBA’ rhyme scheme.

 

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

Hosts Blogger and writer from New Zealand, Ineke fromscrapydo2.wordpress.com and Blogger, Amanda from Something to Ponder About, are jointly hosting a Poetry Challenge.

Amanda’s challenge is  in English and Ineke’s is in Afrikaans, (translations in English).

The challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will run from March to October, 2018 and will include writing tips and link backs for contributors. Beginner poet, hobbyist or Advanced writer We hope you will join in.

You can write in either language, however, please post a link back, and comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge. 

In this way, we can find you and read your poetry.

Here are last month’s contributors.

For Full guidelines on joining in with the A and I Poetry Challenge, click here.

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Poetry Challenge – August Heart Poems

A and I Poetry Challenge Hosts are a Blogger and Writer, from New Zealand, Ineke, of Scrapydo2 and Blogger from Australia, Amanda, of  Something to Ponder About.

Amanda and Ineke

Amanda’s Poetry challenge is  in English and Ineke’s Poetry Challenge is in Afrikaans, (with many translations in English). Everyone is welcome to join in.

You can write in either language, however, please post a link back, and comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge.

For Full guidelines on joining in, click here.

Hearts on waterfeature (Small)
August – Heart Poem

 

Feature Poem for August

 

This month’s feature poet is Steph, from the blog, Stories and Things Like That.  I really like the repetition Steph uses in this poem and how the shape reinforces and emphasizes the touching memories of a loved one.

 

heart

 

 

Blogger Submissions for August

 

The prompt in August was to write a poem or format a poem with a Heart theme.

We had some wonderful interpretations of this theme, so please do hop around and check them all out.

  • Hesterleynel  writes in both Afrikaans and English, which is no easy feat and cleverly uses a heart format to communicate her words.

 

 

  • Ju- Lyn writes an exquisite Somonka.  Just as two souls are intwined in love, Ju-Lyn has intwined Two Tanka poems about the power of Love.

 

  • Yvette at priorhouse.blog delights us with eye -pleasing photographs  and a fun heart shaped format to accompany her writing.

 

  • Ineke at  scrapydo2 writes a touching poem about love, loss and forgiveness

    (Insert into Google translate for English)

 

  • Amanda  aused a heart graphic and rhyme to enhance this love poem here

 

  • Mammasquirrel presents a poem honoring her faith and love of the Divine.

 

  • Manja writes a poetic story of love, separation, and what’s more, it comes beautifully illustrated  with photographs.

 

  • Tafazul writes with honesty and directness in his poem for August.

 

 

Please let me know if you submitted a poem during August, and the link is not listed here.

Sometimes pingbacks do not work as they should.

~ Amanda

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heart
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Poetry Challenge – August prompt closing soon

A and I Poetry Challenge – August prompt

Contributions for August close soon. Publish a blog post with your poem before 30th August if you wish to be included in the round up for August:

Write a Heart Poem:

This might be a poem with lines written in the shape of a heart, or a poem about love, getting to the heart of a problem, about  folks wearing their hearts on their sleeves, or someone showing a lot of heart in competitions.

Post on your blog on or before 30th August, 2018 to be included in the link-backs.

The prompt is merely a suggestion and any topic is welcome.

Here is my contribution for August:

August prompt

When You Leave

My heart does dream of only you,

it has no time or rudder.

Until your touch is felt again,

that longing makes me shudder.

Your trust you gave implicitly

I will not lie or tease,

for in between life’s dark and light,

It ‘s you I long to please.

 

 

Hosts Blogger and writer from New Zealand, Ineke from scrapydo2.wordpress.com and Blogger, Amanda from Something to Ponder About, are jointly hosting the A and I Poetry Challenge. Amanda’s challenge is  in English and Ineke’s is in Afrikaans, (with translations in English).

The challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will run from March to October, 2018.

You can write in either language but please post a link back or comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge.

Beginner poet, hobbyist or Advanced writer – we hope you will join in with us.

For Full guidelines click here.

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

Something Lovingly Poetic to Ponder About

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Poetry Challenge – August Prompt and Writing Resources

A and I Poetry Challenge-  Tips on Writing and Prompt for August – see below

Hosts Blogger and writer from New Zealand, Ineke from scrapydo2.wordpress.com and Blogger, Amanda from Something to Ponder About, are jointly hosting the A and I Poetry Challenge in English and in Afrikaans, in the WordPress community.

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The challenge is open to everyone, from complete beginners to advanced writers or aspiring poets. The challenge will run from March to October, 2018.

You can write in either language but please post a link back or comment at both WordPress blogs to indicate your interest and include the tag  A and I Poetry Challenge.

Each month we will post poetry writing tips, (see this month’s below) and link-backs to those who contributed by posting a poem with the Tag  A and I Poetry Challenge. on their blog.

Beginner poet, hobbyist or Advanced writer – we hope you will join in with us.

For Full guidelines click here.

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

August PromptWrite a Heart poem

 

This might be a poem with lines written in the shape of a heart, or a poem about love, getting to the heart of a problem, about  folks wearing their hearts on their sleeves, or someone showing a lot of heart in competitions.

Post on your blog on or before 30th August, 2018 to be included in the link-backs for August.  The prompt is merely a suggestion and any topic is welcome.

Hearts on waterfeature (Small)
Write a Heart Poem in August

August Poetry Writing Tips

Finding inspiration to write poetry isn’t always easy or may not come automatically to many of us. Sometimes, our minds just get stuck for the right word. Or you can feel the word on the tip of your tongue but cannot get it out?

There are loads of tools on the net to help you in this sticky situation.

This month we look at some sites to help us find inspiration and words for our Poetry.

RhymeZone

The most popular rhyming dictionary is RhymeZone. Enter the word you need a rhyme for and Rhymezone returns multiple words that rhyme. RhymeZone also has some useful advanced features. If you want to find words that rhyme with love, just enter “love” at Rhymezone and you will get responses for one syllable and multi-syllable rhyming words. You can also search for synonyms or even definitions with this site.

Rhymes Lexemic

This site gives you options to vary the number of syllables and use a pronunciation search as opposed to one that searches on correct spelling alone.

Rhymebrain

This site gives you options in other languages

www.festisite.com/

allows you to search by tag, rhyme and submit your creation online so you can read others’ poems for inspiration.

www.b-rhymes.com/

This site gives you words that sound good together even if don’t technically rhyme.

More Rhyming Dictionary Sites

 

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Poetry Challenge Roundup for July

July is a month where many in both hemispheres take holidays, the temperate south freezes a little, while the subtropical south basks in dry warm daytime temps, and the temperate north experiences its long daylight hours of summertime. Great for relaxing and taking it easy. Perhaps some of our other contributors are also on holiday.

So I invite you to take a look at this month’s submissions who join in with the

A and I Poetry challenge for this month.

A and I Poetry Challenge

 

The Prompt for July was to: –

Turn on the radio to any channel.

Write a poem inspired by the first thing you hear

(lyrics to a song, a commercial, etc.)

 

sound speaker radio microphone
Photo by Gratisography on Pexels.com

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Featured Poet – Tafazul Mattoo

Tafazul is an engineering student from Kashmir who loves to draw and write. His poetry is so very interesting to read. You can find more of his work at his blog, here.

Not sure if he should begin,
frightened about the endings.
He dipped his brush in the air filled with melancholy,
painting his chaos on her heart.
She followed the chaos.

Lucerne lights

its a labyrinth

that is what she thought
only frightened about the beginnings,
but they both were stuck in a maze

at different dead ends.

_Tafazul Mattoo

 

I am including another link to a poem of Tafazul’s here as it is definitely worth a read!

tafazulsblog.wordpress.com/2018/06/25/nail-in-the-coffin

Ju – Lyn is celebrating with lots of luscious imagery here – purplepumpernickelblog.wordpress.com/

Manja took us on a trip to Trieste – manjameximovie3.wordpress.com/

Amanda at Penpunt writes bilingually in Afrikaans and English, with her poem that  makes readers think more deeply about the back story of conflict in her submission. A must read.

Jolene from So much to Tell you shines a light amongst the shadows with her poem here

 

If you have written a poem in July and would like a link included here, please leave a comment.

August Poetry Prompt posted next week here and on scrapydo2.wordpress.com

 

 

St P A